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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 595 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Termsort icon Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factor Charts

samba

Samba is a free software re-implementation, originally developed by Australian Andrew Tridgell, of the SMB/CIFS networking protocol. As of version 3, Samba provides file and print services for various Microsoft Windows clients and can integrate with a Windows Server domain, either as a Primary Domain Controller (PDC) or as a domain member. It can also be part of an Active Directory domain. Samba runs on most Unix and Unix-like systems, such as GNU / Linux, Solaris, AIX and the BSD variants, including Apple's Mac OS X Server (which was added to the Mac OS X client in version 10.2). Samba is standard on nearly all distributions of Linux and is commonly included as a basic system service on other Unix-based operating systems as well. Samba is released under the GNU General Public License. The name Samba comes from SMB (Server Message Block), the name of the standard protocol used by the Microsoft Windows network file system. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Samba)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 6

safari

Safari is a graphical web browser developed by Apple Inc. and included as part of the Mac OS X operating system. First released as a public beta on January 7, 2003 on the company's Mac OS X operating system, it became Apple's default browser beginning with Mac OS X v10.3 "Panther". Safari is also the native browser for iOS. A version of Safari for the Microsoft Windows operating system, first released on June 11, 2007, supports Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7. The latest stable release of the browser is 5.0.5, which is available as a free download for both Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. As of 2011, Safari is the fourth most widely used browser in the US, following Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, and Google Chrome, respectively. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Safari)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 10

ruby

Ruby is a dynamic, reflective, general-purpose object-oriented programming language that combines syntax inspired by Perl with Smalltalk-like features. Ruby originated in Japan during the mid-1990s and was first developed and designed by Yukihiro "Matz" Matsumoto. It was influenced primarily by Perl, Smalltalk, Eiffel, and Lisp. Ruby supports multiple programming paradigms, including functional, object oriented, imperative and reflective. It also has a dynamic type system and automatic memory management; it is therefore similar in varying respects to Python, Perl, Lisp, Dylan, Pike, and CLU. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Ruby)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 13

rtsp

The Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) is a network control protocol designed for use in entertainment and communications systems to control streaming media servers. The protocol is used for establishing and controlling media sessions between end points. Clients of media servers issue VCR-like commands, such as play and pause, to facilitate real-time control of playback of media files from the server. The transmission of streaming data itself is not a task of the RTSP protocol. Most RTSP servers use the Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) for media stream delivery, however some vendors implement proprietary transport protocols. The RTSP server from RealNetworks, for example, also features RealNetworks' proprietary RDT stream transport. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Real Time Streaming Protocol)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 2

rtf

The Rich Text Format (often abbreviated RTF) is a proprietary document file format with published specification developed by Microsoft Corporation since 1987 for Microsoft products and for cross-platform document interchange. Most word processors are able to read and write some versions of RTF. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RTF)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1%.
18 26

rss

RSS (most commonly expanded as Really Simple Syndication) is a family of web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works - such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video - in a standardized format. An RSS document (which is called a "feed", "web feed", or "channel") includes full or summarized text, plus metadata such as publishing dates and authorship. Web feeds benefit publishers by letting them syndicate content automatically. They benefit readers who want to subscribe to timely updates from favored websites or to aggregate feeds from many sites into one place. RSS feeds can be read using software called an "RSS reader", "feed reader", or "aggregator", which can be web-based, desktop-based, or mobile-device-based. A standardized XML file format allows the information to be published once and viewed by many different programs. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RSS)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 8.2%.
143 632 12.6

rslp

The Research Support Libraries Programme (RSLP) was a national initiative, funded by the four higher education funding bodies. It has brought together both traditional and new forms of access to library information, with specific reference to support for research. While the principal beneficiaries of the Programme have been researchers and their postgraduate research students in UK higher education institutions (HEIs), there have also been significant benefits for other groups. It started in the academic year 1999-2000 and finished on 31 July 2002. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.4%.
42 162

rich internet application

A Rich Internet Application (RIA) is a Web application that has many of the characteristics of desktop applications, typically delivered either by way of a site-specific browser, via a browser plug-in, independent sandboxes, or virtual machines. Adobe Flash, Java, and Microsoft Silverlight are currently the three most common platforms, with penetration rates around 99%, 80%, and 54% respectively (as of July 2010). Although new Web standards have emerged, they still use the principles behind RIAs. Users generally need to install a software framework using the computer's operating system before launching the application, which typically downloads, updates, verifies and executes the RIA. This is the main differentiator from JavaScript-based alternatives like Ajax that use built-in browser functionality to implement comparable interfaces. While some consider such interfaces to be RIAs, some consider them competitors to RIAs and others, including Gartner, treat them as similar but separate technologies. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RIA)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 2

rfid

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is a technology that uses communication through the use of radio waves to exchange data between a reader and an electronic tag attached to an object, for the purpose of identification and tracking. It is possible in the near future, RFID technology will continue to proliferate in our daily lives the way that bar code technology did over the forty years leading up to the turn of the 21st century bringing unobtrusive but remarkable changes when it was new. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RFID)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 14

rfc

In computer network engineering, a Request for Comments (RFC) is a memorandum published by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) describing methods, behaviors, research, or innovations applicable to the working of the Internet and Internet-connected systems. Through the Internet Society, engineers and computer scientists may publish discourse in the form of an RFC, either for peer review or simply to convey new concepts, information, or (occasionally) engineering humor. The IETF adopts some of the proposals published as RFCs as Internet standards. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Request for comments)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.1%.
19 61

restful

Representational State Transfer (REST) is a style of software architecture for distributed hypermedia systems such as the World Wide Web. The term Representational State Transfer was introduced and defined in 2000 by Roy Fielding in his doctoral dissertation. Fielding is one of the principal authors of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) specification versions 1.0 and 1.1. Conforming to the REST constraints is referred to as being 'RESTful'. A RESTful web service (also called a RESTful web API) is a simple web service implemented using HTTP and the principles of REST. It is a collection of resources, with three defined aspects: 1) the base URI for the web service, such as http://example.com/resources/ ; 2) the Internet media type of the data supported by the web service. This is often JSON, XML or YAML but can be any other valid Internet media type; 3) the set of operations supported by the web service using HTTP methods (e.g., POST, GET, PUT or DELETE). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RESTful web services)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 11 9.1

responsive design

Responsive Web Design (RWD) essentially indicates that a web site is crafted to use Cascading Style Sheets 3 media queries, an extension of the @media rule , with fluid proportion-based grids (which use percentages and EMs instead of pixels) , to adapt the layout to the viewing environment, and probably also use flexible images. As a result, users across a broad range of devices and browsers will have access to a single source of content, laid out so as to be easy to read and navigate with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling. "Mobile First" and "Progressive Enhancement / Unobtrusive JavaScript" (strategies for when a new site design is being considered) are related concepts that predated RWD: browsers of basic mobile phones do not understand media queries or Javascript, and it is wise to create a basic web site then enhance it for smart phones and PCs — rather than attempt "graceful degradation" to try to degrade a complex, image-heavy site to work on the most basic mobile phones. Browser detection and mobile device detection are two ways of deducing if Javascript and certain HTML and CSS features are supported, however Javascript libraries like Modernizr, jQuery, and jQuery Mobile that directly test for features/user agents are also popular. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Responsive design)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 9 11.1

resource sharing

In computing, a shared resource or network share is a device or piece of information on a computer that can be remotely accessed from another computer, typically via a local area network or an enterprise Intranet, transparently as if it were a resource in the local machine. Examples are shared file access (also known as disk sharing and folder sharing), shared printer access (printer sharing), shared scanner access, etc. The shared resource is called a shared disk (also known as mounted disk), shared drive volume, shared folder, shared file, shared document, shared printer or shared scanner. The term file sharing traditionally means shared file access, especially in the context of operating systems and LAN and Intranet services, for example in Microsoft Windows documentation. Though, as BitTorrent and similar applications became available in the early 2000's, the term file sharing increasingly has become associated with peer-to-peer file sharing over the Internet. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Resource sharing)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2%.
34 53

resource management

In organizational studies, resource management is the efficient and effective deployment for an organization's resources when they are needed. Such resources may include financial resources, inventory, human skills, production resources, or information technology (IT). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Resource management)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.9%.
33 59

resource discovery

Resource discovery encompasses locating and retrieving information in large, complex networked environments, including the internet. As volume increases year on year, digital information can be increasingly hard to find. JISC's resource discovery work seeks to provide advanced technical solutions that can help users within academia find their way through volumes of information, and more easily access published material. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 14.6%.
255 542 0.2

resource description and access

Resource Description and Access or RDA is a set of instructions for the cataloguing of books and other materials held in libraries and other cultural organizations such as museums and galleries. RDA is the successor to the second edition of the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR2), the current standard set of cataloguing guidelines for English language libraries. It was initially released in summer 2010, and in the United States, following widespread controversy amongst cataloguers, the three national libraries (Library of Congress, National Library of Medicine, and the National Agricultural Library) organized a nation-wide test of the new standards. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Resource Description and Access)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.2%.
21 251 3.6

resource description

The Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a family of World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) specifications originally designed as a metadata data model. It has come to be used as a general method for conceptual description or modeling of information that is implemented in web resources, using a variety of syntax formats. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RDF)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 4%.
70 60 1.7

research information management

Research information refers to administrative information about research projects, researchers, research outputs, funding, and so on. Universities need to manage information about the research they host, in order to inform strategic decisions about that research, to ease reporting to external stakeholders such as funding councils and research funders, and to offer useful services to those within and beyond the institution’s boundaries. There is a lot of work at the moment in this area in the UK, complementing that in other countries. In both the Netherlands and Denmark, for example, universities use a common system to document core information about research (METIS and PURE respectively). Both of these systems are based around the CERIF data model, as are other systems in use such as Converis and the publications-oriented system Symplectic and national systems such as HunCRIS (in Hungary) and SICRIS (in Slovenia). In the UK, JISC, HEFCE, the Research Councils and others are funding a range of work to help the sector better manage information about research, covering institutional infrastructure (joining up institutional systems), national infrastructure (building services and interoperability to share research information), as well as providing guidance, support and opportunities to share experiences and work together. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.6%.
11 23 4.3

research

Research can be defined as the search for knowledge, or as any systematic investigation, with an open mind, to establish novel facts, usually using a scientific method. The primary purpose for basic research (as opposed to applied research) is discovering, interpreting, and the development of methods and systems for the advancement of human knowledge on a wide variety of scientific matters of our world and the universe. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Research)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 69.7%.
1213 9739 3605.0

request for comments

In computer network engineering, a Request for Comments (RFC) is a memorandum published by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) describing methods, behaviors, research, or innovations applicable to the working of the Internet and Internet-connected systems. Through the Internet Society, engineers and computer scientists may publish discourse in the form of an RFC, either for peer review or simply to convey new concepts, information, or (occasionally) engineering humor. The IETF adopts some of the proposals published as RFCs as Internet standards. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Request for comments)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 4
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