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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 595 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articlessort icon Total usage Trending factor Charts

jena

Jena is an open source Semantic Web framework for Java. It provides an API to extract data from and write to RDF graphs. The graphs are represented as an abstract "model". A model can be sourced with data from files, databases, URLs or a combination of these. A Model can also be queried through SPARQL and updated through SPARUL. Jena is similar to Sesame; though, unlike Sesame, Jena provides support for OWL (Web Ontology Language). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Jena)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 12

mathml

Mathematical Markup Language (MathML) is an application of XML for describing mathematical notations and capturing both its structure and content. It aims at integrating mathematical formulae into World Wide Web pages and other documents. It is a recommendation of the W3C math working group. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: MathML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 9

microdata

Microdata is a WHATWG HTML5 specification used to nest semantics within existing content on web pages. Search engines, web crawlers, and browsers can extract and process Microdata from a web page and use it to provide a richer browsing experience for users. Microdata use a supporting vocabulary to describe an item and name-value pairs to assign values to its properties. Microdata helps technologies such as search engines and web crawlers better understand what information is contained in a web page, providing better search results. Microdata is an attempt to provide a simpler way of annotating HTML elements with machine readable tags than the similar approaches of using RDFa and Microformats. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Microdata)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 7

mobi

MOBI is the format used by the MobiPocket Reader. It may have a .mobi extension or it may have a .prc extension. The extension can be changed by the user to either of the accepted forms. In either case it may be DRM protected or non-DRM. The .prc extension is used because the PalmOS doesn't support any file extensions except .prc or .pdb. Note that Mobipocket prohibits their DRM format to be used on dedicated eBook readers that support other DRM formats. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 7

mooc

A massive open online course (MOOC) is an online course aimed at large-scale interactive participation and open access via the web. In addition to traditional course materials such as videos, readings, and problem sets, MOOCs provide interactive user forums that help build a community for the students, professors, and teaching assistants (TAs). MOOCs are a recent development in distance education. Features associated with early MOOCs, such as open licensing of content, open structure and learning goals, and connectivism may not be present in all MOOC projects, in particular with the 'openness' of many MOOCs being called into question. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: MOOC)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 19 1183.5

ogg

Ogg is a free, open standard container format maintained by the Xiph.Org Foundation. The creators of the Ogg format state that it is unrestricted by software patents and is designed to provide for efficient streaming and manipulation of high quality digital multimedia. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Ogg)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 9

pageflakes

Pageflakes is an Ajax-based startpage or personal web portal similar to Netvibes, My Yahoo!, iGoogle, Wikpage and Microsoft Live. The site is organized into tabs, each tab containing user-selected modules called Flakes. Each Flake varies in content; information such as RSS/Atom feeds, Calendar, Notes, Web search, weather forecast, del.icio.us bookmarks, Flickr photos, social networking tools like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, email and user-created modules. Pageflakes has 250,000 Flakes and over 130,000 Pagecasts (publicly shared pages created by users with individual URLs). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Pageflakes)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 8

samba

Samba is a free software re-implementation, originally developed by Australian Andrew Tridgell, of the SMB/CIFS networking protocol. As of version 3, Samba provides file and print services for various Microsoft Windows clients and can integrate with a Windows Server domain, either as a Primary Domain Controller (PDC) or as a domain member. It can also be part of an Active Directory domain. Samba runs on most Unix and Unix-like systems, such as GNU / Linux, Solaris, AIX and the BSD variants, including Apple's Mac OS X Server (which was added to the Mac OS X client in version 10.2). Samba is standard on nearly all distributions of Linux and is commonly included as a basic system service on other Unix-based operating systems as well. Samba is released under the GNU General Public License. The name Samba comes from SMB (Server Message Block), the name of the standard protocol used by the Microsoft Windows network file system. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Samba)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 6

saml

Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML) is an XML-based open standard for exchanging authentication and authorization data between security domains, that is, between an identity provider (a producer of assertions) and a service provider (a consumer of assertions). SAML is a product of the OASIS Security Services Technical Committee. The single most important problem that SAML is trying to solve is the Web Browser Single Sign-On (SSO) problem, a problem also addressed by the OpenID protocol. Single sign-on solutions are abundant at the intranet level (using cookies, for example) but extending these solutions beyond the intranet has been problematic and has led to the proliferation of non-interoperable proprietary technologies. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: SAML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 10

semiotic

Semiotics, also called semiotic studies or (in the Saussurean tradition) semiology, is the study of signs and sign processes (semiosis), indication, designation, likeness, analogy, metaphor, symbolism, signification, and communication. Semiotics is closely related to the field of linguistics, which, for its part, studies the structure and meaning of language more specifically. Semiotics is often divided into three branches: 1) Semantics: Relation between signs and the things to which they refer; their denotata, or meaning. 2) Syntactics: Relations among signs in formal structures. 3) Pragmatics: Relation between signs and the effects they have on the people who use them. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Semiotics)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 11

service oriented architecture

Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is a flexible set of design principles used during the phases of systems development and integration in computing. A system based on a SOA will package functionality as a suite of interoperable services that can be used within multiple, separate systems from several business domains. SOA also generally provides a way for consumers of services, such as web-based applications, to be aware of available SOA-based services. For example, several disparate departments within a company may develop and deploy SOA services in different implementation languages; their respective clients will benefit from a well understood, well defined interface to access them. XML is commonly used for interfacing with SOA services, though this is not required. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Service oriented architecture)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 9

sushi

The Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol standard (ANSI/NISO Z39.93-2007) defines an automated request and response model for the harvesting of electronic resource usage data utilizing a Web services framework. Built on SOAP, a versioned Web Services Description Language (WSDL), and XML schema with the syntax of the SUSHI protocol, this standard is intended to replace the time-consuming user-mediated collection of usage data reports. SUSHI was designed to be both generalised and extensible, so that it could be used to retrieve a variety of usage reports. An extension designed specifically to work with COUNTER reports is provided with the standard, as these are expected to be the most frequently retrieved usage reports. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 99 36.6

webinar

Web conferencing refers to a service that allows conferencing events to be shared with remote locations. Most vendors also provide either a recorded copy of an event, or a means for a subscriber to record an event. The service allows information to be shared simultaneously, across geographically dispersed locations in nearly real-time. Applications for web conferencing include meetings, training events, lectures, or short presentations from any computer. A participant can be either an individual person or a group. System requirements that allow individuals within a group to participate as individuals (e.g. when an audience participant asks a question) depend on the size of the group. Handling such requirements is often the responsibility of the group. In general, system requirements depend on the vendor. The service is made possible by Internet technologies, particularly on IP/TCP connections. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web conferencing)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 8

wordnet

WordNet is a lexical database for the English language. It groups English words into sets of synonyms called synsets, provides short, general definitions, and records the various semantic relations between these synonym sets. The purpose is twofold: to produce a combination of dictionary and thesaurus that is more intuitively usable, and to support automatic text analysis and artificial intelligence applications. The database and software tools have been released under a BSD style license and can be downloaded and used freely. The database can also be browsed online. WordNet was created and is being maintained at the Cognitive Science Laboratory of Princeton University under the direction of psychology professor George A. Miller. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Wordnet)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 8

adl

Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) is the product of the ADL Initiative, established in 1997 to standardize and modernize training and education management and delivery. The Department of Defense (DoD) Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness (OUSD P&R) oversees the ADL Initiative. The vision of the ADL Initiative is to provide access to the highest-quality learning and performance aiding that can be tailored to individual needs and delivered cost-effectively, at the right time and in the right place. The ADL Initiative developed SCORM and the ADL Registry. ADL uses structured and collaborative methods to convene multi-national groups from industry, academia, and government who develop the learning standards, tools, and content. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Advanced Distributed Learning)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 13

authority data

Functional Requirements for Authority Data (FRAD), formerly known as Functional Requirements for Authority Records (FRAR) is a conceptual entity-relationship model developed by the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) for relating the data that are recorded in library authority records to the needs of the users of those records and facilitate and sharing of that data. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: FRAD)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 8

bsd

Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD, sometimes called Berkeley Unix) is a UNIX operating system derivative developed and distributed by the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California, Berkeley, from 1977 to 1995. Historically, BSD has been considered a branch of UNIX - "BSD UNIX", because it shared the initial codebase and design with the original AT&T UNIX operating system. In the 1980s, BSD was widely adopted by vendors of workstation-class systems in the form of proprietary UNIX variants such as DEC ULTRIX and Sun Microsystems SunOS. This can be attributed to the ease with which it could be licensed, and the familiarity it found among the founders of many technology companies of this era. Though these proprietary BSD derivatives were largely superseded by the UNIX System V Release 4 and OSF/1 systems in the 1990s (both of which incorporated BSD code), later BSD releases provided a basis for several open source development projects that continue to this day. Today, the term "BSD" is often non-specifically used to refer to any of these BSD descendants, e.g., FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD or DragonFly, which together form a branch of the family of Unix-like operating systems. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: BSD)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 7

cerif

CERIF (Common European Research Information Format) emerged first as a simple standard not unlike a library catalogue card or the present DC (Dublin Core Metadata Standard) and was intended as a data exchange format. It was based on records describing projects, with persons and organisational units as attributes. However, it was soon realised that in practice this CERIF91 standard was inadequate: it was too rigid in format, did not handle repeating groups of information, was not multilingual / multi character set and did not represent in a sufficiently rich way the universe of interest. A new group of experts was convened and CERIF2000 was generated. Its essential features are: (a) it has the concept of objects or entities with attributes such as project, person, organisational unit; (b) it supports n:m relationships between them (and recursively on any of them) using 'linking relations' thus providing rich semantics including roles and time; (c) it is fully internationalised in language and character set; (d) it is extensible without prejudicing the core datamodel thus providing guaranteed interoperability at least at the core level but not precluding even richer intercommunication. It is designed for use both for data exchange (data file transfer) and for heterogeneous distributed query / result environments. With CERIF2004, minor improvements in consistency have been released. With CERIF2006 substantial improvements have been implemented with the model, concerning in particular the introduction of a so-called Semantic Layer, that makes the model flexible and scalable for application in very heterogeneous environments. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 133

character encoding

A character encoding system consists of a code that pairs each character from a given repertoire with something else, such as a sequence of natural numbers, octets or electrical pulses, in order to facilitate the transmission of data (generally numbers and / or text) through telecommunication networks or storage of text in computers. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Character encoding)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 11

cool uri

What makes a cool URI? A cool URI is one which does not change....Keeping URIs so that they will still be around in 2, 20 or 200 or even 2000 years is clearly not as simple as it sounds. However, all over the Web, webmasters are making decisions which will make it really difficult for themselves in the future. Often, this is because they are using tools whose task is seen as to present the best site in the moment, and no one has evaluated what will happen to the links when things change. The message here is, however, that many, many things can change and your URIs can and should stay the same. They only can if you think about how you design them. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 16
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