Ariadne gallery http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/gallery?find=&issue=issue67&article-type= RSS feed: articles with images in Ariadne image gallery en Image 'Quotation' Using the C.I.T.E. Architecture http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell#author1">Christopher Blackwell</a> and <a href="/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell#author2">Amy Hackney Blackwell</a> describe with examples a digital library infrastructure that affords canonical citation for 'quoting' images, useful for creating commentaries, arguments, and teaching tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Quotation is the heart of scholarly argument and teaching, the activity of bringing insight to something complex by focused discussion of its parts. Philosophers who have reflected on the question of quotation have identified two necessary components: a name, pointer, or citation on the one hand and a reproduction or repetition on the other. Robert Sokolowski calls quotation a 'curious conjunction of being able to name and to contain' [<a href="#1">1</a>]; V.A. Howard is more succinct: quotation is 'replication-plus-reference' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. We are less interested in the metaphysical aspects of quotation than in the practical ones.</p> <p>The tools and techniques described here were supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 0916148 &amp; No. 0916421. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).</p> <h2 id="Quotation">Quotation</h2> <p>Quotation, when accompanied by citation, allows us to bring the reader's attention to bear on a particular part of a larger whole efficiently and without losing the surrounding context. A work of Biblical exegesis, for example, can quote or merely cite 'Genesis 1:29' without having to reproduce the entire Hebrew Bible, or even the Book of Genesis; a reader can resolve that citation to a particular passage about the creation of plants, and can see that passage as a discrete node at the bottom of a narrowing hierarchy: Hebrew Bible, Genesis, Chapter 1, Verse 29. We take this for granted.</p> <p>Quoting a text is easy. But how can we quote an image? This remains difficult even in the 21st century where it is easy to reproduce digital images, pass them around through networks, and manipulate them on our desks.</p> <p>A scholar wishing to refer to a particular part of an image will generally do something like this: She will open one version of an image in some editing software, select and 'cut' a section from it, and 'paste' that section into a document containing the text of her commentary or argument. She might add to the text of her argument a reference to the source of the image. The language that describes this process is that of mechanical work&nbsp;– cutting and pasting&nbsp;– rather than the language of quotation and citation. The process yields a fragment of an image with only a tenuous connection to the ontological hierarchy of the object of study. The same scholar who would never give a citation to '<em>The Bible</em>, page 12' rather than to 'Genesis 1:29' will, of necessity, cite an image-fragment in a way similarly unlikely to help readers find the source and locate the fragment in its natural context.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article amy hackney blackwell christopher blackwell clemson university furman university google harvard university national academy of sciences national science foundation university of virginia gnu homer multitext archives browser creative commons css data digital library doi dublin core firefox free software html identifier infrastructure java licence metadata namespace openoffice research safari schema software standards stylesheet tei thesaurus url urn vocabularies web browser xhtml xml xsl xslt zip Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1620 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk MyMobileBristol http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author1">Mike Jones</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author2">Simon Price</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author3">Nikki Rogers</a> and <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author4">Damian Steer</a> describe the rationale, aims and progress of MyMobileBristol, highlighting some of the challenges and opportunities that have arisen during the project.</p> </div> </div> </div> The MyMobileBristol Project is managed and developed by the Web Futures group at the Institute for Learning and Research Technology (ILRT), University of Bristol [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The project has a number of broad and ambitious aims and objectives, including collaboration with Bristol City Council on the development or adoption of standards with regard to the exchange of time- and location-sensitive data within the Bristol region, with particular emphasis on transport, the environment and sustainability. <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article damian steer mike jones nikki rogers simon price ilrt jisc jisc techdis ordnance survey ukoln university of bristol w3c web futures datagovuk devcsi mca mobile campus assistant mymobilebristol apache api atom authentication blog browser bsd cataloguing content management data data set database dissemination e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis higher education html intellectual property java javascript jena ldap licence machine learning mobile mobile phone native app native applications open data open source operating system portal portfolio rdf research resource description restful rss search technology semantic web smartphone software sparql sql standards usability web app web browser web services wiki wireless xml Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1622 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk UK Reading Experience Database http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt#author1">Bethan Ruddock</a> reports from the launch event for the UK Reading Experience Database, held at the Betty Boothroyd Library, the Open University, Milton Keynes, on 24 February 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><p>I was invited down to the Open University (OU) Betty Boothroyd Library in Milton Keynes for the launch of the UK Reading Experience Database (UK RED) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. I had been asked to attend to talk about the LOCAH Project and Linked Data, but I was also looking forward to learning about the RED Project.</p> <p>This was the first of two launch days, and was designed for librarians, archivists, and information managers. A second launch day for teachers in Higher Education was to be held in London the next day.</p> <h2 id="What_Is_UK_RED">What Is UK RED?</h2> <p>The tagline for UK RED is 'the experience of reading in Britain from 1450 to 1945', and the database brings together reading experiences, making them both searchable and browsable. What is a reading experience? It is evidence of anyone alive between the mid-15th and 20thcenturies having read and interacted with a book or other piece of writing, such as magazines, newspapers, letters - even playbills and advertisements. Ownership alone is not enough; there must be something to show that the person in question actually read the work or at least part of it.</p> <p>This information can be found in a number of places - a printed book review would be an obvious example. The RED team also find many entries in diaries. Such entries can range from simple lists of books that someone has read over the course of a year, to detailed descriptions of when and where they read a particular book, and how they felt about it. Often diary entries are not actually about the book; it is mentioned in passing and in the context of a number of other activities.</p> <p>While the owner's name on the flyleaf is not itself enough to justify a 'reading experience', annotations to the text are, as they show that the person has actually interacted with the text. Of course, you then have to consider whether the person whose name is on the flyleaf is the same as the person doing the annotating!</p> <p>RED is much more than a list of 'people who have read books'. The database aims to bring out as much information as possible about the reading experience. The interface to submit a new entry allows you to specify where the reading was taking place, all the way down to a particular room in a particular house. It also aims to identify if the reading was silent or aloud, alone or with other people; whether the book was owned by the reader, a library book, borrowed, or even stolen. All these data are then used to build up a rich database of information on who was reading what (and how!) in Britain.</p> <p>UK RED is not just concerned with reading experiences within Britain: team members also look at the reading experiences of citizens abroad. <strong>Edmund King</strong>, Research Associate, Reading Experience Database, OU, told us that, as a consequence, there are fascinating examples of what captured British soldiers were reading in prisoner-of-war (POW) camps as well as examples of what they were not allowed to read. Books in Welsh and Pakistani were banned, as well as atlases and anything about the Russian revolution. I do not know if there are corresponding records for what prisoners in UK POW camps were forbidden to read, but it would be very interesting to find out.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report bethan ruddock ahrc eduserv jisc mimas newcastle university open university talis ukoln university of manchester university of oxford archives hub dbpedia locah lucero wikipedia apache archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing copac copyright data data set database dissemination flickr higher education intellectual property linked data linux open source php provenance research software sparql sql twitter video Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1629 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Educational Resources Hack Day http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt#author1">Kirsty Pitkin</a> reports on a two-day practical hack event focusing on Open Educational Resources (OER), held by DevCSI and JISC CETIS in Manchester on 31 March - 1 April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Open Educational Resources Hack Day event was designed to bring together those interested in rapidly developing tools and prototypes to solve problems related to OER. Whilst there is a growing interest in the potential for learning resources created and shared openly by academics and teachers, a number of technical challenges still exist, including resource retrieval, evaluation and reuse. This event aimed to explore some of these problem areas by partnering developers with the creators and users of OER to identify needs and potential solutions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report kirsty pitkin cetis google harper adams university college jisc leeds metropolitan university oai open university ukoln university of bolton university of oxford w3c devcsi jorum oerbital xpert accessibility aggregation api authentication blog browser cataloguing creative commons data data set doi drupal facebook identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects licence linked data metadata mobile moodle oai-pmh oer open source openoffice portal provenance repositories resource sharing rss search engine optimisation search technology software storify sword protocol ukoer url video visualisation vle widget wiki wookie wordpress youtube Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1630 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Envisioning Future Academic Library Services http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews a timely collection of essays that highlights the values of institutional leadership and resourcefulness in academic librarianship's engagements with Web 2.0.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Since networked information technology has initiated a breathtaking transformation of knowledge practices, librarians have had a generous supply of thought leaders whose lifetime experience has permitted them to issue credible translations of the 'writing on the wall'. Recently, however, there seems to be many more analysts (and soothsayers) and much more anxious observation and published interpretation of such writing. And the message comes in a red ink, in bold, and with distinct portent, when not downright ominous.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review john azzolini british library clifford chance google university of melbourne yale university bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright curation data data management data set digital library digitisation disruptive innovation dissemination ebook framework higher education ict knowledge management mobile muves open access personalisation preservation research search technology second life web 2.0 Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1632 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Preparing Collections for Digitization http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews a recently published book on the selection and preparation of archive and library collections for digitisation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Over the past 20 years a great deal of information and guidance has been published to support cultural heritage organisations interested in undertaking digitisation projects. It is well over a decade now since the seminal Joint National Preservation Office and Research Libraries Group Preservation Conference on <em>Guidelines for digital imaging</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>] and standard introductory texts on digitisation like Anne Kenney and Oya Rieger's <em>Moving theory into practice</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>] and Stuart Lee's <em>Digital imaging: a practical handbook</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] are of a similar age - although still extremely useful. More up-to-date guidance is also available from services like JISC Digital Media [<a href="#4">4</a>] and the Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p><!-- <img alt="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue67-day-rvw/711-1.jpg" style="float: right; width: 102px; height: 152px; " title="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" /> --><!-- <img alt="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue67-day-rvw/711-1.jpg" style="float: right; width: 102px; height: 152px; " title="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" /> --></p><p>Into this mix comes this new book on the preparation of collections for digitisation by Anna Bülow and Jess Ahmon, respectively Head of Preservation and Preservation Officer at The National Archives in Kew, London. The book claims to fill a gap in the existing literature, covering the practical aspects of safeguarding collections during image capture. It is perhaps worth noting upfront that the main focus of the book is on textual resources and documentary records, meaning that it would seem to be most useful for those working in the libraries and archives sectors.</p> <p>The first chapter provides some essential context, linking digitisation initiatives to the ongoing collection management practices of archives and libraries. It makes the general point that collection management has three main aspects: the <em>development</em>, <em>use</em> and <em>preservation</em> of collections.</p> <blockquote><p>Collection management involves making well informed decisions in order to prioritise actions and optimise the allocation of resources to maintain as much accessible value as possible. (p. 5)</p></blockquote> <p>Bülow and Ahmon argue that digital technologies have created new challenges for collection management, e.g. being partly responsible for a shift in attention from the development and <em>preservation</em> role to the development and <em>use</em> role. In practice, however, the link between the roles can be more nuanced. For example, in some cases digitisation may benefit conservation aims by helping to reduce the physical handling of fragile materials. In general, however, the authors feel that while the long-term sustainability challenges of digital content remain unresolved, "digitization of any book or document cannot be seen as a preservation measure for the original itself." (p. 8). The chapter concludes with a brief outline of the four phases of digitisation, each of which is made up of multiple steps. Of these, this book focuses primarily on the first two stages, covering all of the tasks that need to be done prior to imaging (e.g. selection, rights clearance, document preparation) as well as those associated with the digitisation process itself (imaging, quality assurance, transcription, metadata creation). The remaining two stages, chiefly facilitating use and sustainability, are not dealt with in any detail by this book.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review michael day harvard university jisc jisc digital media library association the national archives ukoln university of bath algorithm archives digital media digital preservation digitisation file format interoperability metadata preservation provenance research resource description standards tiff Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1633 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Expert Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/lafortune-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/lafortune-rvw#author1">Sylvie Lafortune</a> reviews a book taking a hard look at academic libraries, how they are being redefined and what skills will be required of the staff who will move them forward.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>E-Science, creative disorder, innovators wanted, core competencies and hybridisation of library personnel are some of the concepts you will find in the titles of the 13 chapters which make up this collected work. The editors, both library administrators at two large universities in the US, introduce the book by asking: in view of the major changes that are taking place in academic libraries, who should we be hiring to provide services in areas of 'critical campus concern' such as undergraduate research, data curation, intellectual property management and e-science? Indeed, this question is not taken lightly, and some of the answers offered by the authors are the result of extensive, ongoing discussion and reflection on how best to build capacity in libraries to deal with emerging resources and services.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/lafortune-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review sylvie lafortune laurentian university university of illinois archives cataloguing curation data e-science gis instructional design intellectual property metadata preservation research visualisation Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1634 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk