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Overview of all keyword tags in articles

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This page provides an overview of 1283 tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of tags and narrow the focus to specific items of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factor Charts

university of sheffield

The University of Sheffield is a leading research university based in the city of Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. It is one of the original 'red brick' universities and is a member of the Russell Group of leading research intensive universities. It was ranked 40th in the world's top 100 universities by the Global University Ranking Study 2009 and is consistently ranked amongst the top 20 universities in the United Kingdom and Europe according to The Good University Guide. It was the Sunday Times University of the Year in 2001. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: University of Sheffield)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 4.2%.
73 113 3.6

library management systems

An integrated library system (ILS), also known as a library management system (LMS), is an enterprise resource planning system for a library, used to track items owned, orders made, bills paid, and patrons who have borrowed. An ILS usually comprises a relational database, software to interact with that database, and two graphical user interfaces (one for patrons, one for staff). Most ILSes separate software functions into discrete programs called modules, each of them integrated with a unified interface. Examples of modules might include: acquisitions (ordering, receiving, and invoicing materials); cataloging (classifying and indexing materials); circulation (lending materials to patrons and receiving them back); serials (tracking magazine and newspaper holdings); the OPAC (public interface for users). Each patron and item has a unique ID in the database that allows the ILS to track its activity. Larger libraries use an ILS to order and acquire, receive and invoice, catalog, circulate, track and shelve materials. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Library management system)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 4.4%.
76 246 3.6

youtube

YouTube is a video-sharing website on which users can upload, share, and view videos, created by three former PayPal employees in February 2005. YouTube is a video-sharing website on which users can upload, share, and view videos, created by three former PayPal employees in February 2005. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: YouTube)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.4%.
59 121 3.4

ipad

The iPad is a line of tablet computers designed, developed and marketed by Apple Inc. primarily as a platform for audio-visual media including books, periodicals, movies, music, games, and web content. Its size and weight falls between those of contemporary smartphones and laptop computers. The iPad runs the same operating system as the iPod Touch and iPhone - and can run its own applications as well as iPhone applications. Without modification, and with the exception of websites, it will only run programs approved by Apple and distributed via its online store. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: IPad)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.2%.
21 129 3.2

apple

Apple Inc. is an American multinational corporation that designs and markets consumer electronics, computer software, and personal computers. The company's best-known hardware products include the Macintosh line of computers, the iPod, the iPhone and the iPad. Apple software includes the Mac OS X operating system; the iTunes media browser; the iLife suite of multimedia and creativity software; the iWork suite of productivity software; Aperture, a professional photography package; Final Cut Studio, a suite of professional audio and film-industry software products; Logic Studio, a suite of music production tools; the Safari internet browser; and iOS, a mobile operating system. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Apple)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.6%.
62 136 3

google

Google Inc. is an American multinational public corporation invested in Internet search, cloud computing, and advertising technologies. Google hosts and develops a number of Internet-based services and products, and generates profit primarily from advertising through its AdWords program. The company was founded by Larry Page and Sergey Brin, often dubbed the "Google Guys", while the two were attending Stanford University as PhD candidates. It was first incorporated as a privately held company on September 4, 1998, and its initial public offering followed on August 19, 2004. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Google)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 17.9%.
313 1269 3

niso

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) is a United States non-profit standards organization that develops, maintains and publishes technical standards related to publishing, bibliographic and library applications. It was founded in 1939, incorporated as a not-for-profit education association in 1983, and assumed its current name in 1984. NISO approved standards are published by ANSI. Unlike most other ANSI standards, many NISO standards are freely available from its web site. Designations (names) of NISO standards all start with "ANSI/NISO Z39." In addition to formal standards, NISO also publishes recommended practices, technical reports and other consensus documents. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: National Information Standards Organization)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.8%.
48 131 3

university of glasgow

The University of Glasgow is the fourth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's four ancient universities. Located in Glasgow, the university was founded in 1451 and is presently one of seventeen British higher education institutions ranked amongst the top 100 of the world. A major centre of the Scottish Enlightenment during the 18th century, from the 19th century it became a pioneer in British higher education by providing for the educational needs of students from the growing urban and commercial classes, as opposed to the upper class. Glasgow served these students by preparing them for professions outwith commerce - the law, medicine, teaching, and the church. It also trained smaller numbers for careers in science and engineering. More recently it was the Sunday Times "Scottish University of the Year" for 2007 and the university is currently a member of the Russell Group and of Universitas 21. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: University of Glasgow)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 4.4%.
76 134 3

aggregation

In computing, a feed aggregator, also known as a feed reader, news reader, RSS reader or simply aggregator, is client software or a Web application which aggregates syndicated web content such as news headlines, blogs, podcasts, and vlogs in a single location for easy viewing. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Aggregation). See our disambiguation glossary for explanations of how 'Aggregation' is used in various contexts.

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 8.1%.
142 306 3

social software

Social software applications include communication tools and interactive tools. Communication tools typically handle the capturing, storing and presentation of communication, usually written but increasingly including audio and video as well. Interactive tools handle mediated interactions between a pair or group of users. They focus on establishing and maintaining a connection among users, facilitating the mechanics of conversation and talk. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Social software)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.2%.
21 36 2.8

sparql

SPARQL (pronounced "sparkle") is an RDF query language; its name is a recursive acronym that stands for SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language. It was standardized by the RDF Data Access Working Group (DAWG) of the World Wide Web Consortium, and is considered a key semantic web technology. On 15 January 2008, SPARQL became an official W3C Recommendation. SPARQL allows for a query to consist of triple patterns, conjunctions, disjunctions, and optional patterns. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: SPARQL)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.6%.
11 36 2.8

database

A database is a system intended to organize, store, and retrieve large amounts of data easily. It consists of an organized collection of data for one or more uses, typically in digital form. One way of classifying databases involves the type of their contents, for example: bibliographic, document-text, statistical. Digital databases are managed using database management systems, which store database contents, allowing data creation and maintenance, and search and other access. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Database)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 45.3%.
790 3295 2.7

software

Computer software, or just software, is a collection of computer programs and related data that provide the instructions telling a computer what to do and how to do it. We can also say software refers to one or more computer programs and data held in the storage of the computer for some purposes. In other words software is a set of programs, procedures, algorithms and its documentation. Program software performs the function of the program it implements, either by directly providing instructions to the computer hardware or by serving as input to another piece of software. The term was coined to contrast to the old term hardware (meaning physical devices). In contrast to hardware, software is intangible, meaning it "cannot be touched" (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Software)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 50.9%.
888 3558 2.7

tablet computer

A tablet computer, or simply tablet, is a one-piece mobile computer. Devices typically have a touchscreen, with finger or stylus gestures replacing the conventional computer mouse. It is often supplemented by physical buttons or input from sensors such as accelerometers. An on-screen, hideable virtual keyboard is usually used for typing. Tablets differentiate themselves by being larger than smart phones or personal digital assistants. They are usually 7 inches (18 cm) or larger, measured diagonally. Though generally self-contained, a tablet computer may be connected to a physical keyboard or other input device. A number of hybrids that have detachable keyboards have been sold since the mid-1990s. Convertible touchscreen notebook computers have an integrated keyboard that can be hidden by a swivel or slide joint. Booklet tablets have dual-touchscreens and can be used as a notebook by displaying a virtual keyboard on one of the displays. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Tablet computer)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 37 2.7

web standards

Web standards is a general term for the formal standards and other technical specifications that define and describe aspects of the World Wide Web. In recent years, the term has been more frequently associated with the trend of endorsing a set of standardized best practices for building web sites, and a philosophy of web design and development that includes those methods. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web standards)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.3%.
22 39 2.6

wikipedia

Wikipedia is a free, web-based, collaborative, multilingual encyclopedia project supported by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation. Its 18 million articles (over 3.6 million in English) have been written collaboratively by volunteers around the world, and almost all of its articles can be edited by anyone with access to the site. Wikipedia was launched in 2001 by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger and has become the largest and most popular general reference work on the Internet, ranking around seventh among all websites on Alexa and having 365 million readers. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Wikipedia)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 5.5%.
96 360 2.4

rsp

The Repositories Support Project (RSP) began as a 2.5 year project to co-ordinate and deliver good practice and practical advice to English and Welsh HEIs to enable the implementation, management and development of digital institutional repositories. The second, 3-year phase, began in March 2009. The RSP will contribute to building repository capacity, knowledge and skills within institutions. Through providing guidance and advice it will benefit the whole of the UK sector resulting in the wider take-up and development of institutional repositories in HEIs. The aim of the RSP is to progress the vision of a deployed network of inter-working repositories for academic papers, learning materials and research data across the UK. Whilst fulfilling the business requirements of HEIs to manage their assets, showcase research outputs, and share learning materials, such a network of populated repositories will be a major step forward in the provision of open access materials. As basic objectives of the project it has been agreed with JISC that the RSP should provide activities, support and advice, to achieve: * More repositories * More content in repositories * More use of content by researchers. *More re-use of that content by service providers offering innovative services *Wide-spread acceptance and use of standards-based approach to repository development and use. The First Phase of the project ran from October 2006 until March 2009, under the Repositories and Preservation Programme (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/reppres.aspx ), and was a consortium of the University of Nottingham, University of Wales Aberystwyth, University of Southampton, and UKOLN. The Second Phase of the project runs from March 2009 until March 2012, and is being carried out by the Centre for Research Communications at the University of Nottingham. Project start date: 2006-10-01. Project end date: 2012-03-30. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.6%.
10 43 2.3

augmented reality

Augmented reality (AR) is a term for a live direct or an indirect view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are augmented by computer-generated sensory input, such as sound or graphics. It is related to a more general concept called mediated reality, in which a view of reality is modified (possibly even diminished rather than augmented) by a computer. As a result, the technology functions by enhancing one's current perception of reality. By contrast, virtual reality replaces the real world with a simulated one. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Augmented reality)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.6%.
11 44 2.3

operating system

An operating system (OS) is software, consisting of programs and data, that runs on computers, manages computer hardware resources, and provides common services for execution of various application software. For hardware functions such as input and output and memory allocation, the operating system acts as an intermediary between application programs and the computer hardware, although the application code is usually executed directly by the hardware and will frequently call the OS or be interrupted by it. Operating systems are found on almost any device that contains a computer - from cellular phones and video game consoles to supercomputers and web servers. Examples of popular modern operating systems for personal computers are: Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, and Unix. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Operating system)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 5.8%.
101 184 2.2

privacy

Privacy is the ability of an individual or group to seclude themselves or information about themselves and thereby reveal themselves selectively. The boundaries and content of what is considered private differ among cultures and individuals, but share basic common themes. Privacy is sometimes related to anonymity, the wish to remain unnoticed or unidentified in the public realm. When something is private to a person, it usually means there is something within them that is considered inherently special or personally sensitive. The degree to which private information is exposed therefore depends on how the public will receive this information, which differs between places and over time. Privacy partially intersects security, including for instance the concepts of appropriate use, as well as protection, of information. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Privacy)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 6%.
105 187 2.2
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by Dr. Radut