Skip to Content

Overview of all keyword tags in articles

Inspecting content image: copyright, used under license from shutterstock.com

This page provides an overview of 1283 tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of tags and narrow the focus to specific items of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articlessort icon Total usage Trending factor Charts

alt

Founded in 1993, Association for Learning Technology (ALT) is registered charity number 1063519, the UK's leading membership organisation in the learning technology field. Its purpose is to ensure that use of learning technology is effective and efficient, informed by research and practice, and grounded in an understanding of the underlying technologies, their capabilities and the situations into which they are placed. Learning technology is the broad range of communication, information and related technologies that can be used to support learning, teaching, and assessment. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.4%.
60 117

london school of economics

The London School of Economics and Political Science (informally the London School of Economics or LSE) is a public research university specialised in the social sciences located in London, United Kingdom, and a constituent college of the federal University of London. Founded in 1895 by Fabian Society members Sidney Webb, Beatrice Webb and George Bernard Shaw, LSE joined the University of London in 1900 and degrees were issued to its students from 1902 onwards. Despite its name LSE conducts teaching and research across the entire range of the social sciences, including accounting and finance, anthropology, economics, geography, history, international relations, law, media and communications, philosophy, politics, psychology, social policy and sociology. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: London School of Economics and Political Science)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.4%.
60 85 4.8

massachusetts institute of technology

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, also known as MIT, is a private research university located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States. MIT has five schools and one college, containing a total of 32 academic departments, with a strong emphasis on scientific and technological education and research. Founded in 1861 in response to the increasing industrialization of the United States, the institute adopted the European polytechnic university model and emphasized laboratory instruction from an early date. MIT's early emphasis on applied technology at the undergraduate and graduate levels led to close cooperation with industry. Curricular reforms under Karl Compton and Vannevar Bush in the 1930s re-emphasized basic scientific research. MIT was elected to the Association of American Universities in 1934. Researchers were involved in efforts to develop computers, radar, and inertial guidance in connection with defense research during World War II and the Cold War. In the past 60 years, MIT's educational disciplines have expanded beyond the physical sciences and engineering into fields such as biology, economics, linguistics, political science, and management. MIT received 17,909 applicants for the class of 2015, with only 1,742 offered admittance, an acceptance rate of 9.7%. It employs around 1,000 faculty members. 77 Nobel laureates, 52 National Medal of Science recipients, 45 Rhodes Scholars, and 38 MacArthur Fellows are currently or have previously been affiliated with the university. MIT has a strong entrepreneurial culture. The aggregated revenues of companies founded by MIT alumni would rank as the eleventh-largest economy in the world. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.4%.
59 102 1

file format

A file format is a particular way that information is encoded for storage in a computer file. Since a disk drive, or indeed any computer storage, can store only bits, the computer must have some way of converting information to 0s and 1s and vice-versa. There are different kinds of formats for different kinds of information. Within any format type, e.g., word processor documents, there will typically be several different formats. Sometimes these formats compete with each other. File formats are divided into proprietary and open formats. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: File format)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.4%.
59 110

youtube

YouTube is a video-sharing website on which users can upload, share, and view videos, created by three former PayPal employees in February 2005. YouTube is a video-sharing website on which users can upload, share, and view videos, created by three former PayPal employees in February 2005. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: YouTube)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.4%.
59 121 3.4

creative commons

Creative Commons (CC) is a non-profit organization headquartered in San Francisco, California, United States devoted to expanding the range of creative works available for others to build upon legally and to share. The organization has released several copyright-licenses known as Creative Commons licenses free of charge to the public. These licenses allow creators to communicate which rights they reserve, and which rights they waive for the benefit of recipients or other creators. An easy to understand one-page explanation of rights, with associated visual symbols, explains the specifics of each Creative Commons license. This simplicity distinguishes Creative Commons from an all-rights reserved copyright. Creative Commons was invented to create a more flexible copyright model, replacing "all rights reserved" with "some rights reserved". Wikipedia is one of the notable web-based projects using one of its licenses. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Creative Commons)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.3%.
58 196 2

nhs

The National Health Service (NHS) is the shared name of three of the four publicly funded healthcare systems in the United Kingdom. The systems are primarily funded through general taxation rather than requiring insurance payments, and were founded in 1948. They provide a comprehensive range of health services, the vast majority of which are free at the point of use to residents of the United Kingdom. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: National Health Service)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.3%.
57 119

sgml

The Standard Generalized Markup Language (ISO 8879:1986 SGML) is an ISO-standard technology for defining generalized markup languages for documents. ISO 8879 Annex A.1 defines generalized markup: Generalized markup is based on two novel postulates: 1) Markup should describe a document's structure and other attributes, rather than specify the processing to be performed on it, as descriptive markup needs to be done only once, and will suffice for future processing. 2) Markup should be rigorous so that the techniques available for processing rigorously-defined objects like programs and databases can be used for processing documents as well. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: SGML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.2%.
56 270

mailbase

Mailbase was the UK's major electronic mailing list service for HE staff. It enables groups of academics, researchers and support staff to communicate and collaborate using Mailbase lists. Groups use Mailbase for: informal discussion; advertising vacant posts; queries and enquiries; co-authoring papers; distributing research material and data; advertising conferences and seminars; locating colleagues with a similar specialist interest; electronic meetings. Mailbase was run by a team based in the Computing Service at the University of Newcastle and is funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) of the Higher Education Funding Councils of England, Scotland and Wales and the Department of Education for Northern Ireland. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.2%.
55 187

application profile

In computer science, an application profile is a set of metadata elements, policies, and guidelines defined for a particular application. The elements may be from one or more element sets, thus allowing a given application to meet its functional requirements by using metadata from several element sets including locally defined sets. For example, a given application might choose a subset of the Dublin Core that meets its needs, or may include elements from the Dublin Core, another element set, and several locally defined elements, all combined in a single schema. An application profile is not complete without documentation that defines the policies and best practices appropriate to the application. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Application profile)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.1%.
54 478

controlled vocabularies

Controlled vocabularies provide a way to organize knowledge for subsequent retrieval. They are used in subject indexing schemes, subject headings, thesauri and taxonomies. Controlled vocabulary schemes mandate the use of predefined, authorised terms that have been preselected by the designer of the vocabulary, in contrast to natural language vocabularies, where there is no restriction on the vocabulary. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Controlled vocabularies)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.1%.
54 121

e-research

The term e-Research (alternately spelled eResearch) refers to the use of information technology to support existing and new forms of research. E-research extends e-Science and cyberinfrastructure to other disciplines, including the humanities and social sciences. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: E-research)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.1%.
54 290 0.3

openurl

OpenURL is a standardized format (Z39.88) of Uniform Resource Locator (URL) intended to enable Internet users to more easily find a copy of a resource that they are allowed to access. Although OpenURL can be used with any kind of resource on the Internet, it is most heavily used by libraries to help connect patrons to subscription content. The OpenURL standard is designed to enable linking from information resources such as abstracting and indexing databases (sources) to library services (targets), such as academic journals, whether online or in printed or other formats. The linking is mediated by "link resolvers", or "link-servers", which parse the elements of an OpenURL and provide links to appropriate targets available through a library by the use of an OpenURL knowledge base. The source that generates an OpenURL is typically a bibliographic citation or bibliographic record in a database that indexes the information resources often found in libraries, such as articles, books, patents, etc. Examples of such databases include Ovid, Web of Science, SciFinder, Modern Languages Association Bibliography and Google Scholar. A target is a resource or service that helps satisfy a user's information needs. Examples of targets include full-text repositories, online journals, online library catalogs and other Web resources and services. The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has developed OpenURL and its data container (the ContextObject) as American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard Z39.88. On 22 June 2006, the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was named the maintenance agency for the standard. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: OpenUrl)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.1%.
54 549

podcast

A podcast (or non-streamed webcast) is a series of digital media files (either audio or video) that are released episodically and often downloaded through web syndication. The word replaced webcast in common vernacular due to the fame of the iPod and its role in the rising popularity and innovation of web feeds. The mode of delivery differentiates podcasting from other means of accessing media files over the Internet, such as direct download, or streamed webcasting. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Podcast)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.1%.
54 146 0.7

cilip

The Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) is a professional body representing librarians and other information professionals in the United Kingdom. It was formed in 2002 by the merger of the Library Association (abbreviated to LA or sometimes LAUK) – founded in 1877 as a result of the first International Conference of Librarians and awarded a Royal Charter in 1898 – and the Institute of Information Scientists, founded in 1958. Membership is not compulsory for practice, but members can work towards Chartered Membership which entitles them to the postnominal letters MCLIP, and subsequently toward Fellowship (FCLIP) [sic]. Affiliated members can also obtain ACLIP upon completing certification. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP))

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3%.
53 173

gopher

The Gopher protocol is a TCP/IP application layer protocol designed for distributing, searching, and retrieving documents over the Internet. Strongly oriented towards a menu-document design, the Gopher protocol was a predecessor of (and later, an alternative to) the World Wide Web. The protocol offers some features not natively supported by the Web and imposes a much stronger hierarchy on information stored on it. Its text menu interface is well-suited to computing environments that rely heavily on remote text-oriented computer terminals, which were still common at the time of its creation in 1991, and the simplicity of its protocol facilitated a wide variety of client implementations. Although largely supplanted by the Web in the years following, the Gopher protocol is still in use by enthusiasts, and a small population of actively-maintained servers remains. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Gopher protocol)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3%.
53 119

de montfort university

De Montfort University (informally De Montfort) is a public research and teaching university situated in the medieval Old Town of Leicester, England, adjacent to the River Soar and the Leicester Castle Gardens. 40% of the University's research was deemed 'world leading' or 'internationally excellent' in the United Kingdom Research Assessment Exercise, highlighting particular strength in English literature, where it equalled the University of Cambridge. The University has the second highest number of National Teaching Fellows of all UK universities. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: De Montfort University)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3%.
52 79

university of birmingham

The University of Birmingham (informally Birmingham University, or simply Birmingham ) is a British Redbrick university located in the city of Birmingham, England. It received its royal charter in 1900 as a successor to Birmingham Medical School (1825) and Mason Science College (1875). Birmingham was the first Redbrick university to gain a charter and thus university status. It is a member of the prestigious Russell Group of research universities and a founding member of Universitas 21. The student population includes around 16,500 undergraduate and 8,000 postgraduate students, making it the largest university in the West Midlands region, and the 11th largest in the UK. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: University of Birmingham)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3%.
52 73 1.4

digital media

Digital media is a form of electronic media where data is stored in digital (as opposed to analog) form. It can refer to the technical aspect of storage and transmission (e.g. hard disk drives or computer networking) of information or to the "end product", such as digital video, augmented reality or digital art. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Digital media)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3%.
52 64

social networks

A social network is a social structure made up of individuals (or organizations) called "nodes", which are tied (connected) by one or more specific types of interdependency, such as friendship, kinship, common interest, financial exchange, dislike, sexual relationships, or relationships of beliefs, knowledge or prestige. Social network analysis views social relationships in terms of network theory consisting of nodes and ties (also called edges, links, or connections). Nodes are the individual actors within the networks, and ties are the relationships between the actors. The resulting graph-based structures are often very complex. There can be many kinds of ties between the nodes. Research in a number of academic fields has shown that social networks operate on many levels, from families up to the level of nations, and play a critical role in determining the way problems are solved, organizations are run, and the degree to which individuals succeed in achieving their goals. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Social network)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3%.
52 103
CSVXML


by Dr. Radut