'Buzz' tags used most often over past 52 weeks (RFU)

This page provides an overview of 617 keyword tags in Ariadne, ordered by recent frequent usage.

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Term Description Charts

collection description

The description of collections is important in the context of network library services and an important underpinning for developing a collective resource. The creation of collection descriptions allows the owners or curators of collections to disclose information about their existence and availability to interested parties. Although collection descriptions may take the form of unstructured textual documents (for example a set of Web pages describing a collection), there are significant advantages in describing collections using structured, open and standardised formats. Such descriptions would enable: users to discover and locate collections of interest; users to perform searches across multiple collections in a controlled way; software to perform such tasks on behalf of users, based on known user preferences. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/metadata/rslp/proposal/">this source</a>)

collection development

Library collection development is the process of meeting the information needs of the people (a service population) in a timely and economical manner using information resources locally held, as well as from other organizations. According to the The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), acquisition and collection development focuses on methodological and topical themes pertaining to acquisition of print and other analogue library materials (by purchase, exchange, gift, legal deposit), and the licensing and purchase of electronic information resources. Collections are developed by librarians and library staff by buying or otherwise acquiring materials over a period, based on assessment of the information needs of the library's users. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collection_development">Wikipedia article: Collection development</a>)

common cartridge

The Common Cartridge defines a new package interchange format for learning content, able to run on any compliant LMS platform. Version 1.0 supports the following features: rich content (html, xml, web links, media files); integrated assessments; discussion forums; authorisation for protected content. (Excerpt from <a href="http://www.imsglobal.org/commoncartridge.html">this source</a>)

communications protocol

A communications protocol (also known as a network protocol) is a formal description of digital message formats and the rules for exchanging those messages in or between computing systems and in telecommunications. Protocols may include signaling, authentication and error detection and correction capabilities. A protocol describes the syntax, semantics, and synchronization of communication and may be implemented in hardware or software, or both. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communications_protocol">Wikipedia article: Network protocol</a>)

computer programming

Computer programming (often shortened to programming or coding) is the process of designing, writing, testing, debugging / troubleshooting, and maintaining the source code of computer programs. This source code is written in a programming language. The purpose of programming is to create a program that exhibits a certain desired behavior. The process of writing source code often requires expertise in many different subjects, including knowledge of the application domain, specialized algorithms and formal logic. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_programming">Wikipedia article: Computer programming</a>)

content licence

The verb license or grant licence means to give permission. The noun license (American English) or licence (British English) refers to that permission as well as to the document recording that permission. A license may be granted by a party ("licensor") to another party ("licensee") as an element of an agreement between those parties. A shorthand definition of a license is "an authorization (by the licensor) to use the licensed material (by the licensee)." In particular a license may be issued by authorities, to allow an activity that would otherwise be forbidden. It may require paying a fee and/or proving a capability. The requirement may also serve to keep the authorities informed on a type of activity, and to give them the opportunity to set conditions and limitations. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/License">Wikipedia article: License</a>)

content management

Content management, or CM, is the set of processes and technologies that support the collection, managing, and publishing of information in any form or medium. In recent times this information is typically referred to as content or, to be precise, digital content. Digital content may take the form of text, such as documents, multimedia files, such as audio or video files, or any other file type which follows a content lifecycle which requires management. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_management">Wikipedia article: Content management</a>)

content management interoperability services

Content Management Interoperability Services (CMIS) is a specification for improving interoperability between Enterprise Content Management systems. OASIS approved CMIS as an OASIS Specification on May 1, 2010. CMIS provides a common data model covering typed files, folders with generic properties that can be set or read. In addition there may be an access control system, and a checkout and version control facility, and the ability to define generic relations. There is a set of generic services for modifying and querying the data model, and several protocol bindings for these services, including SOAP and Representational State Transfer (REST), using the Atom convention. The model is based on common architectures of document management systems. Although initiated by AIIM, CMIS is now being administered by the OASIS standards body. Participants in the process include Adobe Systems Incorporated, Alfresco, EMC, eXo, FatWire, HP, IBM, ISIS Papyrus, Liferay, Microsoft, Open Text, Oracle and SAP. The standard is available for public comment at OASIS. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_Management_Interoperability_Service... article: Content Management Interoperability Services</a>)

content negotiation

Content negotiation is a mechanism defined in the HTTP specification that makes it possible to serve different versions of a document (or more generally, a resource) at the same URI, so that user agents can specify which version fit their capabilities the best. One classical use of this mechanism is to serve an image in GIF or PNG format, so that a browser that cannot display PNG images (e.g. MS Internet Explorer 4) will be served the GIF version. To summarize how this works, when a user agent submits a request to a server, the user agent informs the server what media types it understands with ratings of how well it understands them. More precisely, the user agent provides an Accept HTTP header that lists acceptable media types and associated quality factors. The server is then able to supply the version of the resource that best fits the user agent's needs. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_negotiation">Wikipedia article: Content negotiation</a>)

content packaging

A content package is a file containing content and metadata. A content package is used in e-learning to define some learning content or an assessment that can be delivered, for example by a Learning Management System. It's a standard way of describing learning content that can be read by many programs. The most widely used content packaging format is that defined by IMS Global, which uses an XML manifest file called imsmanifest.xml wrapped up inside a zip file. The learning content itself is either included in the zip file if it is HTML or other media that can run on its own, or else is referenced as a URL from within the manifest. The IMS format was used by SCORM to define their packaging format, and typically every SCORM content object (SCO) is defined by a content package. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_package">Wikipedia article: Content package</a>)

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