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Overview of all keyword tags in articles

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This page provides an overview of 1283 tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of tags and narrow the focus to specific items of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Termsort icon Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factor Charts

cnri

The Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI), based in Reston, Virginia, is a non-profit organization founded in 1986 by Robert E. Kahn as an "activities center around strategic development of network-based information technologies", including the National Information Infrastructure in the United States. CNRI publishes D-Lib Magazine, a journal of digital library research and development. It also develops the Handle System for managing and locating digital information . CNRI formerly operated the Secretariat of the Internet Engineering Task Force. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: CNRI)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.6%.
11 16

coalition for networked information

The Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) is an organization whose mission is to promote networked information technology as a way to further the advancement of intellectual collaboration and productivity. It is a joint initiative of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) as well as EDUCAUSE. It was started in 1990, and its founding executive director, Paul Evan Peters, served until his death in 1996. Since then it has grown to include over 200 institutions which include both for-profit and non-profit members. It holds semi-annual conferences where its member organizations send representatives to discuss the current trends and activities of the networked information community. Its directors are also frequent contributors to scholarly journals in the information science field. It works on a consultative basis with many of its members: for instance, it is working with the Library of Congress in an effort to map out a National Digital Preservation Program. It also works with international members in countries such as England and Germany. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Coalition for Networked Information)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.9%.
51 68

cocoa

Cocoa is one of Apple Inc.'s native object-oriented application programming interfaces (APIs) for the Mac OS X operating system and - along with the Cocoa Touch extension for gesture recognition and animation - for applications of iOS on Apple's iPhone and iPad product lines. Cocoa applications are typically developed using the development tools provided by Apple, specifically Xcode (formerly Project Builder) and Interface Builder, using the Objective-C language. However, the Cocoa programming environment can be accessed using other tools, such as Clozure CL, LispWorks, Object Pascal, Python, Perl, Ruby, and AppleScript with the aid of bridging mechanisms such as PasCocoa, PyObjC, CamelBones and RubyCocoa. An implementation of the Ruby language, called MacRuby, which does away with the requirement for a bridging mechanism, is under development by Apple, while Nu is a Lisp-like language which can be used with Cocoa without a bridge. It is also possible to write Objective-C Cocoa programs in a simple text editor and build it manually with GCC or clang from the command line or from a makefile. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Cocoa)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

codata

The Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) was established in 1966 as an interdisciplinary committee of the International Council for Science. It seeks to improve the compilation, critical evaluation, storage, and retrieval of data of importance to science and technology. The CODATA Task Group on Fundamental Constants was established in 1969. Its purpose is to periodically provide the international scientific and technological communities with an internationally accepted set of values of the fundamental physical constants and closely related conversion factors for use worldwide. The first such CODATA set was published in 1973, later in 1986, 1998, 2002 and the fifth in 2006. The latest version is Ver.6.0 called "2010CODATA" published on 2011-06-02. The CODATA recommended values of fundamental physical constants are published at the NIST Reference on Constants, Units, and Uncertainty. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: CODATA)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 37

codec

A codec is a device or computer program capable of encoding and/or decoding a digital data stream or signal. The word codec is a portmanteau of 'compressor-decompressor' or, more commonly, 'coder-decoder'. A codec (the program) should not be confused with a coding or compression format or standard - a format is a document (the standard), a way of storing data, while a codec is a program (an implementation) which can read or write such files. In practice "codec" is sometimes used loosely to refer to formats, however. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: codec)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 16

colchester institute

Colchester Institute is a large provider of further and higher education based in the town of Colchester, and includes the Centre for Music and Performing Arts, Centre for Hospitality and Food Studies, and the Professional Training Centre. Education courses are accredited by the University of Essex. On 1st January 2010, Colchester Institute took over Braintree College. Although Colchester Institute owns and manages Braintree College, Braintree continues to operate under its its own name, and has its own website. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Colchester Institute)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 2

collection description

The description of collections is important in the context of network library services and an important underpinning for developing a collective resource. The creation of collection descriptions allows the owners or curators of collections to disclose information about their existence and availability to interested parties. Although collection descriptions may take the form of unstructured textual documents (for example a set of Web pages describing a collection), there are significant advantages in describing collections using structured, open and standardised formats. Such descriptions would enable: users to discover and locate collections of interest; users to perform searches across multiple collections in a controlled way; software to perform such tasks on behalf of users, based on known user preferences. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.9%.
50 215

collection development

Library collection development is the process of meeting the information needs of the people (a service population) in a timely and economical manner using information resources locally held, as well as from other organizations. According to the The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), acquisition and collection development focuses on methodological and topical themes pertaining to acquisition of print and other analogue library materials (by purchase, exchange, gift, legal deposit), and the licensing and purchase of electronic information resources. Collections are developed by librarians and library staff by buying or otherwise acquiring materials over a period, based on assessment of the information needs of the library's users. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Collection development)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.7%.
65 144 710.39

college of new jersey

The College of New Jersey, abbreviated TCNJ, is a public, coeducational university located in Ewing Township, New Jersey, a suburb of Trenton. TCNJ was established in 1855 by an act of the New Jersey Legislature. The institution was the first normal school in the state of New Jersey and the fifth in the United States. Originally located in Trenton proper, the college was moved to its present location in adjacent Ewing Township during the early to mid-1930s. Since its inception, TCNJ has undergone several name changes, the most recent being the 1996 change to its current name, from Trenton State College. Much of TCNJ is built in Georgian colonial architecture style on 289 tree-lined acres. TCNJ is a highly selective institution, with a mission to keep New Jersey's most talented students in-state for higher education. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: College of New Jersey)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 3

common cartridge

The Common Cartridge defines a new package interchange format for learning content, able to run on any compliant LMS platform. Version 1.0 supports the following features: rich content (html, xml, web links, media files); integrated assessments; discussion forums; authorisation for protected content. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

communications protocol

A communications protocol (also known as a network protocol) is a formal description of digital message formats and the rules for exchanging those messages in or between computing systems and in telecommunications. Protocols may include signaling, authentication and error detection and correction capabilities. A protocol describes the syntax, semantics, and synchronization of communication and may be implemented in hardware or software, or both. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Network protocol)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 2

computer programming

Computer programming (often shortened to programming or coding) is the process of designing, writing, testing, debugging / troubleshooting, and maintaining the source code of computer programs. This source code is written in a programming language. The purpose of programming is to create a program that exhibits a certain desired behavior. The process of writing source code often requires expertise in many different subjects, including knowledge of the application domain, specialized algorithms and formal logic. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Computer programming)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 5

content conversion specialists

For over 35 years CCS has been developing integrated software and service solutions for large digitization projects (docWorks) and also uses this knowledge in the field of digital press clipping and digital press review (newsworks). Our customers of docWorks include amongst others the British Library, the Library of Congress, the National Libraries of Norway, Finland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Austria, Australia, Singapore and Denmark as well as the University libraries of Harvard, Stanford and Princeton. Clients of newsWorks are large international companies, public relations and market research agencies as well as most federal German ministries. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 3

content licence

The verb license or grant licence means to give permission. The noun license (American English) or licence (British English) refers to that permission as well as to the document recording that permission. A license may be granted by a party ("licensor") to another party ("licensee") as an element of an agreement between those parties. A shorthand definition of a license is "an authorization (by the licensor) to use the licensed material (by the licensee)." In particular a license may be issued by authorities, to allow an activity that would otherwise be forbidden. It may require paying a fee and/or proving a capability. The requirement may also serve to keep the authorities informed on a type of activity, and to give them the opportunity to set conditions and limitations. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: License)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 3

content management

Content management, or CM, is the set of processes and technologies that support the collection, managing, and publishing of information in any form or medium. In recent times this information is typically referred to as content or, to be precise, digital content. Digital content may take the form of text, such as documents, multimedia files, such as audio or video files, or any other file type which follows a content lifecycle which requires management. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Content management)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 7%.
122 397 0.3

content management interoperability services

Content Management Interoperability Services (CMIS) is a specification for improving interoperability between Enterprise Content Management systems. OASIS approved CMIS as an OASIS Specification on May 1, 2010. CMIS provides a common data model covering typed files, folders with generic properties that can be set or read. In addition there may be an access control system, and a checkout and version control facility, and the ability to define generic relations. There is a set of generic services for modifying and querying the data model, and several protocol bindings for these services, including SOAP and Representational State Transfer (REST), using the Atom convention. The model is based on common architectures of document management systems. Although initiated by AIIM, CMIS is now being administered by the OASIS standards body. Participants in the process include Adobe Systems Incorporated, Alfresco, EMC, eXo, FatWire, HP, IBM, ISIS Papyrus, Liferay, Microsoft, Open Text, Oracle and SAP. The standard is available for public comment at OASIS. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Content Management Interoperability Services)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 3

content negotiation

Content negotiation is a mechanism defined in the HTTP specification that makes it possible to serve different versions of a document (or more generally, a resource) at the same URI, so that user agents can specify which version fit their capabilities the best. One classical use of this mechanism is to serve an image in GIF or PNG format, so that a browser that cannot display PNG images (e.g. MS Internet Explorer 4) will be served the GIF version. To summarize how this works, when a user agent submits a request to a server, the user agent informs the server what media types it understands with ratings of how well it understands them. More precisely, the user agent provides an Accept HTTP header that lists acceptable media types and associated quality factors. The server is then able to supply the version of the resource that best fits the user agent's needs. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Content negotiation)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 20

content packaging

A content package is a file containing content and metadata. A content package is used in e-learning to define some learning content or an assessment that can be delivered, for example by a Learning Management System. It's a standard way of describing learning content that can be read by many programs. The most widely used content packaging format is that defined by IMS Global, which uses an XML manifest file called imsmanifest.xml wrapped up inside a zip file. The learning content itself is either included in the zip file if it is HTML or other media that can run on its own, or else is referenced as a URL from within the manifest. The IMS format was used by SCORM to define their packaging format, and typically every SCORM content object (SCO) is defined by a content package. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Content package)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 4

content provider

A content provider is a network service that makes a collection available. A content provider may disclose metadata about its resources through a structured network service. In the context of the JISC IE, a content provider interacts with brokers, aggregators and portals using Z39.50, the OAI-PMH and RSS/HTTP. Note that 'content provider' may also refer to the organisation that makes collections available - which may be a JISC-funded service, an HE/FE institution, or some other organisation. (Excerpt from JISC Information Environment Glossary)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1%.
17 24

content syndication

Web syndication is a form of syndication in which website material is made available to multiple other sites. Most commonly, web syndication refers to making web feeds available from a site in order to provide other people with a summary or update of the website's recently added content (for example, the latest news or forum posts). The term can also be used to describe other kinds of licensing website content so that other websites can use it. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Content syndication)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 2
CSVXML


by Dr. Radut