Emerging terms: 'buzz' tags with highest recency score (RS) over last 52 weeks

This page provides an overview of 617 keyword tags in Ariadne, ordered by recency score.

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Term Description Charts

infrastructure

Infrastructure is basic physical and organizational structures needed for the operation of a society or enterprise, or the services and facilities necessary for an economy to function. It can be generally defined as the set of interconnected structural elements that provide framework supporting an entire structure of development. Telecommunications, computing and monitoring networks are designed by systems engineers. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infrastructure">Wikipedia article: Infrastructure</a>)

infrastructure as a service

Cloud infrastructure services, also known as "infrastructure as a service" (IaaS), deliver computer infrastructure – typically a platform virtualisation environment – as a service, along with raw (block) storage and networking. Rather than purchasing servers, software, data-center space or network equipment, clients instead buy those resources as a fully outsourced service. Suppliers typically bill such services on a utility computing basis; the amount of resources consumed (and therefore the cost) will typically reflect the level of activity. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infrastructure_as_a_Service#Infrastructure"... article: Infrastructure as a service</a>)

infrastructure service

Infrastructure service provides a range of shared structured network services called on by content providers, brokers, aggregators, indexes, catalogues and portals. Infrastructural services include authentication, authorisation, service registry, user preferences, resolver, institutional profile, metadata schema registry and terminology services. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/distributed-systems/jisc-ie/arch/glossary/">JISC Information Environment Glossary</a>)

instant messaging

Instant messaging (IM) is a form of real-time direct text-based communication between two or more people using personal computers or other devices, along with shared clients. The user's text is conveyed over a network, such as the Internet. More advanced instant messaging software clients also allow enhanced modes of communication, such as live voice or video calling. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instant_messaging">Wikipedia article: Instant messaging</a>)

institutional repository

An Institutional Repository is an online locus for collecting, preserving, and disseminating - in digital form - the intellectual output of an institution, particularly a research institution. For a university, this would include materials such as research journal articles, before (preprints) and after (postprints) undergoing peer review, and digital versions of theses and dissertations, but it might also include other digital assets generated by normal academic life, such as administrative documents, course notes, or learning objects. The four main objectives for having an institutional repository are: 1) to provide open access to institutional research output by self-archiving it; 2) to create global visibility for an institution's scholarly research; 3) to collect content in a single location; 4) to store and preserve other institutional digital assets, including unpublished or otherwise easily lost ("grey") literature (e.g., theses or technical reports). (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Institutional_repository">Wikipedia article: Institutional repository</a>)

instructional design

Instructional Design (also called Instructional Systems Design (ISD)) is the practice of maximizing the effectiveness, efficiency and appeal of instruction and other learning experiences. The process consists broadly of determining the current state and needs of the learner, defining the end goal of instruction, and creating some "intervention" to assist in the transition. Ideally the process is informed by pedagogically (process of teaching) and andragogically (adult learning) tested theories of learning and may take place in student-only, teacher-led or community-based settings. The outcome of this instruction may be directly observable and scientifically measured or completely hidden and assumed. There are many instructional design models but many are based on the ADDIE model with the five phases: 1) analysis, 2) design, 3) development, 4) implementation, and 5) evaluation. As a field, instructional design is historically and traditionally rooted in cognitive and behavioral psychology. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instructional_design">Wikipedia article: Instructional design</a>)

intellectual property

Intellectual property (IP) is a term referring to a number of distinct types of creations of the mind for which a set of exclusive rights are recognized - and the corresponding fields of law. Under intellectual property law, owners are granted certain exclusive rights to a variety of intangible assets, such as musical, literary, and artistic works; discoveries and inventions; and words, phrases, symbols, and designs. Common types of intellectual property include copyrights, trademarks, patents, industrial design rights and trade secrets in some jurisdictions. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intellectual_property">Wikipedia article: Intellectual property</a>)

internet explorer

Windows Internet Explorer (formerly Microsoft Internet Explorer, commonly abbreviated IE or MSIE) is a series of graphical web browsers developed by Microsoft and included as part of the Microsoft Windows line of operating systems starting in 1995. It was first released as part of the add-on package Plus! for Windows 95 that year. Later versions were available as free downloads, or in service packs, and included in the OEM service releases of Windows 95 and later versions of Windows. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_explorer">Wikipedia article: Internet Explorer</a>)

interoperability

Interoperability is a property referring to the ability of diverse systems and organizations to work together (inter-operate). The term is often used in a technical systems engineering sense, or alternatively in a broad sense, taking into account social, political, and organizational factors that impact system to system performance.The IEEE Glossary defines interoperability as: the ability of two or more systems or components to exchange information and to use the information that has been exchanged. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interoperability">Wikipedia article: Interoperability</a>)

intranet

An intranet is a computer network that uses Internet Protocol technology to securely share any part of an organization's information or network operating system within that organization. The term is used in contrast to internet, a network between organizations, and instead refers to a network within an organization. Sometimes, the term refers only to the organization's internal website, but may be a more extensive part of the organization's information technology infrastructure. It may host multiple private websites and constitute an important component and focal point of internal communication and collaboration. Any of the well known Internet protocols may be found in an intranet, such as HTTP (web services), SMTP (e-mail), and FTP (file transfer protocol). Internet technologies are often deployed to provide modern interfaces to legacy information systems hosting corporate data. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intranet">Wikipedia article: Intranet</a>)

ipad

The iPad is a line of tablet computers designed, developed and marketed by Apple Inc. primarily as a platform for audio-visual media including books, periodicals, movies, music, games, and web content. Its size and weight falls between those of contemporary smartphones and laptop computers. The iPad runs the same operating system as the iPod Touch and iPhone - and can run its own applications as well as iPhone applications. Without modification, and with the exception of websites, it will only run programs approved by Apple and distributed via its online store. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ipad">Wikipedia article: IPad</a>)

iphone

The iPhone is a line of Internet and multimedia-enabled smartphones designed and marketed by Apple Inc. The first iPhone was unveiled on January 9, 2007, and released on June 29, 2007. Steve Jobs, head of Apple announced iPhone to the world in San Francisco, California at the Moscone Center. An iPhone can function as a video camera, camera phone with text messaging and visual voicemail, a portable media player, and an Internet client with e-mail, web browsing, and both Wi-Fi and 3G connectivity. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iphone">Wikipedia article: IPhone</a>)

irods

Integrated Rule-Oriented Data System (iRODS) is a data grid software system developed by the Data Intensive Cyber Environments research group (developers of the SRB, the Storage Resource Broker), and collaborators. The iRODS system is based on expertise gained through a decade of applying the SRB technology in support of Data Grids, Digital Libraries, Persistent Archives, and Real-time Data Systems. iRODS management policies (sets of assertions these communities make about their digital collections) are characterized in iRODS Rules and state information. At the iRODS core, a Rule Engine interprets the Rules to decide how the system is to respond to various requests and conditions. iRODS is open source under a BSD license. (Excerpt from <a href="https://www.irods.org/index.php/IRODS:Data_Grids,_Digital_Libraries,_Per... source</a>)

isbd

The International Standard Bibliographic Description (ISBD) is a set of rules produced by the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) to describe[clarification needed] a wide range of library materials within the context of a catalog. The consolidated edition of the ISBD was published in 2007. It superseded earlier separate ISBDs that were published for monographs, older monographic publications, cartographic materials, serials and other continuing resources, electronic resources, non-book materials, and printed music. IFLA's ISBD Review Group is responsible for maintaining the ISBD. One of the original purposes of the ISBD was to provide a standard form of bibliographic description that could be used to exchange records internationally. This would support IFLA's program of universal bibliographic control. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Standard_Bibliographic_Descri... article: International Standard Bibliographic Descriptio</a>)

itunes

iTunes is a proprietary digital media player application, used for playing and organizing digital music and video files. The application is also an interface to manage the contents on Apple's iPod, iPhone and iPad. iTunes can connect to the iTunes Store to purchase and download music, music videos, television shows, iPod Games, Audiobooks, Podcasts, movies and movie rentals (not available in all countries), and Ringtones (only available on iPhone and iPod Touch 4th Generation). It is also used to download Apps from the App Store for the iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itunes">Wikipedia article: iTunes</a>)

j2ee

Java Platform, Enterprise Edition or Java EE is a widely used platform for server programming in the Java programming language. The Java platform (Enterprise Edition) differs from the Java Standard Edition Platform (Java SE) in that it adds libraries which provide functionality to deploy fault-tolerant, distributed, multi-tier Java software, based largely on modular components running on an application server. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J2ee">Wikipedia article: Java Platform, Enterprise Edition</a>)

jabber

Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) is an open-standard communications protocol for message-oriented middleware based on XML (Extensible Markup Language). The protocol was originally named Jabber, and was developed by the Jabber open-source community in 1999 for, originally, near-real-time, extensible instant messaging (IM), presence information, and contact list maintenance. Designed to be extensible, the protocol today also finds application in VoIP and file transfer signaling. Unlike most instant messaging protocols, XMPP uses an open systems approach of development and application, by which anyone may implement an XMPP service and interoperate with other organizations' implementations. The software implementation and many client applications are distributed as free and open source software. XMPP-based software is deployed widely across the Internet and by 2003 was used by over ten million people worldwide, according to the XMPP Standards Foundation. Apache Wave's federation protocol is an extension to the XMPP protocol. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extensible_Messaging_and_Presence_Protocol"... article: Jabber</a>)

jacs

The Joint Academic Classification of Subjects (JACS) system is used by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) in the United Kingdom to classify academic subjects, especially for undergraduate degrees. A JACS code for a single subject consists of a letter and three numbers. The letter represents the broad subject classification and subsequent numbers represent further details, similar to the Dewey Decimal System. For example, F represents the Physical Sciences, F300 Physics, F330 Environmental Physics and F331 Atmospheric Physics. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joint_Academic_Classification_of_Subjects">... article: Joint Academic Classification of Subjects (JACS)</a>)

java

Java is a programming language originally developed by James Gosling at Sun Microsystems (which is now a subsidiary of Oracle Corporation) and released in 1995 as a core component of Sun Microsystems' Java platform. The language derives much of its syntax from C and C++ but has a simpler object model and fewer low-level facilities. Java applications are typically compiled to bytecode (class file) that can run on any Java Virtual Machine (JVM) regardless of computer architecture. Java is a general-purpose, concurrent, class-based, object-oriented language that is specifically designed to have as few implementation dependencies as possible. It is intended to let application developers "write once, run anywhere". Java is currently one of the most popular programming languages in use, and is widely used from application software to web applications. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_(programming_language)">Wikipedia article: Java</a>)

javascript

JavaScript, also known as ECMAScript, is a prototype-based, object-oriented scripting language that is dynamic, weakly typed and has first-class functions. It is also considered a functional programming language like Scheme and OCaml because it has closures and supports higher-order functions. JavaScript is an implementation of the ECMAScript language standard and is primarily used in the form of client-side JavaScript, implemented as part of a web browser in order to provide enhanced user interfaces and dynamic websites. This enables programmatic access to computational objects within a host environment. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JavaScript">Wikipedia article: JavaScript</a>)

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