Ariadne gallery http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/gallery?find=&issue=issue67&article-type=review RSS feed: articles with images in Ariadne image gallery en Book Review: Envisioning Future Academic Library Services http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews a timely collection of essays that highlights the values of institutional leadership and resourcefulness in academic librarianship's engagements with Web 2.0.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Since networked information technology has initiated a breathtaking transformation of knowledge practices, librarians have had a generous supply of thought leaders whose lifetime experience has permitted them to issue credible translations of the 'writing on the wall'. Recently, however, there seems to be many more analysts (and soothsayers) and much more anxious observation and published interpretation of such writing. And the message comes in a red ink, in bold, and with distinct portent, when not downright ominous.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review john azzolini british library clifford chance google university of melbourne yale university bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright curation data data management data set digital library digitisation disruptive innovation dissemination ebook framework higher education ict knowledge management mobile muves open access personalisation preservation research search technology second life web 2.0 Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1632 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Preparing Collections for Digitization http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews a recently published book on the selection and preparation of archive and library collections for digitisation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Over the past 20 years a great deal of information and guidance has been published to support cultural heritage organisations interested in undertaking digitisation projects. It is well over a decade now since the seminal Joint National Preservation Office and Research Libraries Group Preservation Conference on <em>Guidelines for digital imaging</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>] and standard introductory texts on digitisation like Anne Kenney and Oya Rieger's <em>Moving theory into practice</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>] and Stuart Lee's <em>Digital imaging: a practical handbook</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] are of a similar age - although still extremely useful. More up-to-date guidance is also available from services like JISC Digital Media [<a href="#4">4</a>] and the Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p><!-- <img alt="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue67-day-rvw/711-1.jpg" style="float: right; width: 102px; height: 152px; " title="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" /> --><!-- <img alt="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue67-day-rvw/711-1.jpg" style="float: right; width: 102px; height: 152px; " title="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" /> --></p><p>Into this mix comes this new book on the preparation of collections for digitisation by Anna Bülow and Jess Ahmon, respectively Head of Preservation and Preservation Officer at The National Archives in Kew, London. The book claims to fill a gap in the existing literature, covering the practical aspects of safeguarding collections during image capture. It is perhaps worth noting upfront that the main focus of the book is on textual resources and documentary records, meaning that it would seem to be most useful for those working in the libraries and archives sectors.</p> <p>The first chapter provides some essential context, linking digitisation initiatives to the ongoing collection management practices of archives and libraries. It makes the general point that collection management has three main aspects: the <em>development</em>, <em>use</em> and <em>preservation</em> of collections.</p> <blockquote><p>Collection management involves making well informed decisions in order to prioritise actions and optimise the allocation of resources to maintain as much accessible value as possible. (p. 5)</p></blockquote> <p>Bülow and Ahmon argue that digital technologies have created new challenges for collection management, e.g. being partly responsible for a shift in attention from the development and <em>preservation</em> role to the development and <em>use</em> role. In practice, however, the link between the roles can be more nuanced. For example, in some cases digitisation may benefit conservation aims by helping to reduce the physical handling of fragile materials. In general, however, the authors feel that while the long-term sustainability challenges of digital content remain unresolved, "digitization of any book or document cannot be seen as a preservation measure for the original itself." (p. 8). The chapter concludes with a brief outline of the four phases of digitisation, each of which is made up of multiple steps. Of these, this book focuses primarily on the first two stages, covering all of the tasks that need to be done prior to imaging (e.g. selection, rights clearance, document preparation) as well as those associated with the digitisation process itself (imaging, quality assurance, transcription, metadata creation). The remaining two stages, chiefly facilitating use and sustainability, are not dealt with in any detail by this book.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review michael day harvard university jisc jisc digital media library association the national archives ukoln university of bath algorithm archives digital media digital preservation digitisation file format interoperability metadata preservation provenance research resource description standards tiff Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1633 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Expert Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/lafortune-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/lafortune-rvw#author1">Sylvie Lafortune</a> reviews a book taking a hard look at academic libraries, how they are being redefined and what skills will be required of the staff who will move them forward.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>E-Science, creative disorder, innovators wanted, core competencies and hybridisation of library personnel are some of the concepts you will find in the titles of the 13 chapters which make up this collected work. The editors, both library administrators at two large universities in the US, introduce the book by asking: in view of the major changes that are taking place in academic libraries, who should we be hiring to provide services in areas of 'critical campus concern' such as undergraduate research, data curation, intellectual property management and e-science? Indeed, this question is not taken lightly, and some of the answers offered by the authors are the result of extensive, ongoing discussion and reflection on how best to build capacity in libraries to deal with emerging resources and services.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/lafortune-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review sylvie lafortune laurentian university university of illinois archives cataloguing curation data e-science gis instructional design intellectual property metadata preservation research visualisation Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1634 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk