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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 595 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usagesort icon Trending factor Charts

ldap

The Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) is an application protocol for accessing and maintaining distributed directory information services over an Internet Protocol (IP) network. Directory services may provide any organized set of records, often with a hierarchical structure, such as a corporate email directory. LDAP is specified in a series of Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Standard Track Request for Comments (RFCs), using the description language ASN.1. An LDAP server may return referrals to other servers for requests that it cannot fulfill itself. This requires a naming structure for LDAP entries so one can find a server holding a given DN or distinguished name, a concept defined in the X.500 Directory and also used in LDAP. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: LDAP)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2%.
34 74 1.4

persistent identifier

An identifier is any label that allows us to find a resource. One of the best-known identifiers is the International Standard Book Number (ISBN), a unique ten-digit number assigned to books and other publications. On the Internet the most widely known identifier is the Uniform Resource Locator (URL), which allows users to find a resource by listing a protocol, domain name and, in many cases, file location. A persistent identifier is, as the name suggests, an identifier that exists for a very long time. It should at the very least be globally unique and be used as a reference to the resource beyond the resource's lifetime. URLs, although useful, are not very persistent. They only provide a link to the resource's location at the moment in time they are cited, if the resource moves they no longer apply. The issue of 'linkrot' on the Internet (broken links to resources), along with the need for further interoperability has led to the search for more persistent identifiers for digital resources. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.4%.
25 74 1.4

mashup

In Web development, a mashup is a Web page or application that uses and combines data, presentation or functionality from two or more sources to create new services. The term implies easy, fast integration, frequently using open APIs and data sources to produce enriched results that were not necessarily the original reason for producing the raw source data. The main characteristics of the mashup are combination, visualization, and aggregation. It is important to make existing data more useful, moreover for personal and professional use. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Mashup)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.4%.
24 79 11.4

oai-ore

Open Archives Initiative Object Reuse and Exchange (OAI-ORE) defines standards for the description and exchange of aggregations of Web resources. The OAI-ORE specification implements the ORE Model which introduces the Resource Map (ReM) that makes it possible to associate an identity with aggregations of resources and make assertions about their structure and semantics. These aggregations (sometimes called compound digital objects or compound information objects) may combine distributed resources together, and with multiple media types including text, images, data, and video. The goal of OAI-ORE is to expose the rich content in aggregations to applications that support authoring, deposit, exchange, visualization, reuse, and preservation. OAI-ORE is funded by the Mellon Foundation. Version 1.0 of the specification was released on 17 October 2008. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: OAI-ORE)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.8%.
14 80

wireless

In telecommunications, wireless communication may be used to transfer information over short distances (a few meters as in television remote control) or long distances (thousands or millions of kilometers for radio communications). The term is often shortened to "wireless". It encompasses various types of fixed, mobile, and portable two-way radios, cellular telephones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and wireless networking. Other examples of wireless technology include GPS units, garage door openers and or garage doors, wireless computer mice, keyboards and headsets, satellite television and cordless telephones. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Wireless)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.8%.
48 80 11.4

lcsh

The Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) comprise a thesaurus (in the information technology sense) of subject headings, maintained by the United States Library of Congress, for use in bibliographic records. LC Subject Headings are an integral part of bibliographic control, which is the function by which libraries collect, organize and disseminate documents. LCSHs are applied to every item within a library's collection, and facilitate a user's access to items in the catalogue that pertain to similar subject matter. If users could only locate items by 'title' or other descriptive fields, such as 'author' or 'publisher', they would have to expend an enormous amount of time searching for items of related subject matter, and undoubtedly miss locating many items because of the ineffective and inefficient search capability. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Library of Congress Subject Headings)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.6%.
27 81 1.2

mets

The Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) is a metadata standard for encoding descriptive, administrative, and structural metadata regarding objects within a digital library, expressed using the XML schema language of the World Wide Web Consortium. The standard is maintained in the Network Development and MARC Standards Office of the Library of Congress, and is being developed as an initiative of the Digital Library Federation. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS))

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.6%.
27 82 537.60

ascii

The American Standard Code for Information Interchange is a character-encoding scheme based on the ordering of the English alphabet. ASCII codes represent text in computers, communications equipment, and other devices that use text. Most modern character-encoding schemes are based on ASCII, though they support many more characters than did ASCII. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: ASCII)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.2%.
39 83

open data

Open data is a philosophy and practice requiring that certain data be freely available to everyone, without restrictions from copyright, patents or other mechanisms of control. It has a similar ethos to a number of other "Open" movements and communities such as open source and open access. However these are not logically linked and many combinations of practice are found. The practice and ideology itself is well established (for example in the Mertonian tradition of science) but the term "open data" itself is recent. Much of the emphasis in this entry is on data from scientific research and from the data-driven web. In some cases open data may be considered as more properly Open Metadata and there is not yet a consistent formalisation. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Open data)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.9%.
33 83 1156.2

drm

Digital rights management (DRM) is a term for access control technologies that are used by hardware manufacturers, publishers, copyright holders and individuals to limit the use of digital content and devices. The term is used to describe any technology that inhibits uses of digital content that is not desired or intended by the content provider. The term does not generally refer to other forms of copy protection, which can be circumvented without modifying the file or device, such as serial numbers or keyfiles. It can also refer to restrictions associated with specific instances of digital works or devices. Digital rights management is used by companies such as Sony, Amazon, Apple Inc., Microsoft, AOL and the BBC. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Digital rights management)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.2%.
21 84

google scholar

Google Scholar is a freely accessible web search engine that indexes the full text of scholarly literature across an array of publishing formats and disciplines. Released in beta in November 2004, the Google Scholar index includes most peer-reviewed online journals of Europe and America's largest scholarly publishers. It is similar in function to the freely-available Scirus from Elsevier, CiteSeerX, and getCITED. It is also similar to the subscription-based tools, Elsevier's Scopus and Thomson ISI's Web of Science. Its advertising slogan - "Stand on the shoulders of giants" - is a nod to the scholars who have contributed to their fields over the centuries, providing the foundation for new intellectual achievements. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Google Scholar)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.5%.
43 84

telnet

Telnet is a network protocol used on the Internet or local area networks to provide a bidirectional interactive text-oriented communications facility using a virtual terminal connection. User data is interspersed in-band with Telnet control information in an 8-bit byte oriented data connection over the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). Telnet was developed in 1969 beginning with RFC 15, extended in RFC 854, and standardized as Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Internet Standard STD 8, one of the first Internet standards. Historically, Telnet provided access to a command-line interface (usually, of an operating system) on a remote host. Most network equipment and operating systems with a TCP/IP stack support a Telnet service for remote configuration (including systems based on Windows NT). Because of security issues with Telnet, its use for this purpose has waned in favor of SSH. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Telnet)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.2%.
39 85

wcag

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) are part of a series of Web accessibility guidelines published by the W3C's Web Accessibility Initiative. They consist of a set of guidelines on making content accessible, primarily for disabled users, but also for all user agents, including highly limited devices, such as mobile phones. The current version is 2.0. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG))

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.9%.
16 85 141.90

cookie

A cookie, also known as an HTTP cookie, web cookie, or browser cookie, is used for an origin website to send state information to a user's browser and for the browser to return the state information to the origin site. The state information can be used for authentication, identification of a user session, user's preferences, shopping cart contents, or anything else that can be accomplished through storing text data on the user's computer. Cookies are not software. They cannot be programmed, cannot carry viruses, and cannot install malware on the host computer. However, they can be used by spyware to track user's browsing activities – a major privacy concern that prompted European and US law makers to take action. Cookies can also be stolen by hackers to gain access to a victim's web account. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: HTTP cookies)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.9%.
33 87 10.2

firefox

Mozilla Firefox is a free and open source web browser descended from the Mozilla Application Suite and managed by Mozilla Corporation. As of March 2011, Firefox is the second most widely used browser with approximately 30% of worldwide usage share of web browsers. The browser has had particular success in Germany and Poland, where it is the most popular browser with 60% usage and 47% respectively. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Firefox)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.8%.
32 87 1.1

openid

OpenID is an open standard that describes how users can be authenticated in a decentralized manner, obviating the need for services to provide their own ad hoc systems and allowing users to consolidate their digital identities. The OpenID protocol does not rely on a central authority to authenticate a user's identity. Moreover, neither services nor the OpenID standard may mandate a specific means by which to authenticate users, allowing for approaches ranging from the common (such as passwords) to the novel (such as smart cards or biometrics). The term OpenID may also refer to an ID as specified in the OpenID standard; these IDs take the form of a unique URL, and are managed by some 'OpenID provider' that handles authentication. OpenID authentication is now used and provided by several large websites. Providers include AOL, BBC, Google, IBM, MySpace, Orange, PayPal, VeriSign, LiveJournal, and Yahoo! (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: OpenID)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 87

vufind

VuFind is an open source library search engine that allows users to search and browse beyond the resources of a traditional OPAC. Developed by Villanova University, version 1.0 was released in July 2010 after two years in beta. VuFind operates with a simple, Google-like interface and offers flexible keyword searching. While most commonly used for searching catalog records, VuFind can be extended to search other library resources including but not limited to: locally cached journals, digital library items, and institutional repository and bibliography. The software is also modular and highly configurable, allowing implementers to choose system components to best fit their needs. As of March 2012, a total of 64 institutions are running live instances of Vufind including the Georgia Tech Library, the London School of Economics, the National Library of Ireland, Yale University, and the DC Public Library. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VuFind)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 87

xslt

XSLT (Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations) is a declarative, XML-based language used for the transformation of XML documents. The original document is not changed; rather, a new document is created based on the content of an existing one. The new document may be serialized (output) by the processor in standard XML syntax or in another format, such as HTML or plain text. XSLT is most often used to convert data between different XML schemas or to convert XML data into web pages or PDF documents. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: XSLT)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.7%.
30 88

dtd

Document Type Definition (DTD) is a set of markup declarations that define a document type for SGML-family markup languages (SGML, XML, HTML). DTDs were a precursor to XML schema and have a similar function, although different capabilities. DTDs use a terse formal syntax that declares precisely which elements and references may appear where in the document of the particular type, and what the elements' contents and attributes are. DTDs also declare entities which may be used in the instance document. XML uses a subset of SGML DTD. As of 2009 newer XML Namespace-aware schema languages (such as W3C XML Schema and ISO RELAX NG) have largely superseded DTDs. A namespace-aware version of DTDs is being developed as Part 9 of ISO DSDL. DTDs persist in applications which need special publishing characters such as the XML and HTML Character Entity References, which were derived from the larger sets defined as part of the ISO SGML standard effort. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: DTD)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.1%.
36 91

web app

A web application is an application that is accessed by users over a network such as the Internet or an intranet. The term may also mean a computer software application that is coded in a browser-supported programming language (such as JavaScript, combined with a browser-rendered markup language like HTML) and reliant on a common web browser to render the application executable. Web applications are popular due to the ubiquity of web browsers, and the convenience of using a web browser as a client, sometimes called a thin client. The ability to update and maintain web applications without distributing and installing software on potentially thousands of client computers is a key reason for their popularity, as is the inherent support for cross-platform compatibility. Common web applications include webmail, online retail sales, online auctions, wikis and many other functions. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web application)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.6%.
45 96 817.60
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