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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 596 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articlessort icon Total usage Trending factor Charts

rdfa

RDFa (or Resource Description Framework - in - attributes) is a W3C Recommendation that adds a set of attribute level extensions to XHTML for embedding rich metadata within Web documents. The RDF data model mapping enables its use for embedding RDF triples within XHTML documents, it also enables the extraction of RDF model triples by compliant user agents. The W3C RDF in XHTML Taskforce is also working on an implementation for non-XML versions of HTML. The primary issue for the non-XML implementation is how to handle the lack of XML namespaces. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RDFa)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 9

utf-8

UTF-8 (UCS Transformation Format - 8-bit) is a multibyte character encoding for Unicode. UTF-8 is like UTF-16 and UTF-32, because it can represent every character in the Unicode character set. But unlike UTF-16 and UTF-32, it possesses the advantages of being backward-compatible with ASCII. And it has the advantage of avoiding the complications of endianness and the resulting need to use byte order marks (BOM). For these and other reasons, UTF-8 has become the dominant character encoding for the World-Wide Web, accounting for more than half of all Web pages. The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) requires all Internet protocols to identify the encoding used for character data, and the supported character encodings must include UTF-8. The Internet Mail Consortium (IMC) recommends that all e‑mail programs be able to display and create mail using UTF-8. UTF-8 is also increasingly being used as the default character encoding in operating systems, programming languages, APIs, and software applications. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: UTF-8)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 12

wav

Waveform Audio File Format (WAVE, or more commonly known as WAV due to its filename extension), (also, but rarely, named, Audio for Windows) is a Microsoft and IBM audio file format standard for storing an audio bitstream on PCs. It is an application of the RIFF bitstream format method for storing data in "chunks", and thus is also close to the 8SVX and the AIFF format used on Amiga and Macintosh computers, respectively. It is the main format used on Windows systems for raw and typically uncompressed audio. The usual bitstream encoding is the linear pulse-code modulation (LPCM) format. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: WAV)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 9

windows media

Windows Media is a multimedia framework for media creation and distribution for Microsoft Windows. It consists of a software development kit with several application programming interfaces and a number of prebuilt technologies, and is the replacement of NetShow technologies. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Windows Media)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 15

xml namespaces

XML namespaces are used for providing uniquely named elements and attributes in an XML document. They are defined in a W3C recommendation. An XML instance may contain element or attribute names from more than one XML vocabulary. If each vocabulary is given a namespace then the ambiguity between identically named elements or attributes can be resolved. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: XML Namespace)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 9

z39.88

OpenURL is a standardized format (Z39.88) of Uniform Resource Locator (URL) intended to enable Internet users to more easily find a copy of a resource that they are allowed to access. Although OpenURL can be used with any kind of resource on the Internet, it is most heavily used by libraries to help connect patrons to subscription content. The OpenURL standard is designed to enable linking from information resources such as abstracting and indexing databases (sources) to library services (targets), such as academic journals, whether online or in printed or other formats. The linking is mediated by "link resolvers", or "link-servers", which parse the elements of an OpenURL and provide links to appropriate targets available through a library by the use of an OpenURL knowledge base. The source that generates an OpenURL is typically a bibliographic citation or bibliographic record in a database that indexes the information resources often found in libraries, such as articles, books, patents, etc. Examples of such databases include Ovid, Web of Science, SciFinder, Modern Languages Association Bibliography and Google Scholar. A target is a resource or service that helps satisfy a user's information needs. Examples of targets include full-text repositories, online journals, online library catalogs and other Web resources and services. The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has developed OpenURL and its data container (the ContextObject) as American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard Z39.88. On 22 June 2006, the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was named the maintenance agency for the standard. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: OpenUrl)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 11

ark

Archival Resource Key (ARK) is a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) that provides a multi-purpose identifier given to information objects of any type. ARKs contain the label ark: in the URL, which sets the expectation that the URL terminated by '?' returns a brief metadata record, and the URL terminated by '??' returns metadata that includes a commitment statement from the current service provider. While ARKs have application in identifier persistence, the ARK scheme sees persistence as purely a matter of service and not a property of a naming syntax. The ARK inflections '?' and '??' are designed to permit service providers to convey to users some sense of their ability to provide persistence. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: ARK)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 45

crm

Customer relationship management (CRM) is a widely-implemented strategy for managing a company's interactions with customers, clients and sales prospects. It involves using technology to organize, automate, and synchronize business processes - principally sales activities, but also those for marketing, customer service, and technical support. The overall goals are to find, attract, and win new clients, nurture and retain those the company already has, entice former clients back into the fold, and reduce the costs of marketing and client service. Customer relationship management describes a company-wide business strategy including customer-interface departments as well as other departments. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Customer relationship management)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 15

gpl

The GNU General Public License (GNU GPL or simply GPL) is the most widely used free software license, originally written by Richard Stallman for the GNU project. The GPL is the first copyleft license for general use, which means that derived works can only be distributed under the same license terms. Under this philosophy, the GPL grants the recipients of a computer program the rights of the free software definition and uses copyleft to ensure the freedoms are preserved, even when the work is changed or added to. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD licenses are the standard examples. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: GPL)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 19

named entity recognition

Named entity recognition (NER) (also known as entity identification and entity extraction) is a subtask of information extraction that seeks to locate and classify atomic elements in text into predefined categories such as the names of persons, organizations, locations, expressions of times, quantities, monetary values, percentages, etc. State-of-the-art NER systems for English produce near-human performance. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Named entity recognition)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 10

rdbms

A relational database management system (RDBMS) is a database management system (DBMS) that is based on the relational model as introduced by E. F. Codd. Most popular databases currently in use are based on the relational database model. A short definition of an RDBMS is: a DBMS in which data is stored in tables and the relationships among the data are also stored in tables. The data can be accessed or reassembled in many different ways without having to change the table forms. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Relational database management system (RDBMS))

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 17

restful

Representational State Transfer (REST) is a style of software architecture for distributed hypermedia systems such as the World Wide Web. The term Representational State Transfer was introduced and defined in 2000 by Roy Fielding in his doctoral dissertation. Fielding is one of the principal authors of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) specification versions 1.0 and 1.1. Conforming to the REST constraints is referred to as being 'RESTful'. A RESTful web service (also called a RESTful web API) is a simple web service implemented using HTTP and the principles of REST. It is a collection of resources, with three defined aspects: 1) the base URI for the web service, such as http://example.com/resources/ ; 2) the Internet media type of the data supported by the web service. This is often JSON, XML or YAML but can be any other valid Internet media type; 3) the set of operations supported by the web service using HTTP methods (e.g., POST, GET, PUT or DELETE). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RESTful web services)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 11

ruby

Ruby is a dynamic, reflective, general-purpose object-oriented programming language that combines syntax inspired by Perl with Smalltalk-like features. Ruby originated in Japan during the mid-1990s and was first developed and designed by Yukihiro "Matz" Matsumoto. It was influenced primarily by Perl, Smalltalk, Eiffel, and Lisp. Ruby supports multiple programming paradigms, including functional, object oriented, imperative and reflective. It also has a dynamic type system and automatic memory management; it is therefore similar in varying respects to Python, Perl, Lisp, Dylan, Pike, and CLU. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Ruby)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 13

smil

SMIL, the Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language, is a W3C recommended XML markup language for describing multimedia presentations. It defines markup for timing, layout, animations, visual transitions, and media embedding, among other things. SMIL allows the presentation of media items such as text, images, video, and audio, as well as links to other SMIL presentations, and files from multiple web servers. SMIL markup is written in XML, and has similarities to HTML. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: SMIL)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 32

social web

The Social Web is a specified term for the World Wide Web as a kind of Social Media. The term is currently used to describe how people socialize or interact with each other throughout the Web. The Social Web mostly refers to social networking, myspace for example, and content-sharing sites (which also offer a social networking functionality) within Web 2.0. These social websites are mostly formed around the connections of people of the same interest, but there are several theories that specifies exactly how this formation works. There are for example said to be "people focus" websites such as PalBlast, Bebo, Facebook, and Myspace, that focus of social interaction, often by making the user create an online identity (and a profile). There is also socializing on the web that is typified by "hobby focus". For example, if one is interested in photography and wants to share this with like-minded people, then there are photography websites such as Flickr, Kodak Gallery and Photobucket. Often when speaking about the Social Web, collective intelligence is mentioned. Collective intelligence refers to the phenomena of internet users getting together, sharing content, in order to create something bigger than one single person could do. Sometimes, this is also called Wisdom of Crowds. Wikipedia is a perfect example of this. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Social web)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 14

xpointer

XPointer is a system for addressing components of XML based internet media. XPointer is divided among four specifications: a "framework" which forms the basis for identifying XML fragments, a positional element addressing scheme, a scheme for namespaces, and a scheme for XPath-based addressing. XPointer Framework is a recommendation since March 2003. The XPointer language is designed to address structural aspects of XML, including text content and other information objects created as a result of parsing the document. Thus, it could be used to point to a section of a document highlighted by a user through a mouse drag action. XPointer is covered by a royalty-free technology patent held by Sun Microsystems. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Xpointer)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 26

android

Android is a software stack for mobile devices that includes an operating system, middleware and key applications. Google Inc. purchased the initial developer of the software, Android Inc., in 2005. Android's mobile operating system is based on a modified version of the Linux kernel. Google and other members of the Open Handset Alliance collaborated on Android's development and release. The Android Open Source Project (AOSP) is tasked with the maintenance and further development of Android. The Android operating system is the world's best-selling Smartphone platform. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Android (operating system))

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 16 100

avi

Audio Video Interleave (also Audio Video Interleaved), known by its acronym AVI, is a multimedia container format introduced by Microsoft in November 1992 as part of its Video for Windows technology. AVI files can contain both audio and video data in a file container that allows synchronous audio-with-video playback. Like the DVD video format, AVI files support multiple streaming audio and video, although these features are seldom used. Most AVI files also use the file format extensions developed by the Matrox OpenDML group in February 1996. These files are supported by Microsoft, and are unofficially called "AVI 2.0". (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: AVI)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 12

bibliometrics

Bibliometrics is a set of methods to quantitatively analyze academic literature. Citation analysis and content analysis are commonly used bibliometric methods. While bibliometric methods are most often used in the field of library and information science, bibliometrics have wide applications in other areas. Many research fields use bibliometric methods to explore the impact of their field, the impact of a set of researchers, or the impact of a particular paper. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Bibliometrics)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 21

content negotiation

Content negotiation is a mechanism defined in the HTTP specification that makes it possible to serve different versions of a document (or more generally, a resource) at the same URI, so that user agents can specify which version fit their capabilities the best. One classical use of this mechanism is to serve an image in GIF or PNG format, so that a browser that cannot display PNG images (e.g. MS Internet Explorer 4) will be served the GIF version. To summarize how this works, when a user agent submits a request to a server, the user agent informs the server what media types it understands with ratings of how well it understands them. More precisely, the user agent provides an Accept HTTP header that lists acceptable media types and associated quality factors. The server is then able to supply the version of the resource that best fits the user agent's needs. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Content negotiation)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 20
CSVXML
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by Dr. Radut