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Answers to frequently asked questions

Here you can find answers to 5 questions about this site, including guidance on some of its more advanced features.

For more answers to other frequently asked questions, see our FAQ categories links in right column.

category: questions about charts

Data analysis: copyright image, used under license from shutterstock.com

Charts on this site visually represent metadata generated by our automated tagging system.

Depending upon types of data available, charts are presented in several formats:

Charts described below show patterns of usage related to keywords, organisations, projects or authors tagged across more than 1600 articles on this site.

Timeline: copyright image, used under license from shutterstock.com

Timeline charts on this site display two sets of data over time: numbers of articles published and total usage of a term.

For instance, our automated tagging system produces a timeline chart for 'rdf' that shows 6 articles mentioning 'rdf' were published in October 2008, with total of 21 references to 'rdf' across those articles.  For that specified date, the green trend line showing number of articles is therefore set at 6 and the blue trend line monitoring total usage of term is set at 21.  

You can hide or show trend lines by selecting labels near top of a timeline chart:

  • click once to hide 'Total usage' trend lines
  • click again to display 'Total usage' trend lines

As timeline charts show peaks and troughs over time surveyed, these patterns can be interpreted as general trends in usage across all sources monitored.

Screenshot: Timeline monitoring 'rdf' articles count and total usage of term
Bands of recency: copyright image, used under license from shutterstock.com

Time segment charts on this site indicate bands of recency, comparing two sets of data over time:

  • articles count (inner ring) 
  • total usage of a term (outer ring) 

In each case, these so-called 'donut' charts display proportions of discussion over time:

  • green segments indicate the proportions of articles / total usage less than 1 year old
  • amber segments indicate the proportions of articles / total usage between 1 and 3 years old
  • red segments indicate the proportions of articles / total usage more than 3 years old

As illustrated below, our automated tagging system produces a bands of recency chart for 'rdf':

  • green segments indicate relatively few discussions of 'rdf' less than 1 year old (4.26% articles / 2.71% total usage)
  • amber segments indicate some more discussions to 'rdf' are between 1 and 3 years old (12.77% articles / 11.06% total usage)
  • red segments indicate most references to 'rdf' are more than 3 years old (82.98% articles / 86.23% total usage)

With these charts showing relative proportions of discussion over time, patterns can be interpreted as general indications of a topic's aging vs recency across all sources monitored.

Screenshot: Bands of recency chart for 'rdf'
Connections: copyright image, used under license from shutterstock.com

'Top authors' and 'top terms' charts on this site monitor people and topics most frequently associated with tags

In each case, these 'stacked column' charts display extents of discussion:

  • green indicates numbers of articles tagged
  • blue indicates total usage of a specified term

As illustrated below, our automated tagging system produces a top authors chart for 'rdf':

  • green portions of columns show numbers of articles referring to 'rdf'
  • blue portions of columns indicate total usage of 'rdf'

The default view of each chart shows an overall comparison of articles and total usage.  To focus on either data set, you can select interactive labels atop each chart:

  • by de-selecting the 'articles' label, you can hide 'articles' data and focus on total usage
  • by de-selecting the 'total usage' label, you can hide 'total usage' data and focus on total numbers of articles

Labels the base of each column (circles in the screenshot below) are interactive hyperlinks, which can bring you directly to related data charts.  By following these links, you can navigate from chart to chart discovering related sequences of data visualisations.

Whether charts are monitoring 'top authors' associated with a tag, or 'top terms' associated with an author, these charts show relative intensities of engagement across all sources monitored.  Links in labels can help you identify authors most relevant to a tag and then see how authors engage with a range of topics related to tags of interest.

Screenshot: Top authors for 'rdf'
Long tail: copyright image, used under license from shutterstock.com

'Long tail' charts on this site indicate relative distributions of tags associated with an authors or key topics

In each case, these 'scatter plot' charts display scopes of tag distribution:

  • red indicates top ten tags
  • blue indicates all other tags

As illustrated below, our automated tagging system produces a long tail: all authors chart for 'rdf':

  • red dots show relative distributions of articles / total usage for top 10 authors referring to 'rdf'
  • blue dots show relative distributions of articles / total usage for all other authors referring to 'rdf'

Beneath each chart you can find tag links and statistical information directly related to each of the dots in the chart above.  By following these tag links, you can move directly to overviews of articles directly related to each tag of interest and then navigate to further data charts.

Screenshot: All authors data charts and links


by Dr. Radut