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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 595 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usagesort icon Trending factor Charts

datamining

Data mining (the analysis step of the knowledge discovery in databases process, or KDD), a relatively young and interdisciplinary field of computer science is the process of discovering new patterns from large data sets involving methods at the intersection of artificial intelligence, machine learning, statistics and database systems. The overall goal of the data mining process is to extract knowledge from a data set in a human-understandable structure and besides the raw analysis step involves database and data management aspects, data preprocessing, model and inference considerations, interestingness metrics, complexity considerations, post-processing of found structure, visualization and online updating. The actual data mining task is the automatic or semi-automatic analysis of large quantities of data to extract previously unknown interesting patterns such as groups of data records (cluster analysis), unusual records (anomaly detection) and dependencies (association rule mining). This usually involves using database techniques such as spatial indexes. These patterns can then be seen as a kind of summary of the input data, and used in further analysis or for example in machine learning and predictive analytics. For example, the data mining step might identify multiple groups in the data, which can then be used to obtain more accurate prediction results by a decision support system. Neither the data collection, data preparation nor result interpretation and reporting are part of the data mining step, but do belong to the overall KDD process as additional steps. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Data mining)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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dexy

Dexy is a tool for writing documents which relate to code. This might mean software documentation, journal articles relating to computational research, a code tutorial on your blog, writing up computer science class assignments, pretty much anything. You can think of Dexy as a very fancy 'make' tool with lots of document-related features and powerful filters. Dexy is open source, licensed under the MIT license. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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dirac

Dirac is an open and royalty-free video compression format, specification and system developed by BBC Research at the BBC. Schrödinger and dirac-research (formerly just called 'Dirac') are open and royalty-free software implementations (video codecs) of Dirac. Dirac format aims to provide high-quality video compression for Ultra HDTV and beyond, and as such competes with existing formats such as H.264 and VC-1. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Dirac)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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equella

EQUELLA is a digital repository that provides one system to house teaching and learning, research, media and library content. EQUELLA has been deployed for copyright resource collections, research materials, managing and exposing materials through web sites and portals, content authoring, workflow, institutional policy and document management. EQUELLA is currently in use in a wide range of schools, districts, universities, community colleges, state systems and departments of education, government. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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gnu lesser general public license

The GNU Lesser General Public License (formerly the GNU Library General Public License) or LGPL is a free software license published by the Free Software Foundation (FSF). It was designed as a compromise between the strong-copyleft GNU General Public License or GPL and permissive licenses such as the BSD licenses and the MIT License. The GNU Library General Public License (as the LGPL was originally named) was published in 1991, and was the version number 2 for parity with GPL version 2. The LGPL was revised in minor ways in the 2.1 point release, published in 1999, when it was renamed the GNU Lesser General Public License to reflect the FSF's position that not all libraries should use it. Version 3 of the LGPL was published in 2007 as a list of additional permissions applied to GPL version 3. The LGPL places copyleft restrictions on the program itself but does not apply these restrictions to other software that merely links with the program. There are, however, certain other restrictions on this software. The LGPL is primarily used for software libraries, although it is also used by some stand-alone applications, most notably Mozilla and OpenOffice.org and sometimes media as well. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: GNU Lesser General Public License)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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google refine

Google Refine is a standalone desktop application provided by Google for data cleanup and transformation to other formats. It has now been renamed to OpenRefine and is hosted as an opensource project on Github. It is similar to spreadsheet applications (and can work with spreadsheet file formats), however acts more like database. It operates on rows of data which have cells under columns, which is very similar to relational database tables. One Refine project is one table. User can filter rows to display using facets that define filtering criteria (for example, showing rows where given column is not empty). Unlike spreadsheets, most operations in Refine are done on all visible rows: transformation of all cells in all rows under one column, creation of new column based on existing column data, etc. All actions that were done on dataset are stored in project and can be replayed on another dataset. Unlike spreadsheets, no formulas are stored in cells, but formulas are used to transform data, and transformation is done only once. Transformation expressions are written in proprietary GREL language. Also Jython can be used to write expressions. The program has a web user interface, however it is not hosted by the software developer (SAAS), but is available for download and use on local machine. When starting Refine, it starts a web server and starts browser to open web UI powered by this webserver. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Google Refine)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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h.263

H.263 is a video compression standard originally designed as a low-bitrate compressed format for videoconferencing. It was developed by the ITU-T Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) in a project ending in 1995/1996 as one member of the H.26x family of video coding standards in the domain of the ITU-T. H.263 has since found many applications on the internet: much Flash Video content (as used on sites such as YouTube, Google Video, MySpace, etc.) used to be encoded in Sorenson Spark format (an incomplete implementation of H.263), though many sites now use VP6 or H.264 encoding. The original version of the RealVideo codec was based on H.263 up until the release of RealVideo 8. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: H.263)

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haptics

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i-mode

NTT DoCoMo's i-mode is a mobile internet (as opposed to wireless internet) service popular in Japan. Unlike Wireless Application Protocol or WAP, i-mode encompasses a wider variety of internet standards, including web access, e-mail and the packet-switched network that delivers the data. i-mode users have access to various services such as e-mail, sports results, weather forecast, games, financial services and ticket booking. Content is provided by specialized services, typically from the mobile carrier, which allows them to have tighter control over billing. Like WAP, i-mode delivers only those services that are specifically converted for the service, or are converted through gateways. This has placed both systems at a disadvantage against handsets that use "real" browser software, and generally use a flat pricing structure for data. Even i-mode's creator, Takeshi Natsuno, has stated "I believe the iPhone (a phone that uses the traditional TCP/IP model) is closer to the mobile phone of the future, compared with the latest Japanese mobile phones." (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: i-mode)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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icalendar

iCalendar is a computer file format which allows Internet users to send meeting requests and tasks to other Internet users, via email, or sharing files with an extension of .ics. Recipients of the iCalendar data file (with supporting software, such as an email client or calendar application) can respond to the sender easily or counter propose another meeting date/time. iCalendar is used and supported by a large number of products, including Google Calendar, Apple iCal, GoDaddy Online Group Calendar, IBM Lotus Notes, Yahoo! Calendar and partially also by Microsoft Outlook. iCalendar is designed to be independent of the transport protocol. For example, certain events can be sent by traditional email or whole calendar files can be shared and edited by using a WebDav server, or SyncML. Simple web servers (using just the HTTP protocol) are often used to distribute iCalendar data about an event and to publish busy times of an individual. Publishers can embed iCalendar data in web pages using hCalendar, a 1:1 microformat representation of iCalendar in semantic (X)HTML. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: iCalendar)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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ims common cartridge

The Common Cartridge defines a new package interchange format for learning content, able to run on any compliant LMS platform. Version 1.0 supports the following features: rich content (html, xml, web links, media files); integrated assessments; discussion forums; authorisation for protected content. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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kml

Keyhole Markup Language (KML) is an XML notation for expressing geographic annotation and visualization within Internet-based, two-dimensional maps and three-dimensional Earth browsers. KML was developed for use with Google Earth, which was originally named Keyhole Earth Viewer. It was created by Keyhole, Inc, which was acquired by Google in 2004. The name "Keyhole" is an homage to the KH reconnaissance satellites, the original eye-in-the-sky military reconnaissance system first launched in 1976. KML is an international standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium. Google Earth was the first program able to view and graphically edit KML files. Other projects such as Marble have also started to develop KML support.[ (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: KML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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learning platforms

A learning platform is an integrated set of interactive online services that provide teachers, learners, parents and others involved in education with information, tools and resources to support and enhance educational delivery and management. The term learning platform refers to a range of tools and services often described using terms such as educational extranet, VLE, LMS, ILMS and LCMS providing learning and content management. The term learning platform also includes the personal learning environment (PLE) or personal online learning space (POLS), including tools and systems that allow the development and management of eportfolios. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Learning platform)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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lzw

Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) is a universal lossless data compression algorithm created by Abraham Lempel, Jacob Ziv, and Terry Welch. It was published by Welch in 1984 as an improved implementation of the LZ78 algorithm published by Lempel and Ziv in 1978. The algorithm is simple to implement, and has the potential for very high throughput in hardware implementations. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: LZW)

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muves

MUVE (plural MUVEs) refers to online, multi-user virtual environments, sometimes called virtual worlds. While this term has been used previously to refer to a generational change in MUDs, MOOs, and MMORPGs, it is most widely used to describe MMOGs that are not necessarily game-specific. The term was first used in Chip Morningstar's 1990 paper The Lessons of Lucasfilm's Habitat. A number of the most popular and well-known MUVEs are listed below, although there are a number of others. Modern MUVEs have 3D third-person graphics, are accessed over the Internet, allow for some dozens of simultaneous users to interact, and represent a persistent virtual world. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: MUVE)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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native applications

A native application (native app) is an application program that has been developed for use on a particular platform or device. Because native apps are written for a specific platform, they can interact with and take advantage of operating system features and other software that is typically installed on that platform. Because a native app is built for a particular device and its operating system, it has the ability to use device-specific hardware and software, meaning that native apps can take advantage of the latest technology available on mobile devices such as a global positioning system (GPS) and camera. This can be construed as an advantage for native apps over Web apps or mobile cloud apps. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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oasis saml

Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) is an XML-based open standard for exchanging authentication and authorization data between security domains, that is, between an identity provider (a producer of assertions) and a service provider (a consumer of assertions). SAML is a product of the OASIS Security Services Technical Committee. The single most important problem that SAML is trying to solve is the Web Browser Single Sign-On (SSO) problem, a problem also addressed by the OpenID protocol. Single sign-on solutions are abundant at the intranet level (using cookies, for example) but extending these solutions beyond the intranet has been problematic and has led to the proliferation of non-interoperable proprietary technologies. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: SAML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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object oriented software

Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a programming paradigm using "objects" - data structures consisting of data fields and methods together with their interactions - to design applications and computer programs. Programming techniques may include features such as data abstraction, encapsulation, messaging, modularity, polymorphism, and inheritance. Many modern programming languages now support OOP. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Object oriented programming)

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opm

The Open Provenance Model OPM is the result of the Provenance Challenge series that was initiated in May 2006, at the first IPAW workshop. OPM was originally crafted in a meeting held in Salt Lake City in August 2007. OPM v1.00 was released to the community in December 2007. The first OPM workshop in June 2008 involved some twenty participants discussing issues related to this specification, and led to a revised specification, referred to as OPM v1.01. From the outset, the original authors' intent has been to define a data model that is open from an inter-operability viewpoint but also with respect to the community of its contributors, reviewers and users. To ensure that these principles are adhered to, an "open source like" governance model for OPM was adopted in June 2009, which led to the development of OPM v1.1, the most recent version of the model, which went under a public revision process (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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osid

Open Service Interface Definitions (OSIDs) are programmatic interface specifications describing services. These interfaces are specified by the Open Knowledge Initiative (O.K.I.) to implement a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) to achieve interoperability among applications across a varied base of underlying and changing technologies. To preserve the investment in development, program logic is separated from underlying technologies through the use of software interfaces each of which defines a contract between a service consumer and a service provider. This separation is the basis of any valid SOA. While some methods define the service interface boundary at a protocol or server level, OSIDs place the boundary at the application level to effectively insulate the consumer from protocols, server identities, and utility libraries that are in the domain to a service provider resulting in software which is easier to develop, longer lasting, and usable across a wider array of computing environments. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Open Service Interface Definitions (OSIDs))

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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