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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 596 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factor Charts

web services

A web service is a method of communication between two electronic devices over a network. The W3C defines a "web service" as "a software system designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network. It has an interface described in a machine-processable format (specifically Web Services Description Language WSDL). Other systems interact with the web service in a manner prescribed by its description using SOAP messages, typically conveyed using HTTP with an XML serialization in conjunction with other Web-related standards." The W3C also states, "We can identify two major classes of web services, REST-compliant Web services, in which the primary purpose of the service is to manipulate XML representations of Web resources using a uniform set of "stateless" operations; and arbitrary Web services, in which the service may expose an arbitrary set of operations. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web service)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 11.4%.
199 659 0.2

bibliographic data

A bibliographic database is a database of bibliographic records, an organized digital collection of references to published literature, including journal and newspaper articles, conference proceedings, reports, government and legal publications, patents, books, etc. In contrast to library catalogue entries, a large proportion of the bibliographic records in bibliographic databases describe analytics (articles, conference papers, etc.) rather than complete monographs, and they generally contain very rich subject descriptions in the form of keywords, subject classification terms, or abstracts. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Bibliographic data)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 20%.
348 728 0.1

html

HTML, which stands for HyperText Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. HTML is written in the form of HTML elements consisting of tags, enclosed in angle brackets. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: HTML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 20.1%.
350 1610 0.1

interoperability

Interoperability is a property referring to the ability of diverse systems and organizations to work together (inter-operate). The term is often used in a technical systems engineering sense, or alternatively in a broad sense, taking into account social, political, and organizational factors that impact system to system performance.The IEEE Glossary defines interoperability as: the ability of two or more systems or components to exchange information and to use the information that has been exchanged. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Interoperability)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 20.2%.
352 981 0.1

web 2.0

The term Web 2.0 is associated with web applications that facilitate participatory information sharing, interoperability, user-centered design, and collaboration on the World Wide Web. A Web 2.0 site allows users to interact and collaborate with each other in a social media dialogue as creators (prosumers) of user-generated content in a virtual community, in contrast to websites where users (consumers) are limited to the passive viewing of content that was created for them. Examples of Web 2.0 include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, video sharing sites, hosted services, web applications, mashups and folksonomies. The term is closely associated with Tim O'Reilly because of the O'Reilly Media Web 2.0 conference in late 2004. Although the term suggests a new version of the World Wide Web, it does not refer to an update to any technical specification, but rather to cumulative changes in the ways software developers and end-users use the Web. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web 2.0)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 9.3%.
163 740 0.1

aac

Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) is a standardized, lossy compression and encoding scheme for digital audio. Designed to be the successor of the MP3 format, AAC generally achieves better sound quality than MP3 at similar bit rates. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: AAC)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 2

aacr2

AACR2 stands for the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, Second Edition. It is published jointly by the American Library Association, the Canadian Library Association, and the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in the UK. The editor is Michael Gorman, a British-born librarian living in the Chicago area and honored by both the ALA and CILIP. AACR2 is designed for use in the construction of catalogues and other lists in general libraries of all sizes. The rules cover the description of, and the provision of access points for, all library materials commonly collected at the present time. Despite the claim to be 'Anglo-American', the first edition of AACR was published in 1967 in somewhat distinct North American and British texts. The second edition of 1978 unified the two sets of rules (adopting the British spelling 'cataloguing') and brought them in line with the International Standard Bibliographic Description. Libraries wishing to migrate from the previous North American text were obliged to implement 'desuperimposition', a substantial change in the form of headings for corporate bodies. As well as occasional minor amendments, a broader revision was completed in July 2010 in which the rules are more consistent and coherent, informed by the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records. This new cataloging code has been released as Resource Description and Access and is currently undergoing testing at a number of universities as well as the Library of Congress. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.1%.
20 56

accessibility

Accessibility is a general term used to describe the degree to which a product, device, service, or environment is available to as many people as possible. Accessibility can be viewed as the "ability to access" and possible benefit of some system or entity. Accessibility is often used to focus on people with disabilities or special needs and their right of access to entities, often through use of assistive technology. Accessibility is often abbreviated to the numeronym a11y, where the number 11 refers to the number of letters omitted. This parallels the abbreviations of internationalization and localization as i18n and l10n respectively. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Accessibility)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 13.2%.
231 945

adl

Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL) is the product of the ADL Initiative, established in 1997 to standardize and modernize training and education management and delivery. The Department of Defense (DoD) Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness (OUSD P&R) oversees the ADL Initiative. The vision of the ADL Initiative is to provide access to the highest-quality learning and performance aiding that can be tailored to individual needs and delivered cost-effectively, at the right time and in the right place. The ADL Initiative developed SCORM and the ADL Registry. ADL uses structured and collaborative methods to convene multi-national groups from industry, academia, and government who develop the learning standards, tools, and content. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Advanced Distributed Learning)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 13

agile development

Agile software development is a group of software development methodologies based on iterative and incremental development, where requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between self-organizing, cross-functional teams. The Agile Manifesto introduced the term in 2001. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Agile development)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 8

aiff

Audio Interchange File Format (AIFF) is an audio file format standard used for storing sound data for personal computers and other electronic audio devices. The format was co-developed by Apple Computer in 1988 based on Electronic Arts' Interchange File Format (IFF, widely used on Amiga systems) and is most commonly used on Apple Macintosh computer systems. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: AIFF)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 2

algorithm

In mathematics and computer science, an algorithm is an effective method expressed as a finite list of well-defined instructions for calculating a function. Algorithms are used for calculation, data processing, and automated reasoning. In simple words an algorithm is a step-by-step procedure for calculations. Starting from an initial state and initial input (perhaps empty), the instructions describe a computation that, when executed, will proceed through a finite number of well-defined successive states, eventually producing "output" and terminating at a final ending state. The transition from one state to the next is not necessarily deterministic; some algorithms, known as randomized algorithms, incorporate random input. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Algotithm)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 5.4%.
94 168

amazon web services

Amazon Web Services (abbreviated AWS) is a collection of remote computing services (also called web services) that together make up a cloud computing platform, offered over the Internet by Amazon.com. The most central and well-known of these services are Amazon EC2 and Amazon S3. Launched in July 2002, Amazon Web Services provide online services for other web sites or client-side applications. Most of these services are not exposed directly to end users, but instead offer functionality that other developers can use in their applications. Amazon Web Services’ offerings are accessed over HTTP, using REST and SOAP protocols. All services are billed based on usage, but how usage is measured for billing varies from service to service. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Amazon Web Services)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 7

amplified event

An amplified event exploits various technologies to extend the reach of an event. This can include: enhancing discussions at the event through use of technologies such as Twitter; enhancing access to talks to remote audiences through video or audio streaming; 'time-shifting' access to resources. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

apache

The Apache HTTP Server, commonly referred to as Apache, is web server software notable for playing a key role in the initial growth of the World Wide Web. In 2009 it became the first web server software to surpass the 100 million website milestone. Apache was the first viable alternative to the Netscape Communications Corporation web server (currently known as Oracle iPlanet Web Server), and has since evolved to rival other web servers in terms of functionality and performance. Typically Apache is run on a Unix-like operating system. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Apache HTTP Server)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 4.5%.
79 491

apache license

The Apache License is a copyfree free software license authored by the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). The Apache License requires preservation of the copyright notice and disclaimer. All software produced by the ASF or any of its projects or subjects is licensed according to the terms of the Apache License. Some non-ASF software is also licensed using the Apache License. As of November 2010, over 6000 projects located at SourceForge.net were available under the terms of the Apache License. In a blog post from May 2008 Google mentioned that 25,000 out of the 100,000 projects then hosted on Google Code were using the Apache License. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Apache licenses)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 1

application profile

In computer science, an application profile is a set of metadata elements, policies, and guidelines defined for a particular application. The elements may be from one or more element sets, thus allowing a given application to meet its functional requirements by using metadata from several element sets including locally defined sets. For example, a given application might choose a subset of the Dublin Core that meets its needs, or may include elements from the Dublin Core, another element set, and several locally defined elements, all combined in a single schema. An application profile is not complete without documentation that defines the policies and best practices appropriate to the application. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Application profile)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.1%.
54 478

archimate

ArchiMate is an open and independent enterprise architecture modelling language to support the description, analysis and visualization of architecture within and across business domains in an unambiguous way. ArchiMate is a technical standard from the Open Group and is based on the concepts of the IEEE 1471 standard. It is supported by various tool vendors and consulting firms. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: ArchiMate)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

ark

Archival Resource Key (ARK) is a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) that provides a multi-purpose identifier given to information objects of any type. ARKs contain the label ark: in the URL, which sets the expectation that the URL terminated by '?' returns a brief metadata record, and the URL terminated by '??' returns metadata that includes a commitment statement from the current service provider. While ARKs have application in identifier persistence, the ARK scheme sees persistence as purely a matter of service and not a property of a naming syntax. The ARK inflections '?' and '??' are designed to permit service providers to convey to users some sense of their ability to provide persistence. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: ARK)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 45

ascii

The American Standard Code for Information Interchange is a character-encoding scheme based on the ordering of the English alphabet. ASCII codes represent text in computers, communications equipment, and other devices that use text. Most modern character-encoding schemes are based on ASCII, though they support many more characters than did ASCII. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: ASCII)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.2%.
39 83
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by Dr. Radut