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Emerging terms: 'buzz' tags with highest recency score (RS) over last 52 weeks

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This page provides an overview of 228 keyword tags in Ariadne, ordered by recency score.

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Term Description Recency score (RS) Charts

information society

An information society is a society where the creation, distribution, use, integration and manipulation of information is a significant economic, political, and cultural activity. The aim of the information society is to gain competitive advantage internationally, through using information technology (IT) in a creative and productive way. The knowledge economy is its economic counterpart, whereby wealth is created through the economic exploitation of understanding. People who have the means to partake in this form of society are sometimes called digital citizens. This is one of many dozen labels that have been identified to suggest that humans are entering a new phase of society. The markers of this rapid change may be technological, economic, occupational, spatial, cultural, or some combination of all of these. Information society is seen as the successor to industrial society. Closely related concepts are the post-industrial society (Daniel Bell), post-fordism, post-modern society, knowledge society, telematic society, Information Revolution, liquid modernity, and network society (Manuel Castells). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Information society)

6.6

wordpress

WordPress is an open source blog tool and publishing platform powered by PHP and MySQL. It's often customized into a Content Management System (CMS). It has many features including a plug-in architecture and a template system. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: WordPress)

6.3

blog

A blog (a blend of the term web log) is a type of website or part of a website. Blogs are usually maintained by an individual with regular entries of commentary, descriptions of events, or other material such as graphics or video. Entries are commonly displayed in reverse-chronological order. Blog can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Blog)

6.2

repositories

A repository in publishing, and especially in academic publishing, is a real or virtual facility for the deposit of academic publications, such as academic journal articles. Deposit of material in such a site may be mandatory for a certain group, such as a particular university's doctoral graduates in a thesis repository, or published papers from those holding grants from a particular government agency in a subject repository, or, sometimes, in their own institutional repository. Or it may be voluntary, as usually the case for technical reports at a university. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Repository)

6.2

research

Research can be defined as the search for knowledge, or as any systematic investigation, with an open mind, to establish novel facts, usually using a scientific method. The primary purpose for basic research (as opposed to applied research) is discovering, interpreting, and the development of methods and systems for the advancement of human knowledge on a wide variety of scientific matters of our world and the universe. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Research)

6.1

sushi

The Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol standard (ANSI/NISO Z39.93-2007) defines an automated request and response model for the harvesting of electronic resource usage data utilizing a Web services framework. Built on SOAP, a versioned Web Services Description Language (WSDL), and XML schema with the syntax of the SUSHI protocol, this standard is intended to replace the time-consuming user-mediated collection of usage data reports. SUSHI was designed to be both generalised and extensible, so that it could be used to retrieve a variety of usage reports. An extension designed specifically to work with COUNTER reports is provided with the standard, as these are expected to be the most frequently retrieved usage reports. (Excerpt from this source)

6.1

data

The term data refers to qualitative or quantitative attributes of a variable or set of variables. Data (plural of "datum") are typically the results of measurements and can be the basis of graphs, images, or observations of a set of variables. Data are often viewed as the lowest level of abstraction from which information and then knowledge are derived. Raw data, i.e. unprocessed data, refers to a collection of numbers, characters, images or other outputs from devices that collect information to convert physical quantities into symbols. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Data)

5.8

electronic theses

An Institutional repository is an online locus for collecting, preserving, and disseminating - in digital form - the intellectual output of an institution, particularly a research institution. For a university, this would include materials such as research journal articles, before (preprints) and after (postprints) undergoing peer review, and digital versions of theses and dissertations, but it might also include other digital assets generated by normal academic life, such as administrative documents, course notes, or learning objects. The four main objectives for having an institutional repository are: 1) to provide open access to institutional research output by self-archiving it; 2) to create global visibility for an institution's scholarly research; 3) to collect content in a single location; 4) to store and preserve other institutional digital assets, including unpublished or otherwise easily lost ("grey") literature (e.g., theses or technical reports). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Institutional repository)

5.6

facebook

Facebook (stylized facebook) is a social networking service and website launched in February 2004, operated and privately owned by Facebook, Inc. As of January 2011, Facebook has more than 600 million active users. Users may create a personal profile, add other users as friends, and exchange messages, including automatic notifications when they update their profile. Additionally, users may join common interest user groups, organized by workplace, school or college, or other characteristics. The name of the service stems from the colloquial name for the book given to students at the start of the academic year by university administrations in the United States to help students get to know each other better. Facebook allows anyone who declares themselves to be at least 13 years old to become a registered user of the website. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Facebook)

5.5

standardisation

Standardization is the process of developing and implementing technical standards. The goals of standardization can be to help with independence of single suppliers (commoditization), compatibility, interoperability, safety, repeatability, or quality. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Standardisation)

5.5

web 2.0

The term Web 2.0 is associated with web applications that facilitate participatory information sharing, interoperability, user-centered design, and collaboration on the World Wide Web. A Web 2.0 site allows users to interact and collaborate with each other in a social media dialogue as creators (prosumers) of user-generated content in a virtual community, in contrast to websites where users (consumers) are limited to the passive viewing of content that was created for them. Examples of Web 2.0 include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, video sharing sites, hosted services, web applications, mashups and folksonomies. The term is closely associated with Tim O'Reilly because of the O'Reilly Media Web 2.0 conference in late 2004. Although the term suggests a new version of the World Wide Web, it does not refer to an update to any technical specification, but rather to cumulative changes in the ways software developers and end-users use the Web. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web 2.0)

5.1

web standards

Web standards is a general term for the formal standards and other technical specifications that define and describe aspects of the World Wide Web. In recent years, the term has been more frequently associated with the trend of endorsing a set of standardized best practices for building web sites, and a philosophy of web design and development that includes those methods. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web standards)

5.1

content negotiation

Content negotiation is a mechanism defined in the HTTP specification that makes it possible to serve different versions of a document (or more generally, a resource) at the same URI, so that user agents can specify which version fit their capabilities the best. One classical use of this mechanism is to serve an image in GIF or PNG format, so that a browser that cannot display PNG images (e.g. MS Internet Explorer 4) will be served the GIF version. To summarize how this works, when a user agent submits a request to a server, the user agent informs the server what media types it understands with ratings of how well it understands them. More precisely, the user agent provides an Accept HTTP header that lists acceptable media types and associated quality factors. The server is then able to supply the version of the resource that best fits the user agent's needs. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Content negotiation)

5

institutional repository

An Institutional Repository is an online locus for collecting, preserving, and disseminating - in digital form - the intellectual output of an institution, particularly a research institution. For a university, this would include materials such as research journal articles, before (preprints) and after (postprints) undergoing peer review, and digital versions of theses and dissertations, but it might also include other digital assets generated by normal academic life, such as administrative documents, course notes, or learning objects. The four main objectives for having an institutional repository are: 1) to provide open access to institutional research output by self-archiving it; 2) to create global visibility for an institution's scholarly research; 3) to collect content in a single location; 4) to store and preserve other institutional digital assets, including unpublished or otherwise easily lost ("grey") literature (e.g., theses or technical reports). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Institutional repository)

5

youtube

YouTube is a video-sharing website on which users can upload, share, and view videos, created by three former PayPal employees in February 2005. YouTube is a video-sharing website on which users can upload, share, and view videos, created by three former PayPal employees in February 2005. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: YouTube)

5

mobile learning

The term M-Learning, or "mobile learning", has different meanings for different communities. Although related to e-learning and distance education, it is distinct in its focus on learning across contexts and learning with mobile devices. One definition of mobile learning is: Any sort of learning that happens when the learner is not at a fixed, predetermined location, or learning that happens when the learner takes advantage of the learning opportunities offered by mobile technologies. In other words mobile learning decreases limitation of learning location with the mobility of general portable devices. The term covers: learning with portable technologies including but not limited to handheld computers, MP3 players, notebooks and mobile phones. M-learning focuses on the mobility of the learner, interacting with portable technologies, and learning that reflects a focus on how society and its institutions can accommodate and support an increasingly mobile population. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Mobile learning)

4.5

authentication

Authentication is the act of confirming the truth of an attribute of a datum or entity. This might involve confirming the identity of a person, tracing the origins of an artifact, ensuring that a product is what its packaging and labeling claims to be, or assuring that a computer program is a trusted one. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Authentication)

4.4

dewey decimal

The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC, also called the Dewey Decimal System) is a proprietary system of library classification developed by Melvil Dewey in 1876. It has been greatly modified and expanded through 22 major revisions, the most recent in 2003. This system organizes books on library shelves in a specific and repeatable order that makes it easy to find any book and return it to its proper place. The system is used in 200,000 libraries in at least 135 countries. A designation such as Dewey 16 refers to the 16th edition of the DDC. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Dewey Decimal)

4.3

research information management

Research information refers to administrative information about research projects, researchers, research outputs, funding, and so on. Universities need to manage information about the research they host, in order to inform strategic decisions about that research, to ease reporting to external stakeholders such as funding councils and research funders, and to offer useful services to those within and beyond the institution’s boundaries. There is a lot of work at the moment in this area in the UK, complementing that in other countries. In both the Netherlands and Denmark, for example, universities use a common system to document core information about research (METIS and PURE respectively). Both of these systems are based around the CERIF data model, as are other systems in use such as Converis and the publications-oriented system Symplectic and national systems such as HunCRIS (in Hungary) and SICRIS (in Slovenia). In the UK, JISC, HEFCE, the Research Councils and others are funding a range of work to help the sector better manage information about research, covering institutional infrastructure (joining up institutional systems), national infrastructure (building services and interoperability to share research information), as well as providing guidance, support and opportunities to share experiences and work together. (Excerpt from this source)

4.3

visualisation

Data visualization is the study of the visual representation of data, meaning "information which has been abstracted in some schematic form, including attributes or variables for the units of information". Data visualization is closely related to Information graphics, Information visualization, Scientific visualization and Statistical graphics. In the new millennium data visualization has become active area of research, teaching and development. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Data visualization)

4.2
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