Overview of all keyword tags in articles

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This page provides an overview of 1399 tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of tags and narrow the focus to specific items of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Charts

rdbms

A relational database management system (RDBMS) is a database management system (DBMS) that is based on the relational model as introduced by E. F. Codd. Most popular databases currently in use are based on the relational database model. A short definition of an RDBMS is: a DBMS in which data is stored in tables and the relationships among the data are also stored in tables. The data can be accessed or reassembled in many different ways without having to change the table forms. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_database_management_system">Wiki... article: Relational database management system (RDBMS)</a>)

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rdf

The Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a family of World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) specifications originally designed as a metadata data model. It has come to be used as a general method for conceptual description or modeling of information that is implemented in web resources, using a variety of syntax formats. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_Description_Framework">Wikipedia article: RDF</a>)

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rdfa

RDFa (or Resource Description Framework - in - attributes) is a W3C Recommendation that adds a set of attribute level extensions to XHTML for embedding rich metadata within Web documents. The RDF data model mapping enables its use for embedding RDF triples within XHTML documents, it also enables the extraction of RDF model triples by compliant user agents. The W3C RDF in XHTML Taskforce is also working on an implementation for non-XML versions of HTML. The primary issue for the non-XML implementation is how to handle the lack of XML namespaces. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RDFa">Wikipedia article: RDFa</a>)

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rdfs

RDF Schema (variously abbreviated as RDFS, RDF(S), RDF-S, or RDF/S) is an extensible knowledge representation language, providing basic elements for the description of ontologies, otherwise called Resource Description Framework (RDF) vocabularies, intended to structure RDF resources. The first version was published by the World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C) in April 1998, and the final W3C recommendation was released in February 2004. Many RDFS components are included in the more expressive language Web Ontology Language (OWL). (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RDF_Schema">Wikipedia article: RDFS</a>)

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real audio

RealAudio is a proprietary audio format developed by RealNetworks and first released in 1995. It uses a variety of audio codecs, ranging from low-bitrate formats that can be used over dialup modems, to high-fidelity formats for music. It can also be used as a streaming audio format, that is played at the same time as it is downloaded. In the past, many internet radio stations used RealAudio to stream their programming over the internet in real time. In recent years, however, the format has become less common and has given way to more popular audio formats. RealAudio was heavily used by the BBC websites until 2009, though due to its declining use, only BBC World Service is still available in this format. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RealAudio">Wikipedia article: RealAudio</a>)

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realaudio

RealAudio is a proprietary audio format developed by RealNetworks and first released in 1995. It uses a variety of audio codecs, ranging from low-bitrate formats that can be used over dialup modems, to high-fidelity formats for music. It can also be used as a streaming audio format, that is played at the same time as it is downloaded. In the past, many internet radio stations used RealAudio to stream their programming over the internet in real time. In recent years, however, the format has become less common and has given way to more popular audio formats. RealAudio was heavily used by the BBC websites until 2009, though due to its declining use, only BBC World Service is still available in this format. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RealAudio">Wikipedia article: RealAudio</a>)

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redland

Redland is a set of free software libraries written in C that provide support for the Resource Description Framework (RDF), created by Dave Beckett (a former resident of Redland, Bristol). The packages that form Redland are: Redland RDF Application Framework providing the C RDF API; Raptor RDF Parser Toolkit for parsing and serializing RDF syntaxes (RDF/XML, N-Triples, Turtle, RSS tag soup, Atom); Rasqal RDF Query Library for executing RDF queries with RDQL and SPARQL; Redland Language Bindings for APIs to Redland in C#, Java, Objective-C, Perl, PHP, Python, Ruby and Tcl. Redland is a mature set of libraries, in development since 2000 and closely conformant to the relevant W3C specifications. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redland_RDF_Application_Framework">Wikipedia article: Redland</a>)

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refworks

RefWorks is a web-based commercial citation manager — an application for managing references, retrieving bibliographic information, and designing texts in terms of their literature references. Subscribers can store their reference database online, allowing them to use and update it from anywhere, and to share data with other subscribers. Universities can subscribe on behalf of all their students and faculty, and the software enables linking to electronic editions of journals to which the university libraries hold subscriptions. This linking is accomplished by incorporating an institution's OpenURL resolver. A number of Canadian academic libraries that licence RefWorks for managing research online have moved their accounts to a Canadian server because of concerns that student and faculty members' research could be investigated under the USA Patriot Act if their data remain stored south of the border. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RefWorks">Wikipedia article: RefWorks</a>)

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relax ng

In computing, RELAX NG (REgular LAnguage for XML Next Generation) is a schema language for XML, based on Murata Makoto's RELAX and James Clark's TREX. A RELAX NG schema specifies a pattern for the structure and content of an XML document. A RELAX NG schema is itself an XML document; however, RELAX NG also offers a popular compact, non-XML syntax. Compared to other popular schema languages, RELAX NG is relatively simple. It was defined by a committee specification of the OASIS RELAX NG technical committee in 2001 and 2002, and also by part two of the international standard ISO/IEC 19757: Document Schema Definition Languages (DSDL). (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RELAX_NG">Wikipedia article: RELAX NG</a>)

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remote working

Telecommuting or telework is a work arrangement in which employees enjoy flexibility in working location and hours. In other words, the daily commute to a central place of work is replaced by telecommunication links. Many work from home, while others, occasionally also referred to as nomad workers or web commuters utilize mobile telecommunications technology to work from coffee shops or other locations. Telework is a broader term, referring to substituting telecommunications for any form of work-related travel, thereby eliminating the distance restrictions of telecommuting. A person who telecommutes is known as a "telecommuter". A frequently repeated motto is that "work is something you do, not something you travel to". (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecommuting">Wikipedia article: Remote working</a>)

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repositories

A repository in publishing, and especially in academic publishing, is a real or virtual facility for the deposit of academic publications, such as academic journal articles. Deposit of material in such a site may be mandatory for a certain group, such as a particular university's doctoral graduates in a thesis repository, or published papers from those holding grants from a particular government agency in a subject repository, or, sometimes, in their own institutional repository. Or it may be voluntary, as usually the case for technical reports at a university. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repository_(publishing)">Wikipedia article: Repository</a>)

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request for comments

In computer network engineering, a Request for Comments (RFC) is a memorandum published by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) describing methods, behaviors, research, or innovations applicable to the working of the Internet and Internet-connected systems. Through the Internet Society, engineers and computer scientists may publish discourse in the form of an RFC, either for peer review or simply to convey new concepts, information, or (occasionally) engineering humor. The IETF adopts some of the proposals published as RFCs as Internet standards. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Request_for_Comments">Wikipedia article: Request for comments</a>)

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research

Research can be defined as the search for knowledge, or as any systematic investigation, with an open mind, to establish novel facts, usually using a scientific method. The primary purpose for basic research (as opposed to applied research) is discovering, interpreting, and the development of methods and systems for the advancement of human knowledge on a wide variety of scientific matters of our world and the universe. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Research">Wikipedia article: Research</a>)

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research information management

Research information refers to administrative information about research projects, researchers, research outputs, funding, and so on. Universities need to manage information about the research they host, in order to inform strategic decisions about that research, to ease reporting to external stakeholders such as funding councils and research funders, and to offer useful services to those within and beyond the institution’s boundaries. There is a lot of work at the moment in this area in the UK, complementing that in other countries. In both the Netherlands and Denmark, for example, universities use a common system to document core information about research (METIS and PURE respectively). Both of these systems are based around the CERIF data model, as are other systems in use such as Converis and the publications-oriented system Symplectic and national systems such as HunCRIS (in Hungary) and SICRIS (in Slovenia). In the UK, JISC, HEFCE, the Research Councils and others are funding a range of work to help the sector better manage information about research, covering institutional infrastructure (joining up institutional systems), national infrastructure (building services and interoperability to share research information), as well as providing guidance, support and opportunities to share experiences and work together. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/themes/informationenvironment/researchinf... source</a>)

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resource description

The Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a family of World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) specifications originally designed as a metadata data model. It has come to be used as a general method for conceptual description or modeling of information that is implemented in web resources, using a variety of syntax formats. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_Description_Framework">Wikipedia article: RDF</a>)

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resource description and access

Resource Description and Access or RDA is a set of instructions for the cataloguing of books and other materials held in libraries and other cultural organizations such as museums and galleries. RDA is the successor to the second edition of the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR2), the current standard set of cataloguing guidelines for English language libraries. It was initially released in summer 2010, and in the United States, following widespread controversy amongst cataloguers, the three national libraries (Library of Congress, National Library of Medicine, and the National Agricultural Library) organized a nation-wide test of the new standards. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_Description_and_Access">Wikipedia article: Resource Description and Access</a>)

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resource discovery

Resource discovery encompasses locating and retrieving information in large, complex networked environments, including the internet. As volume increases year on year, digital information can be increasingly hard to find. JISC's resource discovery work seeks to provide advanced technical solutions that can help users within academia find their way through volumes of information, and more easily access published material. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/topics/resourcediscovery.aspx">this source</a>)

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resource management

In organizational studies, resource management is the efficient and effective deployment for an organization's resources when they are needed. Such resources may include financial resources, inventory, human skills, production resources, or information technology (IT). (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_management">Wikipedia article: Resource management</a>)

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resource sharing

In computing, a shared resource or network share is a device or piece of information on a computer that can be remotely accessed from another computer, typically via a local area network or an enterprise Intranet, transparently as if it were a resource in the local machine. Examples are shared file access (also known as disk sharing and folder sharing), shared printer access (printer sharing), shared scanner access, etc. The shared resource is called a shared disk (also known as mounted disk), shared drive volume, shared folder, shared file, shared document, shared printer or shared scanner. The term file sharing traditionally means shared file access, especially in the context of operating systems and LAN and Intranet services, for example in Microsoft Windows documentation. Though, as BitTorrent and similar applications became available in the early 2000's, the term file sharing increasingly has become associated with peer-to-peer file sharing over the Internet. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shared_resource">Wikipedia article: Resource sharing</a>)

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responsive design

Responsive Web Design (RWD) essentially indicates that a web site is crafted to use Cascading Style Sheets 3 media queries, an extension of the @media rule , with fluid proportion-based grids (which use percentages and EMs instead of pixels) , to adapt the layout to the viewing environment, and probably also use flexible images. As a result, users across a broad range of devices and browsers will have access to a single source of content, laid out so as to be easy to read and navigate with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling. "Mobile First" and "Progressive Enhancement / Unobtrusive JavaScript" (strategies for when a new site design is being considered) are related concepts that predated RWD: browsers of basic mobile phones do not understand media queries or Javascript, and it is wise to create a basic web site then enhance it for smart phones and PCs — rather than attempt "graceful degradation" to try to degrade a complex, image-heavy site to work on the most basic mobile phones. Browser detection and mobile device detection are two ways of deducing if Javascript and certain HTML and CSS features are supported, however Javascript libraries like Modernizr, jQuery, and jQuery Mobile that directly test for features/user agents are also popular. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Responsive_Web_Design">Wikipedia article: Responsive design</a>)

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