Skip to Content

Overview of keyword tags

Syndicate content
Key image: copyright, used under license from shutterstock.com

This page provides an overview of 595 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usagesort icon Trending factor Charts

vt100

VT100 is a video terminal that was made by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC). Its detailed attributes became the de facto standard for terminal emulators. It was introduced in August 1978, following its predecessor, the VT52, and communicated with its host system over serial lines using the ASCII character set and control sequences (a.k.a. escape sequences) standardized by ANSI. The VT100 was also the first Digital mass-market terminal to incorporate "graphic renditions" (blinking, bolding, reverse video, and underlining) as well as a selectable 80 or 132 column display. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VT100)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 6

warc

The Web ARChive (WARC) archive format specifies a method for combining multiple digital resources into an aggregate archive file together with related information. The WARC format is a revision of the Internet Archive's ARC File Format [ARC_IA] that has traditionally been used to store "web crawls" as sequences of content blocks harvested from the World Wide Web. The WARC format generalizes the older format to better support the harvesting, access, and exchange needs of archiving organizations. Besides the primary content currently recorded, the revision accommodates related secondary content, such as assigned metadata, abbreviated duplicate detection events, and later-date transformations. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web ARChive)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 6

wireframe

A website wireframe, also known as a page schematic or screen blueprint, is a visual guide that represents the skeletal framework of a website. The wireframe depicts the page layout or arrangement of the website's content, including interface elements and navigational systems, and how they work together. The wireframe usually lacks typographic style, color, or graphics, since the main focus lies in functionality, behavior, and priority of content. In other words, it focuses on 'what a screen does, not what it looks like'. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Wireframe)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 6 16.7

amazon web services

Amazon Web Services (abbreviated AWS) is a collection of remote computing services (also called web services) that together make up a cloud computing platform, offered over the Internet by Amazon.com. The most central and well-known of these services are Amazon EC2 and Amazon S3. Launched in July 2002, Amazon Web Services provide online services for other web sites or client-side applications. Most of these services are not exposed directly to end users, but instead offer functionality that other developers can use in their applications. Amazon Web Services’ offerings are accessed over HTTP, using REST and SOAP protocols. All services are billed based on usage, but how usage is measured for billing varies from service to service. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Amazon Web Services)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 7

asx

The Advanced Stream Redirector (ASX) format is a type of XML metafile designed to store a list of Windows Media files to play during a multimedia presentation. It is used frequently on streaming video servers where multiple ASF files are to be played in succession. Both RTSP and MMS streaming protocols are supported, as well as HTTP. ASX files have MIME type video/x-ms-asf (as do ASF files). With the introduction of the WMA and WMV container formats, WAX and WVX extensions have also been introduced by Microsoft respectively. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Advanced Stream Redirector (ASX) format)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 7

authentication service

An authentication service is a structured network service that determines that the digital ID being presented to a network service is being used by the real-world individual who has the rights to use it. This is often achieved through the use of a username/password combination or a digital certificate, depending on the degree of assurance required. (Excerpt from JISC Information Environment Glossary)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 7

bsd

Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD, sometimes called Berkeley Unix) is a UNIX operating system derivative developed and distributed by the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California, Berkeley, from 1977 to 1995. Historically, BSD has been considered a branch of UNIX - "BSD UNIX", because it shared the initial codebase and design with the original AT&T UNIX operating system. In the 1980s, BSD was widely adopted by vendors of workstation-class systems in the form of proprietary UNIX variants such as DEC ULTRIX and Sun Microsystems SunOS. This can be attributed to the ease with which it could be licensed, and the familiarity it found among the founders of many technology companies of this era. Though these proprietary BSD derivatives were largely superseded by the UNIX System V Release 4 and OSF/1 systems in the 1990s (both of which incorporated BSD code), later BSD releases provided a basis for several open source development projects that continue to this day. Today, the term "BSD" is often non-specifically used to refer to any of these BSD descendants, e.g., FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD or DragonFly, which together form a branch of the family of Unix-like operating systems. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: BSD)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 7

course design

Instructional Design (also called Instructional Systems Design (ISD)) is the practice of maximizing the effectiveness, efficiency and appeal of instruction and other learning experiences. The process consists broadly of determining the current state and needs of the learner, defining the end goal of instruction, and creating some "intervention" to assist in the transition. Ideally the process is informed by pedagogically (process of teaching) and andragogically (adult learning) tested theories of learning and may take place in student-only, teacher-led or community-based settings. The outcome of this instruction may be directly observable and scientifically measured or completely hidden and assumed. There are many instructional design models but many are based on the ADDIE model with the five phases: 1) analysis, 2) design, 3) development, 4) implementation, and 5) evaluation. As a field, instructional design is historically and traditionally rooted in cognitive and behavioral psychology. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Instructional design)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 7

dhtml

Dynamic HTML, or DHTML, is an umbrella term for a collection of technologies used together to create interactive and animated web sites by using a combination of a static markup language (such as HTML), a client-side scripting language (such as JavaScript), a presentation definition language (such as CSS), and the Document Object Model. DHTML allows scripting languages to change variables in a web page's definition language, which in turn affects the look and function of otherwise "static" HTML page content, after the page has been fully loaded and during the viewing process. Thus the dynamic characteristic of DHTML is the way it functions while a page is viewed, not in its ability to generate a unique page with each page load. By contrast, a dynamic web page is a broader concept ‐ any web page generated differently for each user, load occurrence, or specific variable values. This includes pages created by client-side scripting, and ones created by server-side scripting (such as PHP, Perl, JSP or ASP.NET) where the web server generates content before sending it to the client. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: DHTML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 7

diigo

Diigo is a social bookmarking website which allows signed-up users to bookmark and tag web-pages. Additionally, it allows users to highlight any part of a webpage and attach sticky notes to specific highlights or to a whole page. These annotations can be kept private, shared with a group within Diigo or a special link forwarded to someone else. The name "Diigo" is an acronym from "Digest of Internet Information, Groups and Other stuff". (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Diigo)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 7 357

microdata

Microdata is a WHATWG HTML5 specification used to nest semantics within existing content on web pages. Search engines, web crawlers, and browsers can extract and process Microdata from a web page and use it to provide a richer browsing experience for users. Microdata use a supporting vocabulary to describe an item and name-value pairs to assign values to its properties. Microdata helps technologies such as search engines and web crawlers better understand what information is contained in a web page, providing better search results. Microdata is an attempt to provide a simpler way of annotating HTML elements with machine readable tags than the similar approaches of using RDFa and Microformats. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Microdata)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 7

mobi

MOBI is the format used by the MobiPocket Reader. It may have a .mobi extension or it may have a .prc extension. The extension can be changed by the user to either of the accepted forms. In either case it may be DRM protected or non-DRM. The .prc extension is used because the PalmOS doesn't support any file extensions except .prc or .pdb. Note that Mobipocket prohibits their DRM format to be used on dedicated eBook readers that support other DRM formats. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 7

realaudio

RealAudio is a proprietary audio format developed by RealNetworks and first released in 1995. It uses a variety of audio codecs, ranging from low-bitrate formats that can be used over dialup modems, to high-fidelity formats for music. It can also be used as a streaming audio format, that is played at the same time as it is downloaded. In the past, many internet radio stations used RealAudio to stream their programming over the internet in real time. In recent years, however, the format has become less common and has given way to more popular audio formats. RealAudio was heavily used by the BBC websites until 2009, though due to its declining use, only BBC World Service is still available in this format. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RealAudio)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 7

topic map

Topic Maps is a standard for the representation and interchange of knowledge, with an emphasis on the findability of information. The ISO standard is formally known as ISO/IEC 13250:2003. A topic map represents information using: 1) topics, representing any concept, from people, countries, and organizations to software modules, individual files, and events; 2) associations, representing hypergraph relationships between topics; 3) occurrences representing information resources relevant to a particular topic. Topic Maps are similar to concept maps and mind maps in many respects, though only Topic Maps are standardized. Topic Maps are a form of semantic web technology, and some work has been undertaken on interoperability between the W3C's RDF/OWL/SPARQL family of semantic web standards and the ISO's family of Topic Maps standards. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Topic maps)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 7 14.3

agile development

Agile software development is a group of software development methodologies based on iterative and incremental development, where requirements and solutions evolve through collaboration between self-organizing, cross-functional teams. The Agile Manifesto introduced the term in 2001. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Agile development)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 8 50

authority data

Functional Requirements for Authority Data (FRAD), formerly known as Functional Requirements for Authority Records (FRAR) is a conceptual entity-relationship model developed by the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) for relating the data that are recorded in library authority records to the needs of the users of those records and facilitate and sharing of that data. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: FRAD)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
6 8

bmp

The BMP File Format, also known as Bitmap Image File or Device Independent Bitmap (DIB) file format or simply a Bitmap, is a Raster graphics image file format used to store bitmap digital images, independently of the display device (such as a graphics adapter), especially on Microsoft Windows and OS/2 operating systems. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: BMP)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 8

didl

Digital Item Declaration Language (DIDL) is an XML dialect standardized in MPEG-21. The schema files are available at MPEG. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: DIDL)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 8

ogg theora

Theora is a free lossy video compression format. It is developed by the Xiph.Org Foundation and distributed without licensing fees alongside their other free and open media projects, including the Vorbis audio format and the Ogg container. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Theora)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 8

open standard

An open standard is a standard that is publicly available and has various rights to use associated with it, and may also have various properties of how it was designed (e.g. open process). There is no single definition and interpretations vary with usage. The terms "open" and "standard" have a wide range of meanings associated with their usage. There are a number of definitions of open standards which emphasize different aspects of openness, including of the resulting specification, the openness of the drafting process, and the ownership of rights in the standard. The term "standard" is sometimes restricted to technologies approved by formalized committees that are open to participation by all interested parties and operate on a consensus basis. The definitions of the term "open standard" used by academics, the European Union and some of its member governments or parliaments such as Denmark, France, and Spain preclude open standards requiring fees for use, as do the New Zealand, South African and the Venezuelan governments. On the standard organisation side, the W3C ensures that its specifications can be implemented on a Royalty-Free (RF) basis. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Open standard)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.5%.
9 8
CSVXML
Syndicate content


about seo