Overview of all keyword tags in articles

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This page provides an overview of 1387 tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of tags and narrow the focus to specific items of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Charts

linked data

Linked Data describes a method of publishing structured data, so that it can be interlinked and become more useful. It builds upon standard Web technologies, such as HTTP and URIs - but rather than using them to serve web pages for human readers, it extends them to share information in a way that can be read automatically by computers. This enables data from different sources to be connected and queried. Tim Berners-Lee, director of the World Wide Web Consortium, coined the term in a design note discussing issues around the Semantic Web project. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linked_Data">Wikipedia article: Linked Data</a>)

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linux

Linux refers to the family of Unix-like computer operating systems using the Linux kernel. Linux can be installed on a wide variety of computer hardware, ranging from mobile phones, tablet computers and video game consoles, to mainframes and supercomputers. Linux is a leading server operating system, and runs the 10 fastest supercomputers in the world. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux">Wikipedia article: Linux</a>)

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local storage

What I will refer to as 'HTML5 Storage' is a specification named Web Storage, which was at one time part of the HTML5 specification proper, but was split out into its own specification for uninteresting political reasons. Certain browser vendors also refer to it as 'Local Storage' or 'DOM Storage.' Simply put, it's a way for web pages to store named key/value pairs locally, within the client web browser. Like cookies, this data persists even after you navigate away from the web site, close your browser tab, exit your browser, or what have you. Unlike cookies, this data is never transmitted to the remote web server (unless you go out of your way to send it manually). Unlike all previous attempts at providing persistent local storage, it is implemented natively in web browsers, so it is available even when third-party browser plugins are not. (Excerpt from <a href="/wiki/Web_Storage">this source</a>)

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location-based services

A location-based service (LBS) is an information or entertainment service, accessible with mobile devices through the mobile network and utilizing the ability to make use of the geographical position of the mobile device . LBS can be used in a variety of contexts, such as health, indoor object search, entertainment, work, personal life, etc. LBS include services to identify a location of a person or object, such as discovering the nearest banking cash machine or the whereabouts of a friend or employee. LBS include parcel tracking and vehicle tracking services. LBS can include mobile commerce when taking the form of coupons or advertising directed at customers based on their current location. They include personalized weather services and even location-based games. They are an example of telecommunication convergence. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Location-based_service">Wikipedia article: Location-based service</a>)

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lod

Linked Open Data (LOD) is part of the Open Data Movement, which aims to make data freely available to everyone. There are already various interesting open data sets available on the Web. Examples include Wikipedia, Wikibooks, Geonames, MusicBrainz, WordNet, the DBLP bibliography and many more which are published under Creative Commons or Talis licenses. The goal of the W3C SWEO Linking Open Data community project is to extend the Web with a data commons by publishing various open data sets as RDF on the Web and by setting RDF links between data items from different data sources. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.w3.org/wiki/SweoIG/TaskForces/CommunityProjects/LinkingOpenDa... source</a>)

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lom

Learning Object Metadata is a data model, usually encoded in XML, used to describe a learning object and similar digital resources used to support learning. The purpose of learning object metadata is to support the reusability of learning objects, to aid discoverability, and to facilitate their interoperability, usually in the context of online learning management systems (LMS). (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_object_metadata">Wikipedia article: Learning Object Metadata</a>)

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lucene

Apache Lucene is a free/open source information retrieval software library, originally created in Java by Doug Cutting. It is supported by the Apache Software Foundation and is released under the Apache Software License. Lucene has been ported to other programming languages including Delphi, Perl, C#, C++, Python, Ruby and PHP. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucene">Wikipedia article: Lucene</a>)

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lzw

Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) is a universal lossless data compression algorithm created by Abraham Lempel, Jacob Ziv, and Terry Welch. It was published by Welch in 1984 as an improved implementation of the LZ78 algorithm published by Lempel and Ziv in 1978. The algorithm is simple to implement, and has the potential for very high throughput in hardware implementations. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lempel-Ziv-Welch">Wikipedia article: LZW</a>)

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mac os

Mac OS X is a series of Unix-based operating systems and graphical user interfaces developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. Since 2002, Mac OS X has been included with all new Macintosh computer systems. It is the successor to Mac OS 9, released in 1999, the final release of the "classic" Mac OS, which had been Apple's primary operating system since 1984. Mac OS X, whose X is the Roman numeral for 10 and is a prominent part of its brand identity, is a Unix-based graphical operating system, built on technologies developed at NeXT between the second half of the 1980s and Apple's purchase of the company in late 1996. From its sixth release, Mac OS X v10.5 "Leopard" and onward, every release of Mac OS X gained UNIX 03 certification while running on Intel processors. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_os_x">Wikipedia article: Mac OS X</a>)

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machine learning

Machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence, is a scientific discipline concerned with the design and development of algorithms that allow computers to evolve behaviors based on empirical data, such as from sensor data or databases. A learner can take advantage of examples (data) to capture characteristics of interest of their unknown underlying probability distribution. Data can be seen as examples that illustrate relations between observed variables. A major focus of machine learning research is to automatically learn to recognize complex patterns and make intelligent decisions based on data; the difficulty lies in the fact that the set of all possible behaviors given all possible inputs is too large to be covered by the set of observed examples (training data). Hence the learner must generalize from the given examples, so as to be able to produce a useful output in new cases. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machine_learning">Wikipedia article: Machine learning</a>)

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machine-readable data

Machine-readable data is data (or metadata) which is in a format that can be understood by a computer. There are two types; human-readable data that is marked up so that it can also be read by machines (examples; microformats, RDFa) or data file formats intended principally for machines (RDF, XML, JSON). (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machine-readable_data">Wikipedia article: Machine-readable data</a>)

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mailbase

Mailbase was the UK's major electronic mailing list service for HE staff. It enables groups of academics, researchers and support staff to communicate and collaborate using Mailbase lists. Groups use Mailbase for: informal discussion; advertising vacant posts; queries and enquiries; co-authoring papers; distributing research material and data; advertising conferences and seminars; locating colleagues with a similar specialist interest; electronic meetings. Mailbase was run by a team based in the Computing Service at the University of Newcastle and is funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) of the Higher Education Funding Councils of England, Scotland and Wales and the Department of Education for Northern Ireland. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/cebe/Documents/resources/habitat/mailb... source</a>)

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managed learning environment

A virtual learning environment (VLE) is a system designed to support teaching and learning in an educational setting, as distinct from a Managed Learning Environment (MLE), where the focus is on management. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_learning_environment">Wikipedia article: Managed Learning Environment</a>)

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managerialism

Managerialism is the ideological principle that societies are equivalent to the sum of the transactions made by the managements of organizations. "The main origin of Managerialism lay in the human relations movement that took root at the Harvard Business School in the 1920s and 1930s under the guiding hand of Professor Elton Mayo. Mayo, an immigrant from Australia, saw democracy as divisive and lacking in community spirit. He looked to corporate managers to restore the social harmony that he believed the uprooting experiences of immigration and industrialization had destroyed and that democracy was incapable of repairing. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Managerialism">Wikipedia article: Managerialism</a>)

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marc

MARC is an acronym, used in the field of library science, that stands for MAchine-Readable Cataloging. The MARC standards consist of the MARC formats, which are standards for the representation and communication of bibliographic and related information in machine-readable form, and related documentation. It defines a bibliographic data format that was developed by Henriette Avram at the Library of Congress beginning in the 1960s. It provides the protocol by which computers exchange, use, and interpret bibliographic information. Its data elements make up the foundation of most library catalogs used today. The record structure of MARC is an implementation of ISO 2709, also known as ANSI/NISO Z39.2. MARC records are composed of three elements: the record structure, the content designation, and the data content of the record. The record structure implements national and international standards (e.g., Z39.2, ISO2709). The content designation is "the codes and conventions established to identify explicitly and characterize ... data elements within a record" and support their manipulation. The content of data elements in MARC records is defined by standards outside the formats such as AACR2, L.C. Subject Headings, and MeSH. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MARC_standards">Wikipedia article: MARC standards</a>)

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marc21

MARC is an acronym, used in the field of library science, that stands for MAchine-Readable Cataloging. The MARC standards consist of the MARC formats, which are standards for the representation and communication of bibliographic and related information in machine-readable form, and related documentation. It defines a bibliographic data format that was developed by Henriette Avram at the Library of Congress beginning in the 1960s. It provides the protocol by which computers exchange, use, and interpret bibliographic information. Its data elements make up the foundation of most library catalogs used today. The record structure of MARC is an implementation of ISO 2709, also known as ANSI/NISO Z39.2. MARC records are composed of three elements: the record structure, the content designation, and the data content of the record. The record structure implements national and international standards (e.g., Z39.2, ISO2709). The content designation is "the codes and conventions established to identify explicitly and characterize ... data elements within a record" and support their manipulation. The content of data elements in MARC records is defined by standards outside the formats such as AACR2, L.C. Subject Headings, and MeSH. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MARC_standards">Wikipedia article: MARC standards</a>)

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mashup

In Web development, a mashup is a Web page or application that uses and combines data, presentation or functionality from two or more sources to create new services. The term implies easy, fast integration, frequently using open APIs and data sources to produce enriched results that were not necessarily the original reason for producing the raw source data. The main characteristics of the mashup are combination, visualization, and aggregation. It is important to make existing data more useful, moreover for personal and professional use. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mashup_(web_application_hybrid)">Wikipedia article: Mashup</a>)

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mathml

Mathematical Markup Language (MathML) is an application of XML for describing mathematical notations and capturing both its structure and content. It aims at integrating mathematical formulae into World Wide Web pages and other documents. It is a recommendation of the W3C math working group. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MathML">Wikipedia article: MathML</a>)

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medical subject headings

Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a comprehensive controlled vocabulary for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences; it can also serve as a thesaurus that facilitates searching. Created and updated by the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM), it is used by the MEDLINE/PubMed article database and by NLM's catalog of book holdings. MeSH can be browsed and downloaded free of charge on the Internet through PubMed. The yearly printed version was discontinued in 2007 and MeSH is now available online only. Originally in English, MeSH has been translated into numerous other languages and allows retrieval of documents from different languages. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_Subject_Headings">Wikipedia article: Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)</a>)

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metadata

Metadata can be defined literally as "data about data," but the term is normally understood to mean structured data about digital (and non-digital) resources that can be used to help support a wide range of operations. These might include, for example, resource description and discovery, the management of information resources (including rights management) and their long-term preservation. In the context of digital resources, there exists a wide variety of metadata formats. Viewed on a continuum of increasing complexity, these range from the basic records used by robot-based Internet search services, through relatively simple formats like the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set (DCMES) and the more detailed Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) header and MARC formats, to highly specific formats like the FGDC Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata, the Encoded Archival Description (EAD) and the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI) Codebook. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/metadata/">this source</a>)

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