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Overview of all keyword tags in articles

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This page provides an overview of 1282 tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of tags and narrow the focus to specific items of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factor Charts

virtual research environment

A virtual research environment (VREs) or virtual laboratory is an online system helping researchers collaborate. Features usually include collaboration support (forums and wikis), document hosting, and some discipline-specific tools, such as data analysis, visualisation, or simulation management. In some instances, publication management, and teaching tools such as presentations and slides may be included. VREs have become important in fields where research is primarily carried out in teams which span institutions and even countries: the ability to easily share information and research results is valuable. The concept of the VRE was studied by UK funding agency JISC in 2010 which highlighted issues such as researcher involvement in VRE design, sustainability, and consideration of the project as primarily one of community building rather than technology. The report also noted synonyms such as "collaborative e-research community", "collaboratory" and "virtual research community". JISC funded development of a number of VREs under its "Virtual research environment programme" from 2004 to 2011. In Australia, e-Research body NeCTAR has funding for a "virtual laboratory" program to be allocated in 2011. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Virtual research environment)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.3%.
22 234

vml

Vector Markup Language (VML) is a deprecated XML language used to produce vector graphics. VML was submitted as a proposed standard to the W3C in 1998 by Autodesk, Hewlett-Packard, Macromedia, Microsoft, and Visio. Around the same time other competing W3C submissions were received in the area of web vector graphics, such as PGML from Adobe Systems, Sun Microsystems, and others. As a result of these submissions, a new W3C working group was created, which produced Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG). SVG became a W3C Recommendation in 2001 as a language for describing two-dimensional vector and mixed vector/raster graphics in XML. VML has been largely deprecated in favor of other formats, such as SVG. SVG is not compatible with VML. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

vra

The Visual Resources Association (also known as VRA) is an international organization for image media professionals, VRA was founded in 1982 by slide librarians (visual resources curators) who were members of the College Art Association (CAA), the South Eastern Art Conference (SECAC), the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA), and the Mid-America College Art Association (MACAA). The association is concerned with creating, describing, and distributing digital images and other media; educating image professionals; and developing standards. The Visual Resources Association Foundation, a 501 C-3 organization created by the VRA, supports research and education in visual resources, and provides educational, literary, and scientific outreach to the archival and library community and the general public. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VRA)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 5

vra core

Since the 1980s, Visual Resources Association has worked on creating standards to describe images. To replace the earlier widely varying practices, the association created a common standard, the VRA Core Categories. Somewhat based on the Dublin Core model, the Core has grown from a list of elements describing art and architectural images to a data standard (with an XML schema to promote the sharing of records) for describing images. The first version was published in 1996, with revisions in 1998, 2002, 2004, and 2007 (resulting in the current version, 4.0.). In November 2010, the Network Development and MARC Standards Office of the Library of Congress began hosting VRA Core 4 in partnership with the VRA. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VRA Core)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 5

vt100

VT100 is a video terminal that was made by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC). Its detailed attributes became the de facto standard for terminal emulators. It was introduced in August 1978, following its predecessor, the VT52, and communicated with its host system over serial lines using the ASCII character set and control sequences (a.k.a. escape sequences) standardized by ANSI. The VT100 was also the first Digital mass-market terminal to incorporate "graphic renditions" (blinking, bolding, reverse video, and underlining) as well as a selectable 80 or 132 column display. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VT100)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 6

vufind

VuFind is an open source library search engine that allows users to search and browse beyond the resources of a traditional OPAC. Developed by Villanova University, version 1.0 was released in July 2010 after two years in beta. VuFind operates with a simple, Google-like interface and offers flexible keyword searching. While most commonly used for searching catalog records, VuFind can be extended to search other library resources including but not limited to: locally cached journals, digital library items, and institutional repository and bibliography. The software is also modular and highly configurable, allowing implementers to choose system components to best fit their needs. As of March 2012, a total of 64 institutions are running live instances of Vufind including the Georgia Tech Library, the London School of Economics, the National Library of Ireland, Yale University, and the DC Public Library. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VuFind)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 87

warc

The Web ARChive (WARC) archive format specifies a method for combining multiple digital resources into an aggregate archive file together with related information. The WARC format is a revision of the Internet Archive's ARC File Format [ARC_IA] that has traditionally been used to store "web crawls" as sequences of content blocks harvested from the World Wide Web. The WARC format generalizes the older format to better support the harvesting, access, and exchange needs of archiving organizations. Besides the primary content currently recorded, the revision accommodates related secondary content, such as assigned metadata, abbreviated duplicate detection events, and later-date transformations. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web ARChive)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 6

wav

Waveform Audio File Format (WAVE, or more commonly known as WAV due to its filename extension), (also, but rarely, named, Audio for Windows) is a Microsoft and IBM audio file format standard for storing an audio bitstream on PCs. It is an application of the RIFF bitstream format method for storing data in "chunks", and thus is also close to the 8SVX and the AIFF format used on Amiga and Macintosh computers, respectively. It is the main format used on Windows systems for raw and typically uncompressed audio. The usual bitstream encoding is the linear pulse-code modulation (LPCM) format. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: WAV)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 9

wayback machine

The Wayback Machine is a digital time capsule created by the Internet Archive non-profit organization, based in San Francisco, California. It is maintained with content from Alexa Internet. This service enables users to see archived versions of web pages across time - what the Archive calls a "three dimensional index." Internet Archive bought the domain waybackmachine.org for their own site. It is currently in beta test. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Wayback Machine)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.7%.
12 20

wayf

The Shibboleth 'where are you from service' (WAYF) provides the user with a list of institutional identity providers (IdPs) and allows them to choose at which one they wish to authenticate. The WAYF then redirects the user to the chosen IdP. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

web portal

A web portal or links page is a web site that function as a point of access to information on the World Wide Web. A portal presents information from diverse sources in a unified way. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web portal)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.2%.
21 35

web storage

Web Storage and DOM Storage (Document Object Model) are web application software methods and protocols used for storing data in a web browser. Web storage supports persistent data storage, similar to cookies, as well as window-local storage. Web storage is being standardized by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). It was originally part of the HTML 5 specification, but is now in a separate specification. It is supported by Internet Explorer 8, Mozilla-based browsers (e.g., Firefox 2+, officially from 3.5), Safari 4, Google Chrome 4 (sessionStorage is from 5), and Opera 10.50. As of 14 July 2010 only Opera supports the storage events (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web storage)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

webct

WebCT (Course Tools) or Blackboard Learning System, now owned by Blackboard, is an online proprietary virtual learning environment system that is sold to colleges and other institutions and used in many campuses for e-learning. To their WebCT courses, instructors can add such tools as discussion boards, mail systems, and live chat, along with content including documents and web pages. The latest versions of this software are now called Webcourses. WebCT is significant in that it was the world's first widely successful course management system for higher education. At its height, it was in use by over 10 million students in 80 countries. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: WebCT)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.7%.
12 37

webinar

Web conferencing refers to a service that allows conferencing events to be shared with remote locations. Most vendors also provide either a recorded copy of an event, or a means for a subscriber to record an event. The service allows information to be shared simultaneously, across geographically dispersed locations in nearly real-time. Applications for web conferencing include meetings, training events, lectures, or short presentations from any computer. A participant can be either an individual person or a group. System requirements that allow individuals within a group to participate as individuals (e.g. when an audience participant asks a question) depend on the size of the group. Handling such requirements is often the responsibility of the group. In general, system requirements depend on the vendor. The service is made possible by Internet technologies, particularly on IP/TCP connections. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web conferencing)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 8

webkit

WebKit is a layout engine designed to allow web browsers to render web pages. WebKit powers Google Chrome and Safari, which in January 2011 had around 14% and 6% of browser market share respectively. It is also used as the basis for the experimental browser included with the Amazon Kindle ebook reader. The WebKit engine provides a set of classes to display web content in windows, and implements browser features such as following links when clicked by the user, managing a back-forward list, and managing a history of pages recently visited. WebKit was originally created as a fork of KHTML as the layout engine for Safari; it is portable to many other computing platforms. Mac OS X and Windows are supported by the project. WebKit's WebCore and JavaScriptCore components are available under the GNU Lesser General Public License, and the rest of WebKit is available under a BSD-style license. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: WebKit)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 2

wikimania

Wikimania is an annual international conference for users of the wiki projects operated by the Wikimedia Foundation (such as Wikipedia and other sister projects). Topics of presentations and discussions include Wikimedia Foundation projects, other wikis, open source software, free knowledge and free content, and the different social and technical aspects which relate to these topics. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Wikimania)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 3

wikitude

Wikitude is a mobile application that provides an Augmented reality (AR) platform. Augmented reality overlays virtual vision and information on the real world to enhance human visual perception. Current applications of Wikitude, such as Wikitude World Browser and Wikitude Drive, run on smartphones. These applications can only be used on the iPhone, Android, and Symbian software platforms as travel guides and personal navigation devices. Future applications of Wikitude can be developed for military, city modeling, and shopping. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Wikitude)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 2

windows media

Windows Media is a multimedia framework for media creation and distribution for Microsoft Windows. It consists of a software development kit with several application programming interfaces and a number of prebuilt technologies, and is the replacement of NetShow technologies. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Windows Media)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 15

wireless application profile

Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) is a technical standard for accessing information over a mobile wireless network. A WAP browser is a web browser for mobile devices such as mobile phones (called "cellular phones" in some countries) that uses the protocol. Before the introduction of WAP, mobile service providers had limited opportunities to offer interactive data services, but needed interactivity to support Internet and Web applications such as: email by mobile phone; tracking of stock-market prices; sports results; news headlines; music downloads. The Japanese i-mode system offers another major competing wireless data protocol. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Wireless application profile (WAP))

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.8%.
14 96

wms

Windows Media Services (WMS) is a streaming media server from Microsoft that allows an administrator to generate streaming media (audio/video). Only Windows Media, JPEG, and MP3 formats are supported. WMS is the successor of NetShow Services. In addition to streaming, WMS also has the ability to cache and record streams, enforce authentication, impose various connection limits, restrict access, use multiple protocols, generate usage statistics, and apply forward error correction (FEC). It can also handle a high number of concurrent connections making it ideal[weasel words] for content providers. Streams can also be distributed between servers as part of a distribution network where each server ultimately feeds a different network/audience. Both unicast and multicast streams are supported (multicast streams also utilize a proprietary and partially encrypted Windows Media Station (*.nsc) file for use by a player.) Typically, Windows Media Player is used to decode and watch/listen to the streams, but other players are also capable of playing unencrypted Windows Media content (Microsoft Silverlight, VLC, MPlayer, etc.). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Windows Media Services)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1
CSVXML


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