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Overview of all keyword tags in articles

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This page provides an overview of 1282 tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of tags and narrow the focus to specific items of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factor Charts

wmv

Windows Media Video (WMV) is a video compression format for several proprietary codecs developed by Microsoft. The original video format, known as WMV, was originally designed for Internet streaming applications, as a competitor to RealVideo. The other formats, such as WMV Screen and WMV Image, cater for specialized content. Through standardization from the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE), WMV 9 has gained adoption for physical-delivery formats such as HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: WMV)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 4

wookie

Apache Wookie is a solution for adding W3C Widgets to web applications incubated at the Apache Software Foundation. Apache Wookie is based on the W3C Widgets specification, and enables widgets to be embedded in web applications using plugins. A number of plugins have been developed for popular web applications such as Wordpress. Apache Wookie also implements the Google Wave Gadget API, enabling synchronous, collaborative Widgets such as games, chats and surveys. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 5

wordnet

WordNet is a lexical database for the English language. It groups English words into sets of synonyms called synsets, provides short, general definitions, and records the various semantic relations between these synonym sets. The purpose is twofold: to produce a combination of dictionary and thesaurus that is more intuitively usable, and to support automatic text analysis and artificial intelligence applications. The database and software tools have been released under a BSD style license and can be downloaded and used freely. The database can also be browsed online. WordNet was created and is being maintained at the Cognitive Science Laboratory of Princeton University under the direction of psychology professor George A. Miller. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Wordnet)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 8

wsdl

The Web Services Description Language is an XML-based language that provides a model for describing Web services. The meaning of the acronym has changed from version 1.1 where the D stood for Definition. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: WSDL)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.6%.
10 46

wsrp

Web Services for Remote Portlets (WSRP) is an OASIS-approved network protocol standard designed for communications with remote portlets. The WSRP specification defines a web service interface for interacting with presentation-oriented web services. Initial work was produced through the joint efforts of the Web Services for Interactive Applications (WSIA) and Web Services for Remote Portlets (WSRP) OASIS Technical Committees. With the approval of WSRP v1 as an OASIS standard in September, 2003, these two technical committees merged and continued the work as the Web Services for Remote Portlets (WSRP) OASIS Technical Committee. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: WSRP)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.7%.
13 64

x.500

X.500 is a series of computer networking standards covering electronic directory services. The X.500 series was developed by ITU-T, formerly known as CCITT, and first approved in 1988. The directory services were developed in order to support the requirements of X.400 electronic mail exchange and name lookup. ISO was a partner in developing the standards, incorporating them into the Open Systems Interconnection suite of protocols. ISO/IEC 9594 is the corresponding ISO identification. The protocols defined by X.500 includeL DAP (Directory Access Protocol); DSP (Directory System Protocol); DISP (Directory Information Shadowing Protocol); DOP (Directory Operational Bindings Management Protocol). Because these X.500 protocols used the OSI networking stack, a number of alternatives to DAP were developed to allow Internet clients to access to the X.500 Directory using the TCP/IP networking stack. The most well-known alternative to DAP is Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP). While DAP and the other X.500 protocols can now use the TCP/IP networking stack, LDAP remains a popular directory access protocol. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: X.500)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 5

xacml

XACML stands for eXtensible Access Control Markup Language. It is a declarative access control policy language implemented in XML and a processing model, describing how to interpret the policies. Latest version 2.0 was ratified by OASIS standards organization on February 1, 2005. The planned version 3.0 will add generic attribute categories for the evaluation context and policy delegation profile (administrative policy profile). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: XACML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 10

xcri

The over-arching goals for the Distributed e-Learning (DeL) programme are to facilitate lifelong learning, enhance learner experience and support the widening participation agenda. These goals are predicated on the availability of accurate and relevant information about opportunities for learners. However, the sheer volume of programmes available and the range of disparate individuals who might usefully require or impart information about them means that HE and FE institutions face significant logistical, cultural and structural challenges in ensuring that programmes as they are advertised match programmes as they are approved and delivered. It is imperative to provide definitive specifications that describe accurately the learning opportunities that will be offered in particular locations at particular times. XCRI will be working with institutions and key partners, such as UCAS, to produce a definitive, standards-based XML description that can be transformed as necessary to satisfy the needs of different audiences. Project start date: 2005-04-01. Project end date: 2006-03-31. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 9

xcri-cap

XCRI-CAP (XCRI Course Advertising Profile) is a very simple web-based technical architecture. Universities, colleges and training providers each offer an XML document describing their courses. Aggregators (such as discovery and guidance services) periodically poll each provider to obtain the latest version of their course catalog using a standard request. The aggregator combines the results to create a catalog to use for searching and for adding features. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 3

xlink

XML Linking Language, or XLink, is an XML markup language and W3C specification that provides methods for creating internal and external links within XML documents, and associating metadata with those links. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Xlink)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.6%.
10 37

xml namespaces

XML namespaces are used for providing uniquely named elements and attributes in an XML document. They are defined in a W3C recommendation. An XML instance may contain element or attribute names from more than one XML vocabulary. If each vocabulary is given a namespace then the ambiguity between identically named elements or attributes can be resolved. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: XML Namespace)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 9

xmpp

Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) is an open-standard communications protocol for message-oriented middleware based on XML (Extensible Markup Language). The protocol was originally named Jabber, and was developed by the Jabber open-source community in 1999 for, originally, near-real-time, extensible instant messaging (IM), presence information, and contact list maintenance. Designed to be extensible, the protocol today also finds application in VoIP and file transfer signaling. Unlike most instant messaging protocols, XMPP uses an open systems approach of development and application, by which anyone may implement an XMPP service and interoperate with other organizations' implementations. The software implementation and many client applications are distributed as free and open source software. XMPP-based software is deployed widely across the Internet and by 2003 was used by over ten million people worldwide, according to the XMPP Standards Foundation. Apache Wave's federation protocol is an extension to the XMPP protocol. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: XMPP)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

xpointer

XPointer is a system for addressing components of XML based internet media. XPointer is divided among four specifications: a "framework" which forms the basis for identifying XML fragments, a positional element addressing scheme, a scheme for namespaces, and a scheme for XPath-based addressing. XPointer Framework is a recommendation since March 2003. The XPointer language is designed to address structural aspects of XML, including text content and other information objects created as a result of parsing the document. Thus, it could be used to point to a section of a document highlighted by a user through a mouse drag action. XPointer is covered by a royalty-free technology patent held by Sun Microsystems. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Xpointer)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 26

xsl

In computing, the term Extensible Stylesheet Language (XSL) is used to refer to a family of languages used to transform and render XML documents. Historically, the XSL Working Group in W3C produced a draft specification under the name XSL, which eventually split into three parts: 1) XSL Transformation (XSLT) is an XML language for transforming XML documents. 2) XSL Formatting Objects (XSL-FO) is an XML language for specifying the visual formatting of an XML document. 3) XML Path Language (XPath) is a non-XML language used by XSLT, and also available for use in non-XSLT contexts, for addressing the parts of an XML document. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: XSL)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.9%.
16 44

xslt

XSLT (Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations) is a declarative, XML-based language used for the transformation of XML documents. The original document is not changed; rather, a new document is created based on the content of an existing one. The new document may be serialized (output) by the processor in standard XML syntax or in another format, such as HTML or plain text. XSLT is most often used to convert data between different XML schemas or to convert XML data into web pages or PDF documents. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: XSLT)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.7%.
30 88

xul

XUL (XML User Interface Language) is an XML user interface markup language developed by the Mozilla project. XUL operates in Mozilla cross-platform applications such as Firefox and Flock. The Mozilla Gecko layout engine provides an implementation of XUL used in the Firefox browser. XUL relies on multiple existing web standards and web technologies, including CSS, JavaScript, and DOM. Such reliance makes XUL relatively easy to learn for people with a background in web-programming and design. XUL has no formal specification and does not inter-operate with non-Gecko implementations. However, it uses an open source implementation of Gecko, tri-licensed under the GPL, LGPL, and MPL. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: XUL)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 3

yahoo pipes

Yahoo! Pipes is a web application from Yahoo! that provides a graphical user interface for building data mashups that aggregate web feeds, web pages, and other services, creating Web-based apps from various sources, and publishing those apps. The application works by enabling users to "pipe" information from different sources and then set up rules for how that content should be modified (for example, filtering). A typical example is New York Times through Flickr, a pipe which takes The New York Times RSS feed and adds a photo from Flickr based on the keywords of each item. Other than the pipe edition page, the website has a documentation page and a discussion page. Documentation page contains information about pipes, a user guide on pipe edition and a troubleshooting guide. The discussion page enables users to discuss the pipes with other users. The site is currently in beta. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Yahoo! Pipes)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 2

z39.50

Z39.50 is a client-server protocol for searching and retrieving information from remote computer databases. It is covered by ANSI/NISO standard Z39.50, and ISO standard 23950. The standard's maintenance agency is the Library of Congress. Z39.50 is widely used in library environments and is often incorporated into integrated library systems and personal bibliographic reference software. Interlibrary catalogue searches for interlibrary loan are often implemented with Z39.50 queries. Work on the Z39.50 protocol began in the 1970s, and led to successive versions in 1988, 1992, 1995 and 2003. The Common Query Language is based on Z39.50 semantics. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Z39.50)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 9%.
157 686

z39.87

ANSI/NISO Z39.87 is a standard which defines a set of metadata elements for raster digital images. The purpose is to help in the development, exchange and interpretation of digital images. The dictionary functions of this standard assist in the interoperability between systems, services, and software. It is also an aid in the long-term management of and continuing access to digital image collections. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Z39.87)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

z39.88

OpenURL is a standardized format (Z39.88) of Uniform Resource Locator (URL) intended to enable Internet users to more easily find a copy of a resource that they are allowed to access. Although OpenURL can be used with any kind of resource on the Internet, it is most heavily used by libraries to help connect patrons to subscription content. The OpenURL standard is designed to enable linking from information resources such as abstracting and indexing databases (sources) to library services (targets), such as academic journals, whether online or in printed or other formats. The linking is mediated by "link resolvers", or "link-servers", which parse the elements of an OpenURL and provide links to appropriate targets available through a library by the use of an OpenURL knowledge base. The source that generates an OpenURL is typically a bibliographic citation or bibliographic record in a database that indexes the information resources often found in libraries, such as articles, books, patents, etc. Examples of such databases include Ovid, Web of Science, SciFinder, Modern Languages Association Bibliography and Google Scholar. A target is a resource or service that helps satisfy a user's information needs. Examples of targets include full-text repositories, online journals, online library catalogs and other Web resources and services. The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has developed OpenURL and its data container (the ContextObject) as American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard Z39.88. On 22 June 2006, the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was named the maintenance agency for the standard. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: OpenUrl)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 11
CSVXML


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