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Project tags used most often over past 52 weeks (RFU)

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This page provides an overview of 25 project tags in Ariadne, ordered by recency score.

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Project Description Recent frequent usage (RFU) Charts

scarlet

The SCARLET (Special Collections using Augmented Reality to Enhance Learning and Teaching) project has been working with academics, students and the John Rylands University Library at the University of Manchester to exploit AR to enhance access to their Special Collections with great success (http://teamscarlet.wordpress.com). This project builds on the mixed team approach adopted, and giving two other UK universities the knowledge and skills needed to use Augmented Reality (AR) to enhance access to their collections, by embedding the SCARLET Toolkit. The project works with enthusiastic staff at the University of Sussex and the Craft Study Centre at the University for the Creative Arts to trial the AR Toolkit with two different types of collections (mass observations and visual arts). This results in two case studies of embedding AR in the wider community and further examples of AR applications. (Excerpt from this source)

60

linkedup project

The LinkedUp Project is a FP7 Support Action which pushes forward the exploitation and adoption of public, open data available on the Web, in particular by educational organisations and institutions. To address these goals, LinkedUp provides a range of activities, including the establishment of the LinkedUp Challenge and a corresponding evaluation framework. These are aimed at identifying and promoting innovative success stories which exploit large-scale Web data in educational scenarios as part of robust applications and tools. The project is made up of consortium partners each with respective roles in the LinkedUp project. There are also a number of associated partners with an interest in the project. The LinkedUp Challenge has an advisory board consisting of renowned experts in the fields of open data and data management, semantic web and Web-based education. (Excerpt from this source)

22

kaptur

Building upon the work undertaken by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC), KAPTUR will discover, create and pilot a sectoral model of best practice in the management of research data in the visual arts. Led by the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS), the project will be undertaken in collaboration with four institutional partners, who will support the creation of the model, then apply, test and pilot it within their respective institutions. The four institutional partners are: Glasgow School of Art; Goldsmiths, University of London; University for the Creative Arts; and University of the Arts London. The results will be fed back into the model, which will be revised and then published freely to the wider higher education community for use and reuse. Research data is seen as a valuable resource and, with appropriate curation and management; it has much to offer learning, teaching, research, knowledge transfer and consultancy activities in the visual arts. To address the lack of awareness and usage of research data management systems in the arts, the KAPTUR project seeks: to investigate the current state of the management of research data in the arts; to develop a model of best practice applicable to both specialist arts institutions and arts departments in multidisciplinary institutions; and to apply, test and embed the model with four institutional partners. (Excerpt from this source)

15

wikipedia

Wikipedia is a free, web-based, collaborative, multilingual encyclopedia project supported by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation. Its 18 million articles (over 3.6 million in English) have been written collaboratively by volunteers around the world, and almost all of its articles can be edited by anyone with access to the site. Wikipedia was launched in 2001 by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger and has become the largest and most popular general reference work on the Internet, ranking around seventh among all websites on Alexa and having 365 million readers. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Wikipedia)

9

dmponline

DMP Online has been produced by the UK's Digital Curation Centre to help research teams respond to a recommendation in Lyon (2007) that "Each funded research project should submit a structured Data Management Plan for peer-review as an integral part of the application for funding." It draws upon the DCC's analysis of funders' requirements to help project teams in creating up to three iterations of a data management plan; the first ('minimal') plan for use at the grant application stage, a second ('core') version which is developed at the early-project stage and maintained throughout the project lifecycle, and a third ('full') plan which addresses issues of long-term preservation and access. (Excerpt from this source)

7

europeana

Europeana.eu is an internet portal that gives access to millions of books, paintings, films, museum objects and archival records that have been digitised throughout Europe. Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci, Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer, the works of Charles Darwin and Isaac Newton and the music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart are some of the highlights on Europeana. Around 1500 institutions across Europe have contributed to Europeana. These range from major international names like the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, the British Library and the Louvre to regional archives and local museums from every member of the EU. Together, their assembled collections let users explore Europe's cultural and scientific heritage from prehistory to the modern day. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Europeana)

6

jorum

Jorum is a JISC-funded Service in Development in UK Further and Higher Education, to collect and share learning and teaching materials, allowing their reuse and repurposing. This free online repository service forms a key part of the JISC Information Environment, and is intended to become part of the wider landscape of repositories being developed institutionally, locally, regionally or across subject areas. We use a modified version of DSpace for Jorum. Jorum is run by Mimas, based at the University of Manchester. The word æJorumÆ is of Biblical origin and means a collecting (or drinking) bowl. (Excerpt from this source)

6

worldcat

WorldCat is a union catalog which itemizes the collections of 71,000 libraries in 112 countries which participate in the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) global cooperative. It is built and maintained collectively by the participating libraries. Created in 1971, it contains more than 150 million different records pointing to over 1.4 billion physical and digital assets in more than 470 languages. It is the world's largest bibliographic database. OCLC makes WorldCat itself available free to libraries, but the catalog is the foundation for other fee-based OCLC services (such as resource sharing and collection management). WorldCat was founded by Fred Kilgour in 1967. In 2003, OCLC began the "Open WorldCat" pilot program, making abbreviated records from a subset of WorldCat available to partner Web sites and booksellers, to increase the accessibility of its member libraries' collections. In 2006, it became possible to search WorldCat directly at its website. In 2007, WorldCat Identities began providing pages for 20 million "identities", predominantly authors and persons who are the subjects of published titles. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: WorldCat)

5

eboni

EBONI identified and compared the various methods in the publication of learning and teaching material on the Web in order to determine the most effective way of representing this information electronically, aiming to maximise usability and information intake by users. An evaluation of texts by an appropriate mix of key stakeholders was undertaken in order to develop guidelines for best practice in the publication of (non-journal) educational material on the Internet. EBONI developed a set of guidelines for publishing educational texts on the Web that reflect the needs of academics and a diversifying population of students throughout the UK. Project start date: 2000-08-01. Project end date: 2002-07-31. (Excerpt from this source)

4

web accessibility initiative

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)'s Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) is an effort to improve the accessibility of the World Wide Web (WWW or Web) for people with disabilities. People with disabilities may encounter difficulties when using computers generally, but also on the Web. Since people with disabilities often require non-standard devices and browsers, making websites more accessible also benefits a wide range of user agents and devices, including mobile devices, which have limited resources. The W3C launched the Web Accessibility in 1997 with endorsement by The White House and W3C members. It has several working groups and interest groups that work on guidelines, technical reports, educational materials and other documents that relate to the several different components of web accessibility. These components include web content, web browsers and media players, authoring tools, and evaluation tools. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web Accessibility Initiative)

4

dbpedia

DBpedia is a project aiming to extract structured content from the information created as part of the Wikipedia project. This structured information is then made available on the World Wide Web. DBpedia allows users to query relationships and properties associated with Wikipedia resources, including links to other related datasets. DBpedia has been described by Tim Berners-Lee as one of the more famous parts of the Linked Data project. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Dbpedia)

3

rsp

The Repositories Support Project (RSP) began as a 2.5 year project to co-ordinate and deliver good practice and practical advice to English and Welsh HEIs to enable the implementation, management and development of digital institutional repositories. The second, 3-year phase, began in March 2009. The RSP will contribute to building repository capacity, knowledge and skills within institutions. Through providing guidance and advice it will benefit the whole of the UK sector resulting in the wider take-up and development of institutional repositories in HEIs. The aim of the RSP is to progress the vision of a deployed network of inter-working repositories for academic papers, learning materials and research data across the UK. Whilst fulfilling the business requirements of HEIs to manage their assets, showcase research outputs, and share learning materials, such a network of populated repositories will be a major step forward in the provision of open access materials. As basic objectives of the project it has been agreed with JISC that the RSP should provide activities, support and advice, to achieve: * More repositories * More content in repositories * More use of content by researchers. *More re-use of that content by service providers offering innovative services *Wide-spread acceptance and use of standards-based approach to repository development and use. The First Phase of the project ran from October 2006 until March 2009, under the Repositories and Preservation Programme (http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/reppres.aspx ), and was a consortium of the University of Nottingham, University of Wales Aberystwyth, University of Southampton, and UKOLN. The Second Phase of the project runs from March 2009 until March 2012, and is being carried out by the Centre for Research Communications at the University of Nottingham. Project start date: 2006-10-01. Project end date: 2012-03-30. (Excerpt from this source)

3

jisc information environment

The JISC Information Environment aims to help provide convenient access to resources for research and learning through the use of resource discovery and resource management tools and the development of better services and practice. The Information Environment aims to allow discovery, access and use of resources for research and learning irrespective of their location.There is now a critical mass of digital information resources that can be used to support researchers, learners, teachers and administrators in their work and study. The production of information is on the increase and ways to deal with this effectively are required. There is the need to ensure that quality information isnÆt lost amongst the masses of digital data created everyday. If we can continue to improve the management, interrogation and serving of æqualityÆ information there is huge potential to enhance knowledge creation across learning and research communities. (Excerpt from this source)

2

jusp

Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) development partnership includes JISC Collections, Mimas at The University of Manchester, Evidence Base at Birmingham City University and Cranfield University. A successful portal prototype was originally developed in 2009, taking in usage data (COUNTER JR1, JR1a and JR5 reports) from five libraries in respect of three NESLi2 publisher agreements. This prototype demonstrated that the portal can provide a basic "one-stop shop" where libraries could go to view and download their own usage reports from NESLi2 publishers, a move welcomed by libraries that currently have to go into each publisher's password protected administration sites separately. In addition, aggregated publishers' usage statistics (with those from gateway or host intermediary sites) provide a truer picture of overall usage statistics. (Excerpt from this source)

2

mrc

This project will work with MRC recommended case studies to explore Data Management Plans in the medical context. Project start date: 2010-06-01. Project end date: 2011-04-30. (Excerpt from this source)

2

open exeter

Open Exeter was a JISC-funded project aiming to create an environment in which the University of Exeter was equipped to 'act open' with its research data. The objective was to create an environment in which Exeter was equipped to 'act open' with its research data in order to facilitate collaboration and increase the global impact of research. The Open Exeter project examined how research data is created, managed and used across the University of Exeter in order to create an institutional data repository for all types of research data. It also implemented training and guidance for researchers and reviewed and ratified institutional policy on research data. (Excerpt from this source)

2

repositories support project

The Repositories Support Project (RSP) is a 5.5 year JISC-funded initiative contributing to building repository capacity, knowledge and skills within UK higher education institutions. Through providing guidance and advice it benefits the whole of the UK sector resulting in the wider take-up and development of institutional repositories in HEIs. The aim of the project is to progress the vision of a deployed network of interoperable repositories for academic papers, learning materials and research data across the UK. Whilst fulfilling the business requirements of HEIs to manage their assets, showcase research outputs, and share learning materials, such a network of populated repositories is a major step forward in the provision of open access materials. (Excerpt from this source)

2

romeo

The RoMEO Project (Rights MEtadata for Open archiving) was a JISC project investigating the rights issues surrounding the 'self-archiving' of research in the UK academic community under the Open Archive Initiative's Protocol for Metadata Harvesting. It performed a series of stakeholder surveys to ascertain how 'give-away' research literature (and metadata) is used, and how it should be protected. Building on existing schemas and vocabularies (such as Open Digital Rights Language) a series of rights elements was developed and a solution for the protection of the IPR in metadata itself was also created. A follow up to the Romeo project was another project called 'Partnering on Copyright', aiming to contribute to raising awareness of the copyright issues surrounding self archiving. The Partnering on Copyright project has provided an advocacy toolkit for promoting the copyright issues surrounding self archiving and has led to further developments on the SHERPA/RoMEO database. (Excerpt from this source)

2

citeulike

CiteULike is based on the principle of social bookmarking and is aimed to promote and to develop the sharing of scientific references amongst researchers. In the same way that it is possible to catalog web pages (with Furl and del.icio.us) or photographs (with Flickr), scientists can share information on academic papers with specific tools (like CiteULike) developed for that purpose. The website is sponsored by the publisher Springer Science+Business Media. Richard Cameron developed CiteULike in November 2004 and in 2006 Oversity Ltd. was established to develop and support CiteULike. When browsing issues of research journals, small scripts stored in bookmarks (bookmarklets) allow one to import articles from repositories like PubMed, and CiteULike supports many more. Then the system attempts to determine the article metadata (title, authors, journal name, etc.) automatically. Users can organize their libraries with freely chosen tags and this produces a folksonomy of academic interests. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: CiteULike)

1

heron

Heron provides a service for UK academic institutions that wish to provide online access to student readings. Increasingly students today are working part time or are distance learners. They often study off campus and want quick and easy access to learning materials. Higher and Further Education Institutions are responding by providing access to electronic texts and developing virtual learning environments (VLEs). Heron primarily deals with book and journal extracts. It has developed a resource bank of over 2.5 million digitised extracts for rapid re-use (subject to copyright permissions). Heron also offers its subscribers experience and strength in negotiations with publishers and other rightsholders. (Excerpt from this source)

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