'Buzz' tags used most often over past 52 weeks (RFU)

This page provides an overview of 617 keyword tags in Ariadne, ordered by recent frequent usage.

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bpmn

Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) is a graphical representation for specifying business processes in a business process model. BPMN was developed by Business Process Management Initiative (BPMI), and is currently maintained by the Object Management Group since the two organizations merged in 2005. As of March 2011, the current version of BPMN is 2.0. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_Process_Modeling_Notation">Wikipedia article: Business Process Modeling Notation</a>)

broker

A broker is a structured network service that provides (search) access to a range of other, heterogeneous, local or remote structured network services. Brokers are intended for use by software applications. In the context of the JISC IE, brokers interact with indexes, catalogues, aggregators, content providers, other brokers and portals using Z39.50. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/distributed-systems/jisc-ie/arch/glossary/">JISC Information Environment Glossary</a>)

browser

A web browser or Internet browser is a software application for retrieving, presenting, and traversing information resources on the World Wide Web. An information resource is identified by a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) and may be a web page, image, video, or other piece of content. Hyperlinks present in resources enable users to easily navigate their browsers to related resources. Although browsers are primarily intended to access the World Wide Web, they can also be used to access information provided by Web servers in private networks or files in file systems. Some browsers can also be used to save information resources to file systems. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_browser">Wikipedia article: web browser</a>)

bs8878

Web accessibility refers to the inclusive practice of making websites usable by people of all abilities and disabilities. When sites are correctly designed, developed and edited, all users can have equal access to information and functionality. For example, when a site is coded with semantically meaningful HTML, with textual equivalents provided for images and with links named meaningfully, this helps blind users using text-to-speech software and/or text-to-Braille hardware. When text and images are large and/or enlargable, it is easier for users with poor sight to read and understand the content. When links are underlined (or otherwise differentiated) as well as coloured, this ensures that color blind users will be able to notice them. When clickable links and areas are large, this helps users who cannot control a mouse with precision. When pages are coded so that users can navigate by means of the keyboard alone, or a single switch access device alone, this helps users who cannot use a mouse or even a standard keyboard. When videos are closed captioned or a sign language version is available, deaf and hard of hearing users can understand the video. When flashing effects are avoided or made optional, users prone to seizures caused by these effects are not put at risk. And when content is written in plain language and illustrated with instructional diagrams and animations, users with dyslexia and learning difficulties are better able to understand the content. When sites are correctly built and maintained, all of these users can be accommodated while not impacting on the usability of the site for non-disabled users. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_accessibility">Wikipedia article: BS 8878</a>)

bsd

Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD, sometimes called Berkeley Unix) is a UNIX operating system derivative developed and distributed by the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California, Berkeley, from 1977 to 1995. Historically, BSD has been considered a branch of UNIX - "BSD UNIX", because it shared the initial codebase and design with the original AT&T UNIX operating system. In the 1980s, BSD was widely adopted by vendors of workstation-class systems in the form of proprietary UNIX variants such as DEC ULTRIX and Sun Microsystems SunOS. This can be attributed to the ease with which it could be licensed, and the familiarity it found among the founders of many technology companies of this era. Though these proprietary BSD derivatives were largely superseded by the UNIX System V Release 4 and OSF/1 systems in the 1990s (both of which incorporated BSD code), later BSD releases provided a basis for several open source development projects that continue to this day. Today, the term "BSD" is often non-specifically used to refer to any of these BSD descendants, e.g., FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD or DragonFly, which together form a branch of the family of Unix-like operating systems. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_Software_Distribution">Wikipedia article: BSD</a>)

bsd licence

BSD licenses are a family of permissive free software licenses. The original license was used for the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD), a Unix-like operating system after which it is named. The original owners of BSD were the Regents of the University of California because BSD was first written at the University of California, Berkeley. The first version of the license was revised, and the resulting licenses are more properly called modified BSD licenses. Two variants of the license, the New BSD License/Modified BSD License, and the Simplified BSD License/FreeBSD License have been verified as GPL-compatible free software licenses by the Free Software Foundation, and have been vetted as open source licenses by the Open Source Initiative, while the original, 4-clause license has not been accepted as an open source license and, although the original is considered to be a free software license by the FSF, the FSF does not consider it to be compatible with the GPL due to the advertising clause. The licenses have fewer restrictions on distribution compared to other free software licenses such as the GNU General Public License or even the default restrictions provided by copyright, putting works licensed under them relatively closer to the public domain. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BSD_licenses">Wikipedia article: BSD license</a>)

business process modelling

Business Process Modeling (BPM) in systems engineering and hardware engineering is the activity of representing processes of an enterprise, so that the current process may be analyzed and improved. BPM is typically performed by business analysts and managers who are seeking to improve process efficiency and quality. The process improvements identified by BPM may or may not require Information Technology involvement, although that is a common driver for the need to model a business process, by creating a process master. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_process_modelling">Wikipedia article: Business process modelling</a>)

c programming

C is a general-purpose computer programming language developed between 1969 and 1973 by Dennis Ritchie at the Bell Telephone Laboratories for use with the Unix operating system. Although C was designed for implementing system software, it is also widely used for developing portable application software. C is one of the most popular programming languages of all time and there are very few computer architectures for which a C compiler does not exist. C has greatly influenced many other popular programming languages, most notably C++, which began as an extension to C. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_(Programming_Language)">Wikipedia article: C programming language</a>)

cache

In computer engineering, a cache is a component that transparently stores data so that future requests for that data can be served faster. The data that is stored within a cache might be values that have been computed earlier or duplicates of original values that are stored elsewhere. If requested data is contained in the cache (cache hit), this request can be served by simply reading the cache, which is comparatively faster. Otherwise (cache miss), the data has to be recomputed or fetched from its original storage location, which is comparatively slower. Hence, the more requests can be served from the cache the faster the overall system performance is. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cache">Wikipedia article: Cache</a>)

catalogue index

A catalogue index is a network service that provides access to a machine-generated database of information derived from the content of items in a collection. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/distributed-systems/jisc-ie/arch/glossary/">JISC Information Environment Glossary</a>)

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