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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 596 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factorsort icon Charts

gopher

The Gopher protocol is a TCP/IP application layer protocol designed for distributing, searching, and retrieving documents over the Internet. Strongly oriented towards a menu-document design, the Gopher protocol was a predecessor of (and later, an alternative to) the World Wide Web. The protocol offers some features not natively supported by the Web and imposes a much stronger hierarchy on information stored on it. Its text menu interface is well-suited to computing environments that rely heavily on remote text-oriented computer terminals, which were still common at the time of its creation in 1991, and the simplicity of its protocol facilitated a wide variety of client implementations. Although largely supplanted by the Web in the years following, the Gopher protocol is still in use by enthusiasts, and a small population of actively-maintained servers remains. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Gopher protocol)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3%.
53 119

gotomeeting

GoToMeeting is a Web-hosted service created and marketed by Citrix Online, a division of Citrix Systems. It is a remote meeting and desktop sharing software that enables the user to meet with other computer users, customers, clients or colleagues via the Internet in real-time. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: GoToMeeting)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 2

gpl

The GNU General Public License (GNU GPL or simply GPL) is the most widely used free software license, originally written by Richard Stallman for the GNU project. The GPL is the first copyleft license for general use, which means that derived works can only be distributed under the same license terms. Under this philosophy, the GPL grants the recipients of a computer program the rights of the free software definition and uses copyleft to ensure the freedoms are preserved, even when the work is changed or added to. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD licenses are the standard examples. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: GPL)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
8 19

graphics

Graphics are visual presentations on some surface, such as a wall, canvas, computer screen, paper, or stone to brand, inform, illustrate, or entertain. Examples are photographs, drawings, Line Art, graphs, diagrams, typography, numbers, symbols, geometric designs, maps, engineering drawings, or other images. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Graphics)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 10.5%.
183 301

groovy

Groovy is an object-oriented programming language for the Java platform. It is a dynamic language with features similar to those of Python, Ruby, Perl, and Smalltalk. It can be used as a scripting language for the Java Platform. Groovy uses a Java-like bracket syntax. It is dynamically compiled to Java Virtual Machine (JVM) bytecode and interoperates with other Java code and libraries. Most Java code is also syntactically valid Groovy. Groovy 1.0 was released on January 2, 2007. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Groovy programming language)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 4

guid

A globally unique identifier or GUID is a unique reference number used as an identifier in computer software. The term GUID also is used for Microsoft's implementation of the Universally Unique Identifier (UUID) standard. The value of a GUID is often represented as a 32-character hexadecimal string, such as {21EC2020-3AEA-1069-A2DD-08002B30309D}, and is usually stored as a 128-bit integer. The total number of unique keys is 2128 or 3.4×1038 - roughly 2 trillion per cubic millimeter of the entire volume of the Earth. This number is so large that the probability of the same number being generated randomly twice is extremely small. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: GUID)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 3

h.263

H.263 is a video compression standard originally designed as a low-bitrate compressed format for videoconferencing. It was developed by the ITU-T Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) in a project ending in 1995/1996 as one member of the H.26x family of video coding standards in the domain of the ITU-T. H.263 has since found many applications on the internet: much Flash Video content (as used on sites such as YouTube, Google Video, MySpace, etc.) used to be encoded in Sorenson Spark format (an incomplete implementation of H.263), though many sites now use VP6 or H.264 encoding. The original version of the RealVideo codec was based on H.263 up until the release of RealVideo 8. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: H.263)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

h.264

H.264 / MPEG-4 Part 10 or AVC (Advanced Video Coding) is a standard for video compression, and is currently one of the most commonly used formats for the recording, compression, and distribution of high definition video. The final drafting work on the first version of the standard was completed in May 2003. H.264 is perhaps best known as being one of the codec standards for Blu-ray Discs; all Blu-ray players must be able to decode H.264. It is also widely used by streaming internet sources, such as videos from Vimeo, YouTube, and the iTunes Store, web software such as the Adobe Flash Player and Microsoft Silverlight, broadcast services for DVB and SBTVD, direct-broadcast satellite television services, cable television services, and real-time videoconferencing. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: H.264)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 3

hadoop

Apache Hadoop is an open source software framework that supports data-intensive distributed applications licensed under the Apache v2 license. It enables applications to work with thousands of computational independent computers and petabytes of data. Hadoop was derived from Google's MapReduce and Google File System (GFS) papers. Hadoop is a top-level Apache project being built and used by a global community of contributors, written in the Java programming language. Yahoo! has been the largest contributor to the project, and uses Hadoop extensively across its businesses. On February 19, 2008, Yahoo! Inc. launched what it claimed was the world's largest Hadoop production application. The Yahoo! Search Webmap is a Hadoop application that runs on more than 10,000 core Linux cluster and produces data that is now used in every Yahoo! Web search query. There are multiple Hadoop clusters at Yahoo!, and no HDFS filesystems or MapReduce jobs are split across multiple datacenters. Every hadoop cluster node bootstraps the Linux image, including the Hadoop distribution. Work that the clusters perform is known to include the index calculations for the Yahoo! search engine. On June 10, 2009, Yahoo! made available the source code to the version of Hadoop it runs in production. Yahoo! contributes back all work it does on Hadoop to the open-source community. The company's developers also fix bugs and provide stability improvements internally, and release this patched source code so that other users may benefit from their effort. In 2010 Facebook claimed that they had the largest Hadoop cluster in the world with 21 PB of storage. On July 27, 2011 they announced the data had grown to 30 PB. Besides Facebook and Yahoo!, many other organizations are using Hadoop to run large distributed computations. Some of the notable users include: (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Hadoop)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 10

handle system

The Handle System is a technology specification for assigning, managing, and resolving persistent identifiers for digital objects and other resources on the Internet. The protocols specified enable a distributed computer system to store identifiers (names, or handles), of digital resources and resolve those handles into the information necessary to locate, access, and otherwise make use of the resources. That information can be changed as needed to reflect the current state and/or location of the identified resource without changing the handle. The Handle System was developed by Bob Kahn, co-inventor of the TCP/IP protocols that underlie the operation of the Internet, with support from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DARPA at the Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI), which continues to develop and manage it. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Handle system)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.9%.
15 40

haptics

1 1

hashtag

Short messages on services such as Twitter, FriendFeed or identi.ca may be tagged by including one or more hashtags: words or phrases prefixed with a hash symbol (#), with multiple words concatenated, such as those in: #RealAle is my favorite kind of #beer Then, a person can search for the string #RealAle and this tagged word will appear in the search engine results. These hashtags also show up in a number of trending topics websites, including Twitter's own front page. Such tags are case-insensitive, with CamelCase often used for readability. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Hashtag)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.6%.
11 15

hcard

hCard is a microformat for publishing the contact details (which might be no more than the name) of people, companies, organizations, and places, in (X)HTML, Atom, RSS, or arbitrary XML. The hCard microformat does this using a 1:1 representation of vCard (RFC 2426) properties and values, identified using HTML classes and rel attributes. It allows parsing tools (for example other websites, or Firefox's Operator extension) to extract the details, and display them, using some other websites or mapping tools, index or search them, or to load them into an address-book program. In May 2009, Google announced that they would be parsing the hCard, hReview and hProduct microformats, and using them to populate search-result pages. In September 2010 Google announced their intention to surface hCard, hReview information in their local search results. In February 2011, Facebook began using hCard to mark up event venues. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: hCard)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 2

heritrix

Heritrix is the Internet Archive's web crawler, which was specially designed for web archiving. It is open-source and written in Java. The main interface is accessible using a web browser, and there is a command-line tool that can optionally be used to initiate crawls. Heritrix was developed jointly by Internet Archive and the Nordic national libraries on specifications written in early 2003. The first official release was in January 2004, and it has been continually improved by employees of the Internet Archive and other interested parties. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Heritrix)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 10

i-mode

NTT DoCoMo's i-mode is a mobile internet (as opposed to wireless internet) service popular in Japan. Unlike Wireless Application Protocol or WAP, i-mode encompasses a wider variety of internet standards, including web access, e-mail and the packet-switched network that delivers the data. i-mode users have access to various services such as e-mail, sports results, weather forecast, games, financial services and ticket booking. Content is provided by specialized services, typically from the mobile carrier, which allows them to have tighter control over billing. Like WAP, i-mode delivers only those services that are specifically converted for the service, or are converted through gateways. This has placed both systems at a disadvantage against handsets that use "real" browser software, and generally use a flat pricing structure for data. Even i-mode's creator, Takeshi Natsuno, has stated "I believe the iPhone (a phone that uses the traditional TCP/IP model) is closer to the mobile phone of the future, compared with the latest Japanese mobile phones." (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: i-mode)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

i18n

In computing, internationalization and localization (also spelled internationalisation and localisation, see spelling differences) are means of adapting computer software to different languages, regional differences and technical requirements of a target market. Internationalization is the process of designing a software application so that it can be adapted to various languages and regions without engineering changes. Localization is the process of adapting internationalized software for a specific region or language by adding locale-specific components and translating text. The terms are frequently abbreviated to the numeronyms i18n (where 18 stands for the number of letters between the first i and last n in internationalization, a usage coined at DEC in the 1970s or 80s) and L10n respectively, due to the length of the words. The capital L in L10n helps to distinguish it from the lowercase i in i18n. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Internationalization and localization)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 10

icalendar

iCalendar is a computer file format which allows Internet users to send meeting requests and tasks to other Internet users, via email, or sharing files with an extension of .ics. Recipients of the iCalendar data file (with supporting software, such as an email client or calendar application) can respond to the sender easily or counter propose another meeting date/time. iCalendar is used and supported by a large number of products, including Google Calendar, Apple iCal, GoDaddy Online Group Calendar, IBM Lotus Notes, Yahoo! Calendar and partially also by Microsoft Outlook. iCalendar is designed to be independent of the transport protocol. For example, certain events can be sent by traditional email or whole calendar files can be shared and edited by using a WebDav server, or SyncML. Simple web servers (using just the HTTP protocol) are often used to distribute iCalendar data about an event and to publish busy times of an individual. Publishers can embed iCalendar data in web pages using hCalendar, a 1:1 microformat representation of iCalendar in semantic (X)HTML. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: iCalendar)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

iconclass

Iconclass is a specialized library classification designed for art and iconography. It was originally conceived by Henri van de Waal, and was further developed by a group of scholars after his death. The Iconclass system is probably the largest classification system for cultural content. Initially designed for historical imagery, it is now also used to create subject access to texts and to classify a wide range of images, including modern photography. At the moment it contains over 28,000 unique concepts (classification types) and has an entry vocabulary of 14,000 keywords. It can be consulted with the help of the freely available Iconclass 2100 browser. Iconclass was developed in the Netherlands as a standard classification for recording collections, with the idea of assembling huge databases that will allow the retrieval of images featuring particular details, subjects or other common factors. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Iconclass)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 2

ieee lom

Learning Object Metadata is a data model, usually encoded in XML, used to describe a learning object and similar digital resources used to support learning. The purpose of learning object metadata is to support the reusability of learning objects, to aid discoverability, and to facilitate their interoperability, usually in the context of online learning management systems (LMS). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: IEEE LOM)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.7%.
12 27

ims common cartridge

The Common Cartridge defines a new package interchange format for learning content, able to run on any compliant LMS platform. Version 1.0 supports the following features: rich content (html, xml, web links, media files); integrated assessments; discussion forums; authorisation for protected content. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1
CSVXML
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by Dr. Radut