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This page provides an overview of 595 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factor Charts

openoffice

OpenOffice.org, commonly known as OOo or OpenOffice, is an open-source application suite whose main components are for word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, graphics, and databases. It is available for a number of different computer operating systems, is distributed as free software and is written using its own GUI toolkit. It supports the ISO/IEC standard OpenDocument Format (ODF) for data interchange as its default file format, as well as Microsoft Office formats among others. As of November 2009, OpenOffice.org supports over 110 languages. As free software, users are free to download, modify, use and distribute OpenOffice.org. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: OpenOffice)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 12

openurl

OpenURL is a standardized format (Z39.88) of Uniform Resource Locator (URL) intended to enable Internet users to more easily find a copy of a resource that they are allowed to access. Although OpenURL can be used with any kind of resource on the Internet, it is most heavily used by libraries to help connect patrons to subscription content. The OpenURL standard is designed to enable linking from information resources such as abstracting and indexing databases (sources) to library services (targets), such as academic journals, whether online or in printed or other formats. The linking is mediated by "link resolvers", or "link-servers", which parse the elements of an OpenURL and provide links to appropriate targets available through a library by the use of an OpenURL knowledge base. The source that generates an OpenURL is typically a bibliographic citation or bibliographic record in a database that indexes the information resources often found in libraries, such as articles, books, patents, etc. Examples of such databases include Ovid, Web of Science, SciFinder, Modern Languages Association Bibliography and Google Scholar. A target is a resource or service that helps satisfy a user's information needs. Examples of targets include full-text repositories, online journals, online library catalogs and other Web resources and services. The National Information Standards Organization (NISO) has developed OpenURL and its data container (the ContextObject) as American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard Z39.88. On 22 June 2006, the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was named the maintenance agency for the standard. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: OpenUrl)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.1%.
54 549

opera

Opera is a web browser and Internet suite developed by Opera Software. The browser handles common Internet-related tasks such as displaying web sites, sending and receiving e-mail messages, managing contacts, chatting on IRC, downloading files via BitTorrent, and reading web feeds. Opera is offered free of charge for personal computers and mobile phones. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Opera web browser)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.7%.
13 24

opm

The Open Provenance Model OPM is the result of the Provenance Challenge series that was initiated in May 2006, at the first IPAW workshop. OPM was originally crafted in a meeting held in Salt Lake City in August 2007. OPM v1.00 was released to the community in December 2007. The first OPM workshop in June 2008 involved some twenty participants discussing issues related to this specification, and led to a revised specification, referred to as OPM v1.01. From the outset, the original authors' intent has been to define a data model that is open from an inter-operability viewpoint but also with respect to the community of its contributors, reviewers and users. To ensure that these principles are adhered to, an "open source like" governance model for OPM was adopted in June 2009, which led to the development of OPM v1.1, the most recent version of the model, which went under a public revision process (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

opml

OPML (Outline Processor Markup Language) is an XML format for outlines (defined as "a tree, where each node contains a set of named attributes with string values"). Originally developed by Radio UserLand as a native file format for an outliner application, it has since been adopted for other uses, the most common being to exchange lists of web feeds between web feed aggregators. The OPML specification defines an outline as a hierarchical, ordered list of arbitrary elements. The specification is fairly open which makes it suitable for many types of list data. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: OPML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 4

osid

Open Service Interface Definitions (OSIDs) are programmatic interface specifications describing services. These interfaces are specified by the Open Knowledge Initiative (O.K.I.) to implement a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) to achieve interoperability among applications across a varied base of underlying and changing technologies. To preserve the investment in development, program logic is separated from underlying technologies through the use of software interfaces each of which defines a contract between a service consumer and a service provider. This separation is the basis of any valid SOA. While some methods define the service interface boundary at a protocol or server level, OSIDs place the boundary at the application level to effectively insulate the consumer from protocols, server identities, and utility libraries that are in the domain to a service provider resulting in software which is easier to develop, longer lasting, and usable across a wider array of computing environments. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Open Service Interface Definitions (OSIDs))

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

p/meta

The PMC Project P/Meta has this goal: the exchange of media items or objects between process stages and business entities would benefit significantly from a standard approach to structuring related information, either associated with the media in a separate data repository or embedded (wrapped) with it as electronic metadata. Seminal work is already being carried out by SMPTE on defining the Dynamic Metadata Dictionary, UMIDs, mapping of metadata into transports, and preparation of operational guidelines and engineering recommendations. Complementary work is proposed for the EBU to consider the adoption of a common exchange framework and format between members (and wider) which builds on SMPTE outputs and the additional insights provided by the BBC's Standard Media Exchange Framework. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

pageflakes

Pageflakes is an Ajax-based startpage or personal web portal similar to Netvibes, My Yahoo!, iGoogle, Wikpage and Microsoft Live. The site is organized into tabs, each tab containing user-selected modules called Flakes. Each Flake varies in content; information such as RSS/Atom feeds, Calendar, Notes, Web search, weather forecast, del.icio.us bookmarks, Flickr photos, social networking tools like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, email and user-created modules. Pageflakes has 250,000 Flakes and over 130,000 Pagecasts (publicly shared pages created by users with individual URLs). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Pageflakes)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 8

pdi

The Versit Consortium was a multivendor initiative founded by Apple Computer, AT&T, IBM and Siemens in the early 1990s in order to create Personal Data Interchange (PDI) technology, open specifications for exchanging personal data over the Internet, wired and wireless connectivity and Computer Telephony Integration (CTI). The Consortium started a number of projects to deliver open specifications aimed at creating industry standards. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Personal data interchange)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 5

photoshop

Adobe Photoshop is a graphics editing program developed and published by Adobe Systems Incorporated. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Adobe Photoshop)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.3%.
22 37

pics

The Platform for Internet Content Selection (PICS) is a specification created by W3C that uses metadata to label webpages to help parents and teachers control what children and students can access on the Internet. The W3C Protocol for Web Description Resources project integrates PICS concepts with RDF. PICS has been superseded by POWDER. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Platform for Internet Content Selection)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.1%.
19 73

plone

Plone is a free and open source content management system built on top of the Zope application server. In principle, Plone can be used for any kind of website, including blogs, internet sites, webshops and internal websites. It is also well positioned to be used as a document publishing system and groupware collaboration tool. The strengths of Plone are its flexible and adaptable workflow, very good security, extensibility, high usability and flexibility. Plone is released under the GNU General Public License (GPL) and is designed to be extensible. Major development is conducted periodically during special meetings called Plone Sprints. Additional functionality is added to Plone with Products, which may be distributed through the Plone website or otherwise. The Plone Foundation holds and enforces all copyrights and trademarks. Plone also has legal backing from the council of the Software Freedom Law Center. MediaWiki's "Monobook" layout is based partially on the Plone style sheets. High-profile public sector users include the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Brazilian Government, United Nations, City of Bern (Switzerland), New South Wales Government (Australia), and European Environment Agency. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Plone)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 17

png

Portable Network Graphics is a bitmapped image format and video codec that employs lossless data compression. PNG was created to improve upon and replace GIF (Graphics Interchange Format) as an image-file format not requiring a patent license. The PNG acronym is optionally recursive, unofficially standing for PNG's Not GIF. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: PNG)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.9%.
15 32

pode

The Pode-project looks at new ways of using metadata found in library catalogues, in particular ways of mashing the catalogue content with other 'mashable' resources. In addition, the project looks into the possibilities and challenges the web technologies provide in relation to today's systems and practices. This project uses traditional protocols provided by the ILS vendors as well as converting and finetuning data for frbrization and provision of Linked library data. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 5

prince2

PRINCE2 (PRojects IN Controlled Environments) is a process-based method for effective project management. PRINCE2 is a de facto standard used extensively by the UK Government and is widely recognised and used in the private sector, both in the UK and internationally. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 6

programmable web

ProgrammableWeb is a website featuring the latest on what's new and interesting with mashups, Web 2.0 APIs, and the Web as Platform. It's a directory, a news source, a reference guide, a community. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 2

programming language

Computer programming (often shortened to programming or coding) is the process of designing, writing, testing, debugging / troubleshooting, and maintaining the source code of computer programs. This source code is written in a programming language. The purpose of programming is to create a program that exhibits a certain desired behavior. The process of writing source code often requires expertise in many different subjects, including knowledge of the application domain, specialized algorithms and formal logic. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Computer programming)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.4%.
25 35

provenance

Provenance, from the French provenir, "to come from", means the origin, or the source of something, or the history of the ownership or location of an object. The term was originally mostly used for works of art, but is now used in similar senses in a wide range of fields, including science and computing. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Provenance)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 4.4%.
76 138

python

Python is an interpreted, general-purpose high-level programming language whose design philosophy emphasizes code readability. Python aims to combine "remarkable power with very clear syntax", and its standard library is large and comprehensive. Its use of indentation for block delimiters is unique among popular programming languages. Python supports multiple programming paradigms, primarily but not limited to object-oriented, imperative and, to a lesser extent, functional programming styles. It features a fully dynamic type system and automatic memory management, similar to that of Scheme, Ruby, Perl, and Tcl. Like other dynamic languages, Python is often used as a scripting language, but is also used in a wide range of non-scripting contexts. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Python)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.1%.
20 38

qr code

A QR code (abbreviated from Quick Response code) is a type of matrix barcode (or two-dimensional code) designed to be read by smartphones. The code consists of black modules arranged in a square pattern on a white background. The information encoded may be text, a URL, or other data. Created by Toyota subsidiary Denso Wave in 1994, the QR code is one of the most popular types of two-dimensional barcodes. The QR code was designed to allow its contents to be decoded at high speed. The technology has seen frequent use in Japan and South Korea; the United Kingdom is the seventh-largest national consumer of QR codes. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: QR code)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 20
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