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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 596 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articlessort icon Total usage Trending factor Charts

content syndication

Web syndication is a form of syndication in which website material is made available to multiple other sites. Most commonly, web syndication refers to making web feeds available from a site in order to provide other people with a summary or update of the website's recently added content (for example, the latest news or forum posts). The term can also be used to describe other kinds of licensing website content so that other websites can use it. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Content syndication)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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cordra

The Advanced Distributed Learning Registry was developed by the ADL Initiative and is the central search point for the discovery of digital objects related to DoD training, education, performance, and decision-aiding that can be redeployed, rearranged, repurposed, and rewritten. In much the same way that a card from the card catalog contains descriptive information about books in a library, the ADL Registry contains all of the registered entries that contain metadata about the digital object in a repository. "It is the first instance of a registry-based approach to repository federation resulting from the Content Object Repository Discovery and Registration/Resolution Architecture (CORDRA) project. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Content Object Repository Discovery and Registration/Resolution Architecture)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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cql

Contextual Query Language (CQL), previously known as Common Query Language, is a formal language for representing queries to information retrieval systems such as search engines, bibliographic catalogs and museum collection information. Based on the semantics of Z39.50, its design objective is that queries be human readable and writable, and that the language be intuitive while maintaining the expressiveness of more complex query languages. It is being developed and maintained by the Z39.50 Maintenance Agency, part of the Library of Congress. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Contextual Query Language)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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data compression

In computer science and information theory, data compression, source coding or bit-rate reduction is the process of encoding information using fewer bits than the original representation would use. Compression is useful because it helps reduce the consumption of expensive resources, such as hard disk space or transmission bandwidth. On the downside, compressed data must be decompressed to be used, and this extra processing may be detrimental to some applications. For instance, a compression scheme for video may require expensive hardware for the video to be decompressed fast enough to be viewed as it is being decompressed (the option of decompressing the video in full before watching it may be inconvenient, and requires storage space for the decompressed video). The design of data compression schemes therefore involves trade-offs among various factors, including the degree of compression, the amount of distortion introduced (if using a lossy compression scheme), and the computational resources required to compress and uncompress the data. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Data compression)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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edrms

Electronic Document and Records Management System (EDRMS) is a type of content management system and refers to the combined technologies of document management and records management systems as an integrated system. Electronic document and records management aims to enable organizations to manage documents and records throughout the document life-cycle, from creation to destruction. Typically, systems consider a document a work in progress until it has undergone review, approval, lock-down and (potentially) publication, at which point it becomes a formal record within the organization. Once a document achieves the status of a record, the organization may apply best-practice or legally enforced retention policies which state how the second half of the record life-cycle will progress. This typically involves retention (and protection from change), until some events occur which relate to the record and which trigger the final disposition schedule to apply to the record. Eventually, typically at a set time after these events, the record undergoes destruction. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: EDRMS)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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educational data mining

Educational Data Mining (EDM) describes a research field concerned with the application of data mining to information generated from educational settings (e.g., universities and intelligent tutoring systems). At a high level, the field seeks to develop methods for exploring this data, which often has multiple levels of meaningful hierarchy, in order to discover new insights about how people learn in the context of such settings. A key area of EDM is mining computer logs of student performance. Another key area is mining enrollment data. Key uses of EDM include predicting student performance, and studying learning in order to recommend improvements to current educational practice. EDM can be considered one of the learning sciences, as well as an area of data mining. A related field is learning analytics. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Educational Data Mining)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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flac

Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC) is an audio compression codec primarily authored by Josh Coalson. FLAC employs a lossless data compression algorithm. A digital audio recording compressed by FLAC can be decompressed into an identical copy of the original audio data. Audio sources encoded to FLAC are typically reduced to 50-60% of their original size. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: FLAC)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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frad

Functional Requirements for Authority Data (FRAD), formerly known as Functional Requirements for Authority Records (FRAR) is a conceptual entity-relationship model developed by the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) for relating the data that are recorded in library authority records to the needs of the users of those records and facilitate and sharing of that data. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: FRAD)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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freemium

Freemium is a business model by which a proprietary product or service (typically a digital offering such as software, media, games or web services) is provided free of charge, but money (premium) is charged for advanced features, functionality, or virtual goods. The word "freemium" is a portmanteau neologism combining the two aspects of the business model: "free" and "premium". (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Freemium)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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genetic algorithm

A genetic algorithm (GA) is a search heuristic that mimics the process of natural evolution. This heuristic is routinely used to generate useful solutions to optimization and search problems. Genetic algorithms belong to the larger class of evolutionary algorithms (EA), which generate solutions to optimization problems using techniques inspired by natural evolution, such as inheritance, mutation, selection, and crossover. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Genetic algorithm)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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git

Git is a distributed revision control system with an emphasis on speed. Git was initially designed and developed by Linus Torvalds for Linux kernel development. Every Git working directory is a full-fledged repository with complete history and full revision tracking capabilities, not dependent on network access or a central server. Git's current software maintenance is overseen by Junio Hamano. Git is free software distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Git)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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gnome

GNOME is a desktop environment / graphical user interface that runs on top of a computer operating system. It is composed entirely of free and open source software and was created by two Mexican programmers, Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena. It is an international project that includes creating software development frameworks, selecting application software for the desktop, and working on the programs that manage application launching, file handling, and window and task management. GNOME is part of the GNU Project and can be used with various Unix-like operating systems, most notably Linux and as part of the Java Desktop System in Solaris. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Gnome)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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google trends

Google Trends is a public web facility of Google Inc., based on Google Search, that shows how often a particular search-term is entered relative to the total search-volume across various regions of the world, and in various languages. The horizontal axis of the main graph represents time (starting from some time in 2004), and the vertical is how often a term is searched for relative to the total number of searches, globally. Below the main graph, popularity is broken down by region, city and language. It is possible to refine the main graph by region and time period. On August 5, 2008, Google launched Google Insights for Search, a more sophisticated and advanced service displaying search trends data. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Google Trends)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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google wave

Apache Wave is a software framework centered on online real-time collaborative editing, originally developed by Google as Google Wave. It was first announced at the Google I/O conference on May 27, 2009. Google Wave is a web-based computing platform and communications protocol, designed to merge key features of media like e-mail, instant messaging, wikis, and social networking. Communications using the system can be synchronous and/or asynchronous, depending on the preference of individual users. Software extensions provide contextual spelling/grammar checking, automated translation among 40 languages, and numerous other features. On August 4, 2010, Google announced the suspension of stand-alone Wave development and the intent of maintaining the web site at least for the remainder of the year. Development was handed over to the Apache Software Foundation which started to develop a server based product called Wave in a box (WIAB). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Aoache Wave)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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hcard

hCard is a microformat for publishing the contact details (which might be no more than the name) of people, companies, organizations, and places, in (X)HTML, Atom, RSS, or arbitrary XML. The hCard microformat does this using a 1:1 representation of vCard (RFC 2426) properties and values, identified using HTML classes and rel attributes. It allows parsing tools (for example other websites, or Firefox's Operator extension) to extract the details, and display them, using some other websites or mapping tools, index or search them, or to load them into an address-book program. In May 2009, Google announced that they would be parsing the hCard, hReview and hProduct microformats, and using them to populate search-result pages. In September 2010 Google announced their intention to surface hCard, hReview information in their local search results. In February 2011, Facebook began using hCard to mark up event venues. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: hCard)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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heritrix

Heritrix is the Internet Archive's web crawler, which was specially designed for web archiving. It is open-source and written in Java. The main interface is accessible using a web browser, and there is a command-line tool that can optionally be used to initiate crawls. Heritrix was developed jointly by Internet Archive and the Nordic national libraries on specifications written in early 2003. The first official release was in January 2004, and it has been continually improved by employees of the Internet Archive and other interested parties. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Heritrix)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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infrastructure as a service

Cloud infrastructure services, also known as "infrastructure as a service" (IaaS), deliver computer infrastructure – typically a platform virtualisation environment – as a service, along with raw (block) storage and networking. Rather than purchasing servers, software, data-center space or network equipment, clients instead buy those resources as a fully outsourced service. Suppliers typically bill such services on a utility computing basis; the amount of resources consumed (and therefore the cost) will typically reflect the level of activity. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Infrastructure as a service)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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j2ee

Java Platform, Enterprise Edition or Java EE is a widely used platform for server programming in the Java programming language. The Java platform (Enterprise Edition) differs from the Java Standard Edition Platform (Java SE) in that it adds libraries which provide functionality to deploy fault-tolerant, distributed, multi-tier Java software, based largely on modular components running on an application server. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Java Platform, Enterprise Edition)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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jabber

Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) is an open-standard communications protocol for message-oriented middleware based on XML (Extensible Markup Language). The protocol was originally named Jabber, and was developed by the Jabber open-source community in 1999 for, originally, near-real-time, extensible instant messaging (IM), presence information, and contact list maintenance. Designed to be extensible, the protocol today also finds application in VoIP and file transfer signaling. Unlike most instant messaging protocols, XMPP uses an open systems approach of development and application, by which anyone may implement an XMPP service and interoperate with other organizations' implementations. The software implementation and many client applications are distributed as free and open source software. XMPP-based software is deployed widely across the Internet and by 2003 was used by over ten million people worldwide, according to the XMPP Standards Foundation. Apache Wave's federation protocol is an extension to the XMPP protocol. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Jabber)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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jacs

The Joint Academic Classification of Subjects (JACS) system is used by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) in the United Kingdom to classify academic subjects, especially for undergraduate degrees. A JACS code for a single subject consists of a letter and three numbers. The letter represents the broad subject classification and subsequent numbers represent further details, similar to the Dewey Decimal System. For example, F represents the Physical Sciences, F300 Physics, F330 Environmental Physics and F331 Atmospheric Physics. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Joint Academic Classification of Subjects (JACS))

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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by Dr. Radut