'Buzz' tags used most often over past 52 weeks (RFU)

This page provides an overview of 617 keyword tags in Ariadne, ordered by recent frequent usage.

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zip

The ZIP file format is a data compression and archive format. A ZIP file contains one or more files that have been compressed, to reduce file size, or stored as is. The ZIP file format permits a number of compression algorithms. The format was originally created in 1989 by Phil Katz, and was first implemented in PKWARE's PKZIP utility, as a replacement for the previous ARC compression format by Thom Henderson. The ZIP format is now supported by many software utilities other than PKZIP. Microsoft has included built-in ZIP support (under the name "compressed folders") in versions of its Windows operating system since 1998. Apple has included built-in ZIP support in Mac OS X 10.3 and later, along with other compression formats. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZIP_(file_format)">Wikipedia article: ZIP</a>)

zend framework

Zend Framework (ZF) is an open source, object-oriented web application framework implemented in PHP 5 and licensed under the New BSD License. Code contributions to Zend Framework are subject to rigorous code, documentation, and test standards. All code must meet ZF’s coding standards and unit tests must reach 80% code coverage before the corresponding code may be moved to the release branch. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zend_Framework">Wikipedia article: Zend Framework</a>)

z39.88

OpenURL is a standardized format (Z39.88) of Uniform Resource Locator (URL) intended to enable Internet users to more easily find a copy of a resource that they are allowed to access. Although OpenURL can be used with any kind of resource on the Internet, it is most heavily used by libraries to help connect patrons to subscription content. The OpenURL standard is designed to enable linking from information resources such as abstracting and indexing databases (sources) to library services (targets), such as academic journals, whether online or in printed or other formats. The linking is mediated by "link resolvers", or "link-servers", which parse the elements of an OpenURL and provide links to appropriate targets available through a library by the use of an OpenURL knowledge base. The source that generates an OpenURL is typically a bibliographic citation or bibliographic record in a database that indexes the information resources often found in libraries, such as articles, books, patents, etc. Examples of such databases include Ovid, Web of Science, SciFinder, Modern Languages Association Bibliography and Google Scholar. A target is a resource or service that helps satisfy a user's information needs. Examples of targets include full-text repositories, online journals, online library catalogs and other Web resources and services. The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has developed OpenURL and its data container (the ContextObject) as American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard Z39.88. On 22 June 2006, the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was named the maintenance agency for the standard. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenURL">Wikipedia article: OpenUrl</a>)

z39.87

ANSI/NISO Z39.87 is a standard which defines a set of metadata elements for raster digital images. The purpose is to help in the development, exchange and interpretation of digital images. The dictionary functions of this standard assist in the interoperability between systems, services, and software. It is also an aid in the long-term management of and continuing access to digital image collections. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z39.87">Wikipedia article: Z39.87</a>)

z39.50

Z39.50 is a client-server protocol for searching and retrieving information from remote computer databases. It is covered by ANSI/NISO standard Z39.50, and ISO standard 23950. The standard's maintenance agency is the Library of Congress. Z39.50 is widely used in library environments and is often incorporated into integrated library systems and personal bibliographic reference software. Interlibrary catalogue searches for interlibrary loan are often implemented with Z39.50 queries. Work on the Z39.50 protocol began in the 1970s, and led to successive versions in 1988, 1992, 1995 and 2003. The Common Query Language is based on Z39.50 semantics. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Z39.50">Wikipedia article: Z39.50</a>)

youtube

YouTube is a video-sharing website on which users can upload, share, and view videos, created by three former PayPal employees in February 2005. YouTube is a video-sharing website on which users can upload, share, and view videos, created by three former PayPal employees in February 2005. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Youtube">Wikipedia article: YouTube</a>)

yahoo pipes

Yahoo! Pipes is a web application from Yahoo! that provides a graphical user interface for building data mashups that aggregate web feeds, web pages, and other services, creating Web-based apps from various sources, and publishing those apps. The application works by enabling users to "pipe" information from different sources and then set up rules for how that content should be modified (for example, filtering). A typical example is New York Times through Flickr, a pipe which takes The New York Times RSS feed and adds a photo from Flickr based on the keywords of each item. Other than the pipe edition page, the website has a documentation page and a discussion page. Documentation page contains information about pipes, a user guide on pipe edition and a troubleshooting guide. The discussion page enables users to discuss the pipes with other users. The site is currently in beta. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yahoo!_Pipes">Wikipedia article: Yahoo! Pipes</a>)

xul

XUL (XML User Interface Language) is an XML user interface markup language developed by the Mozilla project. XUL operates in Mozilla cross-platform applications such as Firefox and Flock. The Mozilla Gecko layout engine provides an implementation of XUL used in the Firefox browser. XUL relies on multiple existing web standards and web technologies, including CSS, JavaScript, and DOM. Such reliance makes XUL relatively easy to learn for people with a background in web-programming and design. XUL has no formal specification and does not inter-operate with non-Gecko implementations. However, it uses an open source implementation of Gecko, tri-licensed under the GPL, LGPL, and MPL. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XUL">Wikipedia article: XUL</a>)

xslt

XSLT (Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations) is a declarative, XML-based language used for the transformation of XML documents. The original document is not changed; rather, a new document is created based on the content of an existing one. The new document may be serialized (output) by the processor in standard XML syntax or in another format, such as HTML or plain text. XSLT is most often used to convert data between different XML schemas or to convert XML data into web pages or PDF documents. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xslt">Wikipedia article: XSLT</a>)

xsl

In computing, the term Extensible Stylesheet Language (XSL) is used to refer to a family of languages used to transform and render XML documents. Historically, the XSL Working Group in W3C produced a draft specification under the name XSL, which eventually split into three parts: 1) XSL Transformation (XSLT) is an XML language for transforming XML documents. 2) XSL Formatting Objects (XSL-FO) is an XML language for specifying the visual formatting of an XML document. 3) XML Path Language (XPath) is a non-XML language used by XSLT, and also available for use in non-XSLT contexts, for addressing the parts of an XML document. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extensible_Stylesheet_Language">Wikipedia article: XSL</a>)

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