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Overview of all keyword tags in articles

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This page provides an overview of 2 tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of tags and narrow the focus to specific items of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factor Charts

drm

Digital rights management (DRM) is a term for access control technologies that are used by hardware manufacturers, publishers, copyright holders and individuals to limit the use of digital content and devices. The term is used to describe any technology that inhibits uses of digital content that is not desired or intended by the content provider. The term does not generally refer to other forms of copy protection, which can be circumvented without modifying the file or device, such as serial numbers or keyfiles. It can also refer to restrictions associated with specific instances of digital works or devices. Digital rights management is used by companies such as Sony, Amazon, Apple Inc., Microsoft, AOL and the BBC. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Digital rights management)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.2%.
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edrms

Electronic Document and Records Management System (EDRMS) is a type of content management system and refers to the combined technologies of document management and records management systems as an integrated system. Electronic document and records management aims to enable organizations to manage documents and records throughout the document life-cycle, from creation to destruction. Typically, systems consider a document a work in progress until it has undergone review, approval, lock-down and (potentially) publication, at which point it becomes a formal record within the organization. Once a document achieves the status of a record, the organization may apply best-practice or legally enforced retention policies which state how the second half of the record life-cycle will progress. This typically involves retention (and protection from change), until some events occur which relate to the record and which trigger the final disposition schedule to apply to the record. Eventually, typically at a set time after these events, the record undergoes destruction. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: EDRMS)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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by Dr. Radut