'Buzz' tags used most often over past 52 weeks (RFU)

This page provides an overview of 617 keyword tags in Ariadne, ordered by recent frequent usage.

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Term Description Charts

authentication service

An authentication service is a structured network service that determines that the digital ID being presented to a network service is being used by the real-world individual who has the rights to use it. This is often achieved through the use of a username/password combination or a digital certificate, depending on the degree of assurance required. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/distributed-systems/jisc-ie/arch/glossary/">JISC Information Environment Glossary</a>)

authorisation service

An authorisation service is a structured network service that indicates whether a particular digital ID has the necessary access-rights to access a particular resource. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/distributed-systems/jisc-ie/arch/glossary/">JISC Information Environment Glossary</a>)

authority data

Functional Requirements for Authority Data (FRAD), formerly known as Functional Requirements for Authority Records (FRAR) is a conceptual entity-relationship model developed by the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) for relating the data that are recorded in library authority records to the needs of the users of those records and facilitate and sharing of that data. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Functional_Requirements_for_Authority_Data"... article: FRAD</a>)

avatar

In computing, an avatar is the graphical representation of the user or the user's alter ego or character. It may take either a three-dimensional form, as in games or virtual worlds, or a two-dimensional form as an icon in Internet forums and other online communities. It can also refer to a text construct found on early systems such as MUDs. It is an object representing the user. The term "avatar" can also refer to the personality connected with the screen name, or handle, of an Internet user. For other meanings of this term, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avatar_(disambiguation) . (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avatar_(computing)">Wikipedia article: Avatar</a>)

avi

Audio Video Interleave (also Audio Video Interleaved), known by its acronym AVI, is a multimedia container format introduced by Microsoft in November 1992 as part of its Video for Windows technology. AVI files can contain both audio and video data in a file container that allows synchronous audio-with-video playback. Like the DVD video format, AVI files support multiple streaming audio and video, although these features are seldom used. Most AVI files also use the file format extensions developed by the Matrox OpenDML group in February 1996. These files are supported by Microsoft, and are unofficially called "AVI 2.0". (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_Video_Interleave">Wikipedia article: AVI</a>)

bath profile

The Bath Profile is an international Z39.50 Specification for Library Applications and Resource Discovery The syntax of Z39.50 is abstracted from the underlying database structure; for example, if the client specifies an author search (Use attribute 1003), it is up to the server to determine how to map that search to the indexes it has at hand. This allows Z39.50 queries to be formulated without having to know anything about the target database; but it also means that results for the same query can vary widely among different servers. One server may have an author index; another may use its index of personal names, whether they are authors or not; another may have no suitable index and fall back on its keyword index; and another may have no suitable index and return an error. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bath_Profile">Wikipedia article: Bath Profile</a>)

bibliographic control

In library and information science, bibliographic control (also known as information organization or bibliographic organization) is the process by which information resources are described so that users are able to find and select that information resource. An information resource could be a book, a movie, or an image, among other things. By providing a name, title, and subject access to the description, a bibliographic record is created. This bibliographic record, which is essentially metadata, is indexed by an information retrieval tool (such as a database or a search engine) so that a user can find out whether or not the information resource is relevant to them. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibliographic_control">Wikipedia article: Bibliographic control</a>)

bibliographic data

A bibliographic database is a database of bibliographic records, an organized digital collection of references to published literature, including journal and newspaper articles, conference proceedings, reports, government and legal publications, patents, books, etc. In contrast to library catalogue entries, a large proportion of the bibliographic records in bibliographic databases describe analytics (articles, conference papers, etc.) rather than complete monographs, and they generally contain very rich subject descriptions in the form of keywords, subject classification terms, or abstracts. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibliographic_database">Wikipedia article: Bibliographic data</a>)

bibliographic database

A bibliographic database is a database of bibliographic records, an organized digital collection of references to published literature, including journal and newspaper articles, conference proceedings, reports, government and legal publications, patents, books, etc. In contrast to library catalogue entries, a large proportion of the bibliographic records in bibliographic databases describe analytics (articles, conference papers, etc.) rather than complete monographs, and they generally contain very rich subject descriptions in the form of keywords, subject classification terms, or abstracts. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibliographic_database">Wikipedia article: Bibliographic database</a>)

bibliographic record

A bibliographic record is an entry being a uniform representation and description of a specific content item in a bibliographic database (or a library catalog), containing data elements required for its identification and retrieval, as well as additional supporting information, presented in a formalized bibliographic format. The additional information may support particular database functions such as search, or browse (e.g. keywords), or may serve fuller presentation of the content item in the database (e.g. article's abstract). Bibliographic records are usually retrievable from bibliographic databases by author, title, index term, or keyword. Bibliographic records can represent a wide variety of published contents, including traditional paper, digitized or born-digital publications. The process of creation, exchange, and preservation of bibliographic records are parts of a larger process, called bibliographic control. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibliographic_record">Wikipedia article: Bibliographic record</a>)

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