Overview of all keyword tags in articles

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This page provides an overview of 1387 tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of tags and narrow the focus to specific items of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

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brightsolid

Founded in 1995 brightsolid is one of the UK’s pioneering internet companies and a leading online publishing and online technology business. We provide innovative online solutions to our customers, whether that is a FTSE100 company requiring absolute reliability and performance in their IT infrastructure or a consumer researching their family history from the comfort of their home. Two main operating businesses are: online publishing; online technology. brightsolid online innovation is owned by Publisher DC Thomson (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.brightsolid.com/home/about-brightsolid/">this source</a>)

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brii

BRII will enable efficient sharing of research management information using semantic web technologies. Ontologies and taxonomies will define and describe data objects (eg people, research groups, funding agencies, publications, research 'themes') to forge connections between them and provide web-based services to disseminate and reuse this information in new contexts. It will create efficiencies, greater accuracy of data, and better discovery of research activities at Oxford. University data sources will include academic departments and central services. Half the project will be devoted to stakeholder input, collaboration and 'buy-in' aimed at evolving current work practices and processes. Project start date: 2008-11-03. Project end date: 2010-04-03. (Excerpt from <a href="http://brii.medsci.ox.ac.uk">this source</a>)

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bril

The Randall Division of Cell and Molecular Biophysics is a strongly interdisciplinary research division in the School of Biomedical & Health Sciences at King's College London. The Division includes a variety of research groups addressing different topics within this field. The BRIL project aims to enhance the repository facilities at the Randall Division by: o Embedding the repository within the researchers' day-to-day research and experimental practices. o Allowing data and metadata to be captured in automated fashion, for example from equipment or processing and analysis software o Allowing the structure of experimental processes as a whole to be captured, modelled and stored within the repository, rather than just the individual data sets. o Enhancing browse and access facilities so that users can explore and re-use these complex representations, and data exchange facilities to increase interoperability with other repositories in biomedical disciplines. o Integrating the repository into the wider King's infrastructure, and in particular the Institutional preservation practices and policies As well as enhancing this specific repository to address the needs and practices of the targeted research groups, we will also ensure that the architecture and software components produced are sufficiently generic and can be exploited and enhanced in other disciplines and institutions. Project start date: 2009-04-01. Project end date: 2011-03-01. (Excerpt from <a href="https://pims.jisc.ac.uk/projects/view/1308">this source</a>)

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british antarctic survey

The British Antarctic Survey (BAS) is the United Kingdom's national Antarctic operation and has an active role in Antarctic affairs. BAS is part of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and has over 400 staff. It operates five research stations, two ships and five aircraft in and around Antarctica. BAS addresses key global and regional issues. This involves joint research projects with over 40 UK universities and more than 120 national and international collaborations. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Antarctic_Survey">Wikipedia article: British Antarctic Survey</a>)

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british library

The British Library is the library of the United Kingdom, and one of the world's largest libraries in terms of total number of items. The library is a major research library, holding over 150 million items from every country in the world, in virtually all known languages and in many formats, both print and digital: books, manuscripts, journals, newspapers, magazines, sound and music recordings, videos, play-scripts, patents, databases, maps, stamps, prints, drawings. The Library's collections include around 14 million books (second only to the USA's Library of Congress), along with substantial holdings of manuscripts and historical items dating back as far as 2000 BC. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_library">Wikipedia article: British Library</a>)

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british medical association

The British Medical Association (BMA) is the professional association and registered trade union for doctors in the United Kingdom. The association does not regulate or certify doctors, a responsibility which lies with the General Medical Council. The association’s headquarters are located in BMA House, Tavistock Square, London. Additionally, the Association has national offices in Cardiff, Belfast, and Edinburgh, a European office in Brussels and a number of offices in English regions. The BMA has a range of representative and scientific committees and is recognised by National Health Service employers as sole contract negotiators for doctors. The aim for the BMA is "to promote the medical and allied sciences, and to maintain the honour and interests of the medical profession". (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Medical_Association">Wikipedia article: British Medical Association</a>)

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british museum

The British Museum is a museum of human history and culture in London. Its collections, which number more than seven million objects, are amongst the largest and most comprehensive in the world and originate from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its beginnings to the present. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Museum">Wikipedia article: British Museum</a>)

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british oceanographic data centre

The British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) is a national facility for looking after and distributing data about the marine environment. BODC deal with a range of physical, chemical and biological data, which help scientists provide answers to both local questions (such as the likelihood of coastal flooding) and global issues (such as the impact of climate change). BODC is the designated marine science data centre for the UK’s Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). The centre provides a resource for science, education and industry, as well as the general public. BODC is hosted by the National Oceanography Centre (NOC), Liverpool. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Oceanographic_Data_Centre">Wikipedia article: British Oceanographic Data Centre</a>)

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broker

A broker is a structured network service that provides (search) access to a range of other, heterogeneous, local or remote structured network services. Brokers are intended for use by software applications. In the context of the JISC IE, brokers interact with indexes, catalogues, aggregators, content providers, other brokers and portals using Z39.50. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/distributed-systems/jisc-ie/arch/glossary/">JISC Information Environment Glossary</a>)

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browser

A web browser or Internet browser is a software application for retrieving, presenting, and traversing information resources on the World Wide Web. An information resource is identified by a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) and may be a web page, image, video, or other piece of content. Hyperlinks present in resources enable users to easily navigate their browsers to related resources. Although browsers are primarily intended to access the World Wide Web, they can also be used to access information provided by Web servers in private networks or files in file systems. Some browsers can also be used to save information resources to file systems. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_browser">Wikipedia article: web browser</a>)

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brunel university

Brunel University is a higher education institution situated in Uxbridge, West London, England. In the latest Government Research Assessment Exercise, 82% of research submitted was rated as of international standing. The university has recently spent &pound;250 million redeveloping its campus, including new and refurbished social, teaching and sporting facilities. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brunel_University">Wikipedia article: Brunel University</a>)

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bs8878

Web accessibility refers to the inclusive practice of making websites usable by people of all abilities and disabilities. When sites are correctly designed, developed and edited, all users can have equal access to information and functionality. For example, when a site is coded with semantically meaningful HTML, with textual equivalents provided for images and with links named meaningfully, this helps blind users using text-to-speech software and/or text-to-Braille hardware. When text and images are large and/or enlargable, it is easier for users with poor sight to read and understand the content. When links are underlined (or otherwise differentiated) as well as coloured, this ensures that color blind users will be able to notice them. When clickable links and areas are large, this helps users who cannot control a mouse with precision. When pages are coded so that users can navigate by means of the keyboard alone, or a single switch access device alone, this helps users who cannot use a mouse or even a standard keyboard. When videos are closed captioned or a sign language version is available, deaf and hard of hearing users can understand the video. When flashing effects are avoided or made optional, users prone to seizures caused by these effects are not put at risk. And when content is written in plain language and illustrated with instructional diagrams and animations, users with dyslexia and learning difficulties are better able to understand the content. When sites are correctly built and maintained, all of these users can be accommodated while not impacting on the usability of the site for non-disabled users. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_accessibility">Wikipedia article: BS 8878</a>)

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bsd

Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD, sometimes called Berkeley Unix) is a UNIX operating system derivative developed and distributed by the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California, Berkeley, from 1977 to 1995. Historically, BSD has been considered a branch of UNIX - "BSD UNIX", because it shared the initial codebase and design with the original AT&T UNIX operating system. In the 1980s, BSD was widely adopted by vendors of workstation-class systems in the form of proprietary UNIX variants such as DEC ULTRIX and Sun Microsystems SunOS. This can be attributed to the ease with which it could be licensed, and the familiarity it found among the founders of many technology companies of this era. Though these proprietary BSD derivatives were largely superseded by the UNIX System V Release 4 and OSF/1 systems in the 1990s (both of which incorporated BSD code), later BSD releases provided a basis for several open source development projects that continue to this day. Today, the term "BSD" is often non-specifically used to refer to any of these BSD descendants, e.g., FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD or DragonFly, which together form a branch of the family of Unix-like operating systems. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_Software_Distribution">Wikipedia article: BSD</a>)

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bsd licence

BSD licenses are a family of permissive free software licenses. The original license was used for the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD), a Unix-like operating system after which it is named. The original owners of BSD were the Regents of the University of California because BSD was first written at the University of California, Berkeley. The first version of the license was revised, and the resulting licenses are more properly called modified BSD licenses. Two variants of the license, the New BSD License/Modified BSD License, and the Simplified BSD License/FreeBSD License have been verified as GPL-compatible free software licenses by the Free Software Foundation, and have been vetted as open source licenses by the Open Source Initiative, while the original, 4-clause license has not been accepted as an open source license and, although the original is considered to be a free software license by the FSF, the FSF does not consider it to be compatible with the GPL due to the advertising clause. The licenses have fewer restrictions on distribution compared to other free software licenses such as the GNU General Public License or even the default restrictions provided by copyright, putting works licensed under them relatively closer to the public domain. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BSD_licenses">Wikipedia article: BSD license</a>)

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bsi

BSI Group, also known in its home market as the British Standards Institution (or BSI), is a multinational business services provider whose principal activity is the production of standards and the supply of standards-related services. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Standards_Institution">Wikipedia article: BSI</a>)

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bufvc

The British Universities Film & Video Council (BUFVC) is a representative body promoting the production, study and use of moving image, sound and related media for learning and research. It is a Limited Company of Charity status serving post compulsory education interests in the UK. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Universities_Film_%26_Video_Council... article: BUFVC</a>)

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business process modelling

Business Process Modeling (BPM) in systems engineering and hardware engineering is the activity of representing processes of an enterprise, so that the current process may be analyzed and improved. BPM is typically performed by business analysts and managers who are seeking to improve process efficiency and quality. The process improvements identified by BPM may or may not require Information Technology involvement, although that is a common driver for the need to model a business process, by creating a process master. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_process_modelling">Wikipedia article: Business process modelling</a>)

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bvreh

The BVREH is a project supported by the Humanities Division at Oxford, hosted by the Oxford e-Research Centre, and funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), which promotes the innovative use of information and communications technology in academic teaching and research in the UK. An initial survey carried out by the BVREH team between June 2005 and September 2006 defined the range of services that a Virtual Environment should offer - from information about researchers and their interests and about conferences, lectures and seminars, to integrated communication and collaboration tools to support advanced research. The project team addressed the needs highlighted by the survey through a number of pilot applications designed for specific user communities with the long term aim of broadening their functionality to a wider humanities user base. (Excerpt from <a href="http://bvreh.humanities.ox.ac.uk/">this source</a>)

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c programming

C is a general-purpose computer programming language developed between 1969 and 1973 by Dennis Ritchie at the Bell Telephone Laboratories for use with the Unix operating system. Although C was designed for implementing system software, it is also widely used for developing portable application software. C is one of the most popular programming languages of all time and there are very few computer architectures for which a C compiler does not exist. C has greatly influenced many other popular programming languages, most notably C++, which began as an extension to C. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_(Programming_Language)">Wikipedia article: C programming language</a>)

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cache

In computer engineering, a cache is a component that transparently stores data so that future requests for that data can be served faster. The data that is stored within a cache might be values that have been computed earlier or duplicates of original values that are stored elsewhere. If requested data is contained in the cache (cache hit), this request can be served by simply reading the cache, which is comparatively faster. Otherwise (cache miss), the data has to be recomputed or fetched from its original storage location, which is comparatively slower. Hence, the more requests can be served from the cache the faster the overall system performance is. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cache">Wikipedia article: Cache</a>)

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