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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 596 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Termsort icon Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factor Charts

archives

An archive is a collection of historical records, or the physical place they are located. Archives contain primary source documents that have accumulated over the course of an individual or organization's lifetime, and are kept to show the function of an organization. In general, archives consist of records that have been selected for permanent or long-term preservation on grounds of their enduring cultural, historical, or evidentiary value. Archival records are normally unpublished and almost always unique, unlike books or magazines for which many identical copies exist. This means that archives (the places) are quite distinct from libraries with regard to their functions and organization, although archival collections can often be found within library buildings. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Archive)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 42.1%.
735 4350 1.6

ark

Archival Resource Key (ARK) is a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) that provides a multi-purpose identifier given to information objects of any type. ARKs contain the label ark: in the URL, which sets the expectation that the URL terminated by '?' returns a brief metadata record, and the URL terminated by '??' returns metadata that includes a commitment statement from the current service provider. While ARKs have application in identifier persistence, the ARK scheme sees persistence as purely a matter of service and not a property of a naming syntax. The ARK inflections '?' and '??' are designed to permit service providers to convey to users some sense of their ability to provide persistence. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: ARK)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 45

article-level metrics

Article-level metrics are metrics which measure the usage and impact of individual research articles. Traditionally, bibliometrics have been used to evaluate the usage and impact of research, but have usually been focused on journal-level metrics such as the impact factor or researcher-level metrics such as the h-index. Article-level metrics, on the other hand, may demonstrate the impact of an individual article. This is related to, but distinct from, altmetrics. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Article-level metrics)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1 100

ascii

The American Standard Code for Information Interchange is a character-encoding scheme based on the ordering of the English alphabet. ASCII codes represent text in computers, communications equipment, and other devices that use text. Most modern character-encoding schemes are based on ASCII, though they support many more characters than did ASCII. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: ASCII)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.2%.
39 83

asf

The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) is a non-profit corporation (classified as 501(c)(3) in the United States) to support Apache software projects, including the Apache HTTP Server. The ASF was formed from the Apache Group and incorporated in Delaware, U.S., in June 1999. The Apache Software Foundation is a decentralized community of developers. The software they produce is distributed under the terms of the Apache License and is therefore free and open source software (FOSS). The Apache projects are characterized by a collaborative, consensus-based development process and an open and pragmatic software license. Each project is managed by a self-selected team of technical experts who are active contributors to the project. The ASF is a meritocracy, implying that membership to the foundation is granted only to volunteers who have actively contributed to Apache projects. The ASF is considered a second generation open-source organization. Among the ASF's objectives are to provide legal protection to volunteers working on Apache projects, and to prevent the Apache brand name from being used by other organizations without permission. The ASF also holds several ApacheCon conferences each year, highlighting Apache projects, related technology, and encouraging Apache developers to gather together. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Apache Software Foundation)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 6

asx

The Advanced Stream Redirector (ASX) format is a type of XML metafile designed to store a list of Windows Media files to play during a multimedia presentation. It is used frequently on streaming video servers where multiple ASF files are to be played in succession. Both RTSP and MMS streaming protocols are supported, as well as HTTP. ASX files have MIME type video/x-ms-asf (as do ASF files). With the introduction of the WMA and WMV container formats, WAX and WVX extensions have also been introduced by Microsoft respectively. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Advanced Stream Redirector (ASX) format)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 7

atom

The name Atom applies to a pair of related standards. The Atom Syndication Format is an XML language used for web feeds, while the Atom Publishing Protocol (AtomPub or APP) is a simple HTTP-based protocol for creating and updating web resources. The Atom format was developed as an alternative to RSS. Ben Trott, an advocate of the new format that became Atom, believed that RSS had limitations and flaws - such as lack of on-going innovation and its necessity to remain backward compatible - and that there were advantages to a fresh design.Proponents of the new format formed the IETF Atom Publishing Format and Protocol Workgroup. The Atom syndication format was published as an IETF proposed standard in RFC 4287 (December 2005), and the Atom Publishing Protocol was published as RFC 5023 (October 2007). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Atom)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.3%.
23 60

audio codec

In software, an "audio codec" is a computer program that compresses/decompresses digital audio data according to a given audio file format or streaming audio format. The object of the algorithm is to represent the high-fidelity audio signal with minimum number of bits while retaining the quality. This can effectively reduce the storage space and the bandwidth required for transmission of the stored audio file. Most codecs are implemented as libraries which interface to one or more multimedia players, such as QuickTime Player, XMMS, Winamp, VLC media player, MPlayer or Windows Media Player. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Audio codec)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

augmented reality

Augmented reality (AR) is a term for a live direct or an indirect view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are augmented by computer-generated sensory input, such as sound or graphics. It is related to a more general concept called mediated reality, in which a view of reality is modified (possibly even diminished rather than augmented) by a computer. As a result, the technology functions by enhancing one's current perception of reality. By contrast, virtual reality replaces the real world with a simulated one. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Augmented reality)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.6%.
11 44 2.3

authentication

Authentication is the act of confirming the truth of an attribute of a datum or entity. This might involve confirming the identity of a person, tracing the origins of an artifact, ensuring that a product is what its packaging and labeling claims to be, or assuring that a computer program is a trusted one. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Authentication)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 10.2%.
178 436

authentication service

An authentication service is a structured network service that determines that the digital ID being presented to a network service is being used by the real-world individual who has the rights to use it. This is often achieved through the use of a username/password combination or a digital certificate, depending on the degree of assurance required. (Excerpt from JISC Information Environment Glossary)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 7

authorisation service

An authorisation service is a structured network service that indicates whether a particular digital ID has the necessary access-rights to access a particular resource. (Excerpt from JISC Information Environment Glossary)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 4

authority data

Functional Requirements for Authority Data (FRAD), formerly known as Functional Requirements for Authority Records (FRAR) is a conceptual entity-relationship model developed by the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) for relating the data that are recorded in library authority records to the needs of the users of those records and facilitate and sharing of that data. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: FRAD)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 8

avatar

In computing, an avatar is the graphical representation of the user or the user's alter ego or character. It may take either a three-dimensional form, as in games or virtual worlds, or a two-dimensional form as an icon in Internet forums and other online communities. It can also refer to a text construct found on early systems such as MUDs. It is an object representing the user. The term "avatar" can also refer to the personality connected with the screen name, or handle, of an Internet user. For other meanings of this term, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avatar_(disambiguation) . (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Avatar)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 14

avi

Audio Video Interleave (also Audio Video Interleaved), known by its acronym AVI, is a multimedia container format introduced by Microsoft in November 1992 as part of its Video for Windows technology. AVI files can contain both audio and video data in a file container that allows synchronous audio-with-video playback. Like the DVD video format, AVI files support multiple streaming audio and video, although these features are seldom used. Most AVI files also use the file format extensions developed by the Matrox OpenDML group in February 1996. These files are supported by Microsoft, and are unofficially called "AVI 2.0". (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: AVI)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 12

bath profile

The Bath Profile is an international Z39.50 Specification for Library Applications and Resource Discovery The syntax of Z39.50 is abstracted from the underlying database structure; for example, if the client specifies an author search (Use attribute 1003), it is up to the server to determine how to map that search to the indexes it has at hand. This allows Z39.50 queries to be formulated without having to know anything about the target database; but it also means that results for the same query can vary widely among different servers. One server may have an author index; another may use its index of personal names, whether they are authors or not; another may have no suitable index and fall back on its keyword index; and another may have no suitable index and return an error. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Bath Profile)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.4%.
24 74

bibliographic control

In library and information science, bibliographic control (also known as information organization or bibliographic organization) is the process by which information resources are described so that users are able to find and select that information resource. An information resource could be a book, a movie, or an image, among other things. By providing a name, title, and subject access to the description, a bibliographic record is created. This bibliographic record, which is essentially metadata, is indexed by an information retrieval tool (such as a database or a search engine) so that a user can find out whether or not the information resource is relevant to them. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Bibliographic control)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.9%.
16 20

bibliographic data

A bibliographic database is a database of bibliographic records, an organized digital collection of references to published literature, including journal and newspaper articles, conference proceedings, reports, government and legal publications, patents, books, etc. In contrast to library catalogue entries, a large proportion of the bibliographic records in bibliographic databases describe analytics (articles, conference papers, etc.) rather than complete monographs, and they generally contain very rich subject descriptions in the form of keywords, subject classification terms, or abstracts. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Bibliographic data)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 20%.
348 728 0.1

bibliographic database

A bibliographic database is a database of bibliographic records, an organized digital collection of references to published literature, including journal and newspaper articles, conference proceedings, reports, government and legal publications, patents, books, etc. In contrast to library catalogue entries, a large proportion of the bibliographic records in bibliographic databases describe analytics (articles, conference papers, etc.) rather than complete monographs, and they generally contain very rich subject descriptions in the form of keywords, subject classification terms, or abstracts. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Bibliographic database)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.7%.
30 40

bibliographic record

A bibliographic record is an entry being a uniform representation and description of a specific content item in a bibliographic database (or a library catalog), containing data elements required for its identification and retrieval, as well as additional supporting information, presented in a formalized bibliographic format. The additional information may support particular database functions such as search, or browse (e.g. keywords), or may serve fuller presentation of the content item in the database (e.g. article's abstract). Bibliographic records are usually retrievable from bibliographic databases by author, title, index term, or keyword. Bibliographic records can represent a wide variety of published contents, including traditional paper, digitized or born-digital publications. The process of creation, exchange, and preservation of bibliographic records are parts of a larger process, called bibliographic control. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Bibliographic record)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.9%.
15 23
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by Dr. Radut