'Buzz' tags used most often over past 52 weeks (RFU)

This page provides an overview of 617 keyword tags in Ariadne, ordered by recent frequent usage.

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Term Description Charts

diigo

Diigo is a social bookmarking website which allows signed-up users to bookmark and tag web-pages. Additionally, it allows users to highlight any part of a webpage and attach sticky notes to specific highlights or to a whole page. These annotations can be kept private, shared with a group within Diigo or a special link forwarded to someone else. The name "Diigo" is an acronym from "Digest of Internet Information, Groups and Other stuff". (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diigo">Wikipedia article: Diigo</a>)

dirac

Dirac is an open and royalty-free video compression format, specification and system developed by BBC Research at the BBC. Schrödinger and dirac-research (formerly just called 'Dirac') are open and royalty-free software implementations (video codecs) of Dirac. Dirac format aims to provide high-quality video compression for Ultra HDTV and beyond, and as such competes with existing formats such as H.264 and VC-1. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dirac_(codec)">Wikipedia article: Dirac</a>)

disruptive innovation

A disruptive innovation is an innovation that disrupts an existing market. The term is used in business and technology literature to describe innovations that improve a product or service in ways that the market does not expect, typically by lowering price or designing for a different set of consumers. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disruptive_innovation">Wikipedia article: Disruptive innovation</a>)

dissemination

To disseminate, in terms of the field of communication, means to broadcast a message to the public without direct feedback from the audience. Dissemination takes on the theory of the traditional view of communication, which involves a sender and receiver. The traditional communication view point is broken down into a sender sending information, and receiver collecting the information processing it and sending information back, like a telephone line. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissemination">Wikipedia article: Dissemination</a>)

dns

The Domain Name System (DNS) is a hierarchical naming system built on a distributed database for computers, services, or any resource connected to the Internet or a private network. Most importantly, it translates domain names meaningful to humans into the numerical identifiers associated with networking equipment for the purpose of locating and addressing these devices worldwide. An often-used analogy to explain the Domain Name System is that it serves as the phone book for the Internet by translating human-friendly computer hostnames into IP addresses. For example, the domain name www.example.com translates to the addresses 192.0.32.10 (IPv4) and 2620:0:2d0:200::10 (IPv6). (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_Name_System">Wikipedia article: DNS</a>)

doc

In computing, DOC or doc (an abbreviation of 'document') is a file extension for word processing documents; most commonly for Microsoft Word. Historically, the extension was used for documentation in plain-text format, particularly of programs or computer hardware, on a wide range of operating systems. During the 1980s, WordPerfect used DOC as the extension of their proprietary format. Later, in the 1990s, Microsoft chose to use the DOC extension for their proprietary Microsoft Word word processing formats. The original uses for the extension have largely disappeared from the PC world. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DOC_(computing)">Wikipedia article: DOC</a>)

document format

A document file format is a text or binary file format for storing documents on a storage media, especially for use by computers. There currently exist a multitude of incompatible document file formats. A rough consensus has been established that XML is to be the basis for future document file formats. Examples of XML-based open standards are DocBook, XHTML, and, more recently, the ISO/IEC standards OpenDocument (ISO 26300:2006) and Office Open XML (ISO 29500:2008). (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Document_file_format">Wikipedia article: Document format</a>)

document management

A document management system (DMS) is a computer system (or set of computer programs) used to track and store electronic documents and/or images of paper documents. It is usually also capable of keeping track of the different versions created by different users (history tracking). The term has some overlap with the concepts of content management systems. It is often viewed as a component of enterprise content management (ECM) systems and related to digital asset management, document imaging, workflow systems and records management systems. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Document_management">Wikipedia article: Document management system</a>)

doi

A digital object identifier (DOI) is a character string used to uniquely identify an electronic document or other object. Metadata about the object is stored in association with the DOI name and this metadata may include a location, such as a URL, where the object can be found. The DOI for a document is permanent, whereas its location and other metadata may change. Referring to an online document by its DOI provides more stable linking than simply referring to it by its URL, because if its URL changes, the publisher need only update the metadata for the DOI to link to the new URL. However, unlike URLs, the DOI system is not open to all comers; only organizations that can meet the contractual obligations of the DOI system and that are willing to pay to become a member of the system can assign DOIs. The DOI system is implemented through a federation of registration agencies coordinated by the International DOI Foundation, which developed and controls the system. The DOI system has been developed and implemented in a range of publishing applications since 2000; by late 2009 approximately 43 million DOI names had been assigned by some 4,000 organizations. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_object_identifier">Wikipedia article: DOI</a>)

dom

Document Object Model (DOM) is a cross-platform and language-independent convention for representing and interacting with objects in HTML, XHTML and XML documents. Aspects of the DOM (such as its "Elements") may be addressed and manipulated within the syntax of the programming language in use. The public interface of a DOM is specified in its application programming interface (API). (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Document_Object_Model">Wikipedia article: DOM</a>)

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