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This page provides an overview of 595 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factorsort icon Charts

realaudio

RealAudio is a proprietary audio format developed by RealNetworks and first released in 1995. It uses a variety of audio codecs, ranging from low-bitrate formats that can be used over dialup modems, to high-fidelity formats for music. It can also be used as a streaming audio format, that is played at the same time as it is downloaded. In the past, many internet radio stations used RealAudio to stream their programming over the internet in real time. In recent years, however, the format has become less common and has given way to more popular audio formats. RealAudio was heavily used by the BBC websites until 2009, though due to its declining use, only BBC World Service is still available in this format. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RealAudio)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 7

redland

Redland is a set of free software libraries written in C that provide support for the Resource Description Framework (RDF), created by Dave Beckett (a former resident of Redland, Bristol). The packages that form Redland are: Redland RDF Application Framework providing the C RDF API; Raptor RDF Parser Toolkit for parsing and serializing RDF syntaxes (RDF/XML, N-Triples, Turtle, RSS tag soup, Atom); Rasqal RDF Query Library for executing RDF queries with RDQL and SPARQL; Redland Language Bindings for APIs to Redland in C#, Java, Objective-C, Perl, PHP, Python, Ruby and Tcl. Redland is a mature set of libraries, in development since 2000 and closely conformant to the relevant W3C specifications. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Redland)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

refworks

RefWorks is a web-based commercial citation manager — an application for managing references, retrieving bibliographic information, and designing texts in terms of their literature references. Subscribers can store their reference database online, allowing them to use and update it from anywhere, and to share data with other subscribers. Universities can subscribe on behalf of all their students and faculty, and the software enables linking to electronic editions of journals to which the university libraries hold subscriptions. This linking is accomplished by incorporating an institution's OpenURL resolver. A number of Canadian academic libraries that licence RefWorks for managing research online have moved their accounts to a Canadian server because of concerns that student and faculty members' research could be investigated under the USA Patriot Act if their data remain stored south of the border. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RefWorks)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.6%.
10 37

relax ng

In computing, RELAX NG (REgular LAnguage for XML Next Generation) is a schema language for XML, based on Murata Makoto's RELAX and James Clark's TREX. A RELAX NG schema specifies a pattern for the structure and content of an XML document. A RELAX NG schema is itself an XML document; however, RELAX NG also offers a popular compact, non-XML syntax. Compared to other popular schema languages, RELAX NG is relatively simple. It was defined by a committee specification of the OASIS RELAX NG technical committee in 2001 and 2002, and also by part two of the international standard ISO/IEC 19757: Document Schema Definition Languages (DSDL). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RELAX NG)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 3

request for comments

In computer network engineering, a Request for Comments (RFC) is a memorandum published by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) describing methods, behaviors, research, or innovations applicable to the working of the Internet and Internet-connected systems. Through the Internet Society, engineers and computer scientists may publish discourse in the form of an RFC, either for peer review or simply to convey new concepts, information, or (occasionally) engineering humor. The IETF adopts some of the proposals published as RFCs as Internet standards. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Request for comments)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 4

resource management

In organizational studies, resource management is the efficient and effective deployment for an organization's resources when they are needed. Such resources may include financial resources, inventory, human skills, production resources, or information technology (IT). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Resource management)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.9%.
33 59

resource sharing

In computing, a shared resource or network share is a device or piece of information on a computer that can be remotely accessed from another computer, typically via a local area network or an enterprise Intranet, transparently as if it were a resource in the local machine. Examples are shared file access (also known as disk sharing and folder sharing), shared printer access (printer sharing), shared scanner access, etc. The shared resource is called a shared disk (also known as mounted disk), shared drive volume, shared folder, shared file, shared document, shared printer or shared scanner. The term file sharing traditionally means shared file access, especially in the context of operating systems and LAN and Intranet services, for example in Microsoft Windows documentation. Though, as BitTorrent and similar applications became available in the early 2000's, the term file sharing increasingly has become associated with peer-to-peer file sharing over the Internet. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Resource sharing)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2%.
34 53

rfc

In computer network engineering, a Request for Comments (RFC) is a memorandum published by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) describing methods, behaviors, research, or innovations applicable to the working of the Internet and Internet-connected systems. Through the Internet Society, engineers and computer scientists may publish discourse in the form of an RFC, either for peer review or simply to convey new concepts, information, or (occasionally) engineering humor. The IETF adopts some of the proposals published as RFCs as Internet standards. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Request for comments)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.1%.
19 61

rfid

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) is a technology that uses communication through the use of radio waves to exchange data between a reader and an electronic tag attached to an object, for the purpose of identification and tracking. It is possible in the near future, RFID technology will continue to proliferate in our daily lives the way that bar code technology did over the forty years leading up to the turn of the 21st century bringing unobtrusive but remarkable changes when it was new. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RFID)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 14

rich internet application

A Rich Internet Application (RIA) is a Web application that has many of the characteristics of desktop applications, typically delivered either by way of a site-specific browser, via a browser plug-in, independent sandboxes, or virtual machines. Adobe Flash, Java, and Microsoft Silverlight are currently the three most common platforms, with penetration rates around 99%, 80%, and 54% respectively (as of July 2010). Although new Web standards have emerged, they still use the principles behind RIAs. Users generally need to install a software framework using the computer's operating system before launching the application, which typically downloads, updates, verifies and executes the RIA. This is the main differentiator from JavaScript-based alternatives like Ajax that use built-in browser functionality to implement comparable interfaces. While some consider such interfaces to be RIAs, some consider them competitors to RIAs and others, including Gartner, treat them as similar but separate technologies. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RIA)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 2

rslp

The Research Support Libraries Programme (RSLP) was a national initiative, funded by the four higher education funding bodies. It has brought together both traditional and new forms of access to library information, with specific reference to support for research. While the principal beneficiaries of the Programme have been researchers and their postgraduate research students in UK higher education institutions (HEIs), there have also been significant benefits for other groups. It started in the academic year 1999-2000 and finished on 31 July 2002. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.4%.
42 162

rtf

The Rich Text Format (often abbreviated RTF) is a proprietary document file format with published specification developed by Microsoft Corporation since 1987 for Microsoft products and for cross-platform document interchange. Most word processors are able to read and write some versions of RTF. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RTF)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1%.
18 26

rtsp

The Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) is a network control protocol designed for use in entertainment and communications systems to control streaming media servers. The protocol is used for establishing and controlling media sessions between end points. Clients of media servers issue VCR-like commands, such as play and pause, to facilitate real-time control of playback of media files from the server. The transmission of streaming data itself is not a task of the RTSP protocol. Most RTSP servers use the Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) for media stream delivery, however some vendors implement proprietary transport protocols. The RTSP server from RealNetworks, for example, also features RealNetworks' proprietary RDT stream transport. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Real Time Streaming Protocol)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 2

ruby

Ruby is a dynamic, reflective, general-purpose object-oriented programming language that combines syntax inspired by Perl with Smalltalk-like features. Ruby originated in Japan during the mid-1990s and was first developed and designed by Yukihiro "Matz" Matsumoto. It was influenced primarily by Perl, Smalltalk, Eiffel, and Lisp. Ruby supports multiple programming paradigms, including functional, object oriented, imperative and reflective. It also has a dynamic type system and automatic memory management; it is therefore similar in varying respects to Python, Perl, Lisp, Dylan, Pike, and CLU. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Ruby)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 13

safari

Safari is a graphical web browser developed by Apple Inc. and included as part of the Mac OS X operating system. First released as a public beta on January 7, 2003 on the company's Mac OS X operating system, it became Apple's default browser beginning with Mac OS X v10.3 "Panther". Safari is also the native browser for iOS. A version of Safari for the Microsoft Windows operating system, first released on June 11, 2007, supports Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7. The latest stable release of the browser is 5.0.5, which is available as a free download for both Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. As of 2011, Safari is the fourth most widely used browser in the US, following Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, and Google Chrome, respectively. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Safari)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 10

samba

Samba is a free software re-implementation, originally developed by Australian Andrew Tridgell, of the SMB/CIFS networking protocol. As of version 3, Samba provides file and print services for various Microsoft Windows clients and can integrate with a Windows Server domain, either as a Primary Domain Controller (PDC) or as a domain member. It can also be part of an Active Directory domain. Samba runs on most Unix and Unix-like systems, such as GNU / Linux, Solaris, AIX and the BSD variants, including Apple's Mac OS X Server (which was added to the Mac OS X client in version 10.2). Samba is standard on nearly all distributions of Linux and is commonly included as a basic system service on other Unix-based operating systems as well. Samba is released under the GNU General Public License. The name Samba comes from SMB (Server Message Block), the name of the standard protocol used by the Microsoft Windows network file system. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Samba)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 6

saml

Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) is an XML-based open standard for exchanging authentication and authorization data between security domains, that is, between an identity provider (a producer of assertions) and a service provider (a consumer of assertions). SAML is a product of the OASIS Security Services Technical Committee. The single most important problem that SAML is trying to solve is the Web Browser Single Sign-On (SSO) problem, a problem also addressed by the OpenID protocol. Single sign-on solutions are abundant at the intranet level (using cookies, for example) but extending these solutions beyond the intranet has been problematic and has led to the proliferation of non-interoperable proprietary technologies. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: SAML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 10

scholarly works application profile

The Scholarly Works Application Profile (SWAP) has been created by a working group whose objectives were to develop: a Dublin Core application profile for eprints; any implementation / cataloguing rules that might be necessary to support functionality offered by the search service (such as fielded searches of the metadata or indexing the full-text of the research paper); a plan for early community acceptance and take-up, bearing in mind current practice. This application was originally called the 'Eprints Application Profile', but this name has now been superseded by 'Scholarly Works Application Profile' (SWAP) - the two profiles are synonymous. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 8

scorm

Sharable Content Object Reference Model (SCORM) is a collection of standards and specifications for web-based e-learning. It defines communications between client side content and a host system called the run-time environment, which is commonly supported by a learning management system. SCORM also defines how content may be packaged into a transferable ZIP file called "Package Interchange Format". (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: SCORM)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 30

screencast

A screencast is a digital recording of computer screen output, also known as a video screen capture, often containing audio narration. The term screencast compares with the related term screenshot; whereas screenshot is a picture of a computer screen, a screencast is essentially a movie of the changes over time that a user sees on a computer screen, enhanced with audio narration. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Screencast)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 4
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