Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 617 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Termsort descending Brief description Charts

domain model

A domain model in problem solving and software engineering can be thought of as a conceptual model of a domain of interest (often referred to as a problem domain) which describes the various entities, their attributes and relationships, plus the constraints that govern the integrity of the model elements comprising that problem domain. The domain model is created in order to represent the vocabulary and key concepts of the problem domain. The domain model also identifies the relationships among all the entities within the scope of the problem domain, and commonly identifies their attributes. A domain model that encapsulates methods within the entities is more properly associated with object oriented models. The domain model provides a structural view of the domain that can be complemented by other dynamic views, such as Use Case models. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_model">Wikipedia article: Domain model</a>)

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drm

Digital rights management (DRM) is a term for access control technologies that are used by hardware manufacturers, publishers, copyright holders and individuals to limit the use of digital content and devices. The term is used to describe any technology that inhibits uses of digital content that is not desired or intended by the content provider. The term does not generally refer to other forms of copy protection, which can be circumvented without modifying the file or device, such as serial numbers or keyfiles. It can also refer to restrictions associated with specific instances of digital works or devices. Digital rights management is used by companies such as Sony, Amazon, Apple Inc., Microsoft, AOL and the BBC. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_rights_management">Wikipedia article: Digital rights management</a>)

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droid

DROID (Digital Record Object Identification) is an automatic file format identification tool. It is the first in a planned series of tools developed by The National Archives under the umbrella of its PRONOM technical registry service. (Excerpt from <a href="http://droid.sourceforge.net/">this source</a>)

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drupal

Drupal is a free and open source content management system (CMS) and Content Management framework (CMF) written in PHP and distributed under the GNU General Public License. It is used as a back-end system for at least 1.5% of all websites worldwide ranging from personal blogs to corporate, political, and government sites including whitehouse.gov and data.gov.uk. It is also used for knowledge management and business collaboration. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drupal">Wikipedia article: Drupal</a>)

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dspace

DSpace is an open source software package that provides the tools for management of digital assets, and is commonly used as the basis for an institutional repository. It supports a wide variety of data, including books, theses, 3D digital scans of objects, photographs, film, video, research data sets and other forms of content. The data is arranged as community collections of items, which bundle bitstreams together. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DSpace">Wikipedia article: Dspace</a>)

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dtd

Document Type Definition (DTD) is a set of markup declarations that define a document type for SGML-family markup languages (SGML, XML, HTML). DTDs were a precursor to XML schema and have a similar function, although different capabilities. DTDs use a terse formal syntax that declares precisely which elements and references may appear where in the document of the particular type, and what the elements' contents and attributes are. DTDs also declare entities which may be used in the instance document. XML uses a subset of SGML DTD. As of 2009 newer XML Namespace-aware schema languages (such as W3C XML Schema and ISO RELAX NG) have largely superseded DTDs. A namespace-aware version of DTDs is being developed as Part 9 of ISO DSDL. DTDs persist in applications which need special publishing characters such as the XML and HTML Character Entity References, which were derived from the larger sets defined as part of the ISO SGML standard effort. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Document_Type_Definition">Wikipedia article: DTD</a>)

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dublin core

The Dublin Core set of metadata elements provides a small and fundamental group of text elements through which most resources can be described and catalogued. Using only 15 base text fields, a Dublin Core metadata record can describe physical resources such as books, digital materials such as video, sound, image, or text files, and composite media like web pages. Metadata records based on Dublin Core are intended to be used for cross-domain information resource description and have become standard in the fields of library science and computer science. Implementations of Dublin Core typically make use of XML and are Resource Description Framework based. Dublin Core is defined by ISO through ISO Standard 15836, and NISO Standard Z39.85-2007. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dublin_core">Wikipedia article: Dublin Core</a>)

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dublin core metadata initiative

The Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI) incorporated as an independent entity (separating from OCLC) in 2008 that provides an open forum for the development of interoperable online metadata standards for a broad range of purposes and of business models. DCMI's activities include consensus-driven working groups, global conferences and workshops, standards liaison, and educational efforts to promote widespread acceptance of metadata standards and practices. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DCMI">Wikipedia article: Dublin Core Metadata Initiative</a>)

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dvd

DVD is an optical disc storage media format, invented and developed by Philips, Sony, Toshiba, and Panasonic in 1995. DVDs offer higher storage capacity than Compact Discs while having the same dimensions. Pre-recorded DVDs are mass-produced using molding machines that physically stamp data onto the DVD. Such discs are known as DVD-ROM, because data can only be read and not written nor erased. Blank recordable DVDs (DVD-R and DVD+R) can be recorded once using optical disc recording technologies and supported by optical disc drives and DVD recorders and then function as a DVD-ROM. Rewritable DVDs (DVD-RW, DVD+RW, and DVD-RAM) can be recorded and erased multiple times. DVDs are used in DVD-Video consumer digital video format and in DVD-Audio consumer digital audio format, as well as for authoring AVCHD discs. DVDs containing other types of information may be referred to as DVD data discs. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD">Wikipedia article: DVD</a>)

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dyslexia action

e-business

Electronic business, commonly referred to as "eBusiness" or "e-business", or an internet business, may be defined as the application of information and communication technologies (ICT) in support of all the activities of business. Commerce constitutes the exchange of products and services between businesses, groups and individuals and can be seen as one of the essential activities of any business. Electronic commerce focuses on the use of ICT to enable the external activities and relationships of the business with individuals, groups and other businesses. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_business">Wikipedia article: eBusiness</a>)

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e-government

E-Government (short for electronic government, also known as e-gov, digital government, online government, or connected government) is digital interactions between a government and citizens (G2C), government and businesses/Commerce (G2B), government and employees, and also between government and governments /agencies (G2G). Essentially, the e-Government delivery models can be briefly summed up as (Jeong, 2007): G2C (Government to Citizens); G2B (Government to Businesses); G2E (Government to Employees); G2G (Government to Governments). This digital interaction consists of governance, information and communication technology (ICT), business process re-engineering (BPR), and e-citizen at all levels of government (city, state/provence, national, and international). (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-Government">Wikipedia article: E-Government</a>)

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e-learning

E-learning comprises all forms of electronically supported learning and teaching. The information and communication systems, whether networked or not, serve as specific media to implement the learning process. The term will still most likely be utilized to reference out-of-classroom and in-classroom educational experiences via technology, even as advances continue in regard to devices and curriculum. E-learning is essentially the computer and network-enabled transfer of skills and knowledge. E-learning applications and processes include Web-based learning, computer-based learning, virtual classroom opportunities and digital collaboration. Content is delivered via the Internet, intranet/extranet, audio or video tape, satellite TV, and CD-ROM. It can be self-paced or instructor-led and includes media in the form of text, image, animation, streaming video and audio. Abbreviations like CBT (Computer-Based Training), IBT (Internet-Based Training) or WBT (Web-Based Training) have been used as synonyms to e-learning. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-learning">Wikipedia article: E-learning</a>)

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e-research

The term e-Research (alternately spelled eResearch) refers to the use of information technology to support existing and new forms of research. E-research extends e-Science and cyberinfrastructure to other disciplines, including the humanities and social sciences. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-research">Wikipedia article: E-research</a>)

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e-science

E-Science (or eScience) is computationally intensive science that is carried out in highly distributed network environments, or science that uses immense data sets that require grid computing; the term sometimes includes technologies that enable distributed collaboration, such as the Access Grid. The term was created by John Taylor, the Director General of the United Kingdom's Office of Science and Technology in 1999 and was used to describe a large funding initiative starting in November 2000. Examples of the kind of science include social simulations, particle physics, earth sciences and bio-informatics. Particle physics has a well developed e-Science infrastructure in particular because of its need for adequate computing facilities for the analysis of results and storage of data originating from the CERN Large Hadron Collider, which started taking data in 2009. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-Science">Wikipedia article: E-Science</a>)

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ead

Encoded Archival Description is an XML standard for encoding archival finding aids, maintained by the Library of Congress in partnership with the Society of American Archivists. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encoded_Archival_Description">Wikipedia article: EAD</a>)

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ebook

An electronic book (also e-book, ebook, digital book) is a text and image-based publication in digital form produced on, published by, and readable on computers or other digital devices. Sometimes the equivalent of a conventional printed book, e-books can also be born digital. The Oxford Dictionary of English defines the e-book as "an electronic version of a printed book," but e-books can and do exist without any printed equivalent. E-books are usually read on dedicated hardware devices known as e-Readers or e-book devices. Personal computers and some cell phones can also be used to read e-books. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-book">Wikipedia article: E-book</a>)

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ebusiness

Electronic business, commonly referred to as "eBusiness" or "e-business", or an internet business, may be defined as the application of information and communication technologies (ICT) in support of all the activities of business. Commerce constitutes the exchange of products and services between businesses, groups and individuals and can be seen as one of the essential activities of any business. Electronic commerce focuses on the use of ICT to enable the external activities and relationships of the business with individuals, groups and other businesses. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_business">Wikipedia article: eBusiness</a>)

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ecmascript

ECMAScript is the scripting language standardized by Ecma International in the ECMA-262 specification and ISO/IEC 16262. The language is widely used for client-side scripting on the web, in the form of several well-known dialects such as JavaScript, JScript, and ActionScript. (Excerpt from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecmascript">Wikipedia article: ECMAScript</a>)

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ecms

An Electronic Copyright Management System (ECMS) is a scheme to make digital works harder to copy and easier to license. Some of these schemes emphasize the technology of making works 'harder to copy'; others emphasize ways of making it 'easier to pay for copying.' Commonly both elements are present, so the emphasis is a matter of degree. (Excerpt from <a href="http://itlaw.wikia.com/wiki/Electronic_copyright_management_system">this source</a>)

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