Table of contents: issue65 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/1121/issues/all?article-type=feature%20article&term=&organisation=&project=&author= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en From Passive to Active Preservation of Electronic Records http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/briston-estlund <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/briston-estlund#author1">Heather Briston</a> and <a href="/issue65/briston-estlund#author2">Karen Estlund</a> provide a narrative of the process adopted by the University of Oregon in order to integrate electronic records management into its staff's workflow.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2 of article incorporating edits from XHTML view 20101123 - rew --><!-- v2 of article incorporating edits from XHTML view 20101123 - rew --><p>Permanent records of the University of Oregon (UO) are archived by the Special Collections and University Archives located within the University Libraries. In the digital environment, a new model is being created to ingest, curate and preserve electronic records. This article discusses two case studies working with the Office of the President to preserve electronic records.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/briston-estlund" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article heather briston karen estlund google microsoft oais the national archives university of oregon adobe archives blog cataloguing content management data management digital asset management digital preservation digital record object identification digital repositories droid dspace dvd ead eportfolio file format identifier infrastructure institutional repository microsoft office ocr optical character recognition preservation privacy repositories standards tagging video web 2.0 xml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1584 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Locating Image Presentation Technology Within Pedagogic Practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> contextualises image presentation technology and methods within a pedagogic framework for the visual arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article marie-therese gramstadt apple blackboard bournemouth university edinburgh college of art google imperial college london jisc jisc digital media microsoft oreilly university for the creative arts university of brighton university of london university of sheffield university of surrey university of the arts london vads pictiva accessibility adobe archives blog browser cataloguing data database digital media e-learning elluminate facebook flash flickr google maps gotomeeting higher education html5 ipad learning design learning objects mac os microsoft office multimedia operating system photoshop podcast portal portfolio research safari screencast software standards usb video vle web 2.0 web resources wiki windows youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1585 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Trust Me, I'm an Archivist http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/hilton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/hilton-et-al#author1">Christopher Hilton</a>, <a href="/issue65/hilton-et-al#author2">Dave Thompson</a> and <a href="/issue65/hilton-et-al#author3">Natalie Walters</a> describe some of the issues of engaging with donors when it comes to transferring born-digital material to the Library.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!--v2: to reflect final author edits : 2010-11-18-21-54 rew --><!--v2: to reflect final author edits : 2010-11-18-21-54 rew --><p>Born-digital archival material represents the single most important challenge to the archival profession for a generation or more. It requires us to rethink issues and assumptions around acquisition, preservation, cataloguing and reader access. Not least is the problem of getting donors to transfer their born-digital material to us. We have encountered four common scenarios that seem to act as blocks to the transfer of such material. We also need to change the way we engage with donors. This is a challenge that we cannot duck unless we wish to condemn our collection to increasing irrelevance.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem?</h2> <p>Managing born-digital material is difficult. We all have trouble finding, storing and managing the data we create. Yet we have an attachment to this transient and ephemeral stuff that we find hard to relinquish. We seem to have a stronger emotional attachment to digital material than we did with paper. Thus, donors who have happily donated paper archival materials to the Library struggle with the challenges of donating born-digital material, challenges that are not always technical.</p> <h2 id="The_Current_State_of_Play">The Current State of Play</h2> <p>Two previous articles in <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>] have reported on the Wellcome Library's engagement with born-digital material: for readers who have not seen these it is appropriate to begin by recapitulating the themes established there.</p> <p>The Wellcome Library is a collecting institution and the majority of its archival holdings are acquired from outside bodies or individuals by purchase, deposit or gift. The Library has no mandate to require an organisation or individual to lodge their records in the Library, and little influence over their use of particular formats or technologies. Conversely the Library is not required to take in any given material. The archivists have the freedom to decide what material to accept or if a particular format is too problematic to acquire when set against the material's informational value.</p> <p>The Library's work with digital material is based on two central principles:</p> <ol> <li>That sound archival practice is wholly appropriate to working with born-digital materials.</li> <li>That if the Library does not acquire born-digital archival material then its future relevance as a research Library is compromised.<br /> </li></ol><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/hilton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article christopher hilton dave thompson natalie walters wellcome library archives blog born digital cataloguing data digital archive digital curation preservation provenance research software standards Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1586 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Why UK Further and Higher Education Needs Local Software Developers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/mahey-walk <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/mahey-walk#author1">Mahendra Mahey</a> and <a href="/issue65/mahey-walk#author2">Paul Walk</a> discuss the work of the Developer Community Supporting Innovation (DevCSI) Project which focuses on building capacity for software developers in UK Further and Higher Education to support innovation in the sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Software developers are important to Further (FE) and Higher Education (HE). They are needed to develop and implement local FEI (Further Education Institution) and HEI (Higher Education Institution) solutions, to build e-infrastructure, and to innovate and develop ideas and prototypes that can be exploited by others. They also play an important part in the development and uptake of open standards and interoperability.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/mahey-walk" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article mahendra mahey paul walk bbc google harvard university jisc oracle ukoln university of bath university of london devcsi list8d accessibility blog data digital repositories disruptive innovation eprints further education google docs higher education infrastructure interoperability metadata python rdf rdfa repositories research software ulcc video Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1587 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Academic Liaison Librarianship: Curatorial Pedagogy or Pedagogical Curation? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/parsons <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/parsons#author1">Allan Parsons</a> presents a strategic view of the need to develop the academic liaison librarianship role.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3 : Late changes from XHTML review in terms of references -REW 2010-11-18-16-12 --><!-- v3 : Late changes from XHTML review in terms of references -REW 2010-11-18-16-12 --><p>When reflecting on a methodological approach and set of research practices with which he was closely associated, Bruno Latour suggested that, "there are four things that do not work with actor-network theory; the word actor, the word network, the word theory and the hyphen!" [<a href="#1">1</a>]. In a similar vein, it could be suggested that, "there are three things that do not work with academic liaison librarianship: the word academic, the word liaison and the word librarianship". Why so?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/parsons" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article allan parsons dcc open university research information network sconul smithsonian institution university of oxford university of westminster archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing collection development curation data data set database digital curation dublin core e-research framework higher education information society infrastructure managerialism metadata ontologies repositories research taxonomy vocabularies web 2.0 web development Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1588 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk What Is a URI and Why Does It Matter? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/thompson-hs#author1">Henry S. Thompson</a> describes how recent developments in Web technology have affected the relationship between URI and resource representation and the related consequences.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>URI stands for Uniform Resource Identifier, the official name for those things you see all the time on the Web that begin <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'http:'</font> or <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'mailto:'</font>, for example <span class="style1">http://<em>www.w3.org</em>/</span>, which is the URI for the home page of the World Wide Web Consortium [<a href="#1">1</a>]. (These things were called URLs (Uniform Resource Locators) in the early days of the Web, and the change from URL to URI is either hugely significant or completely irrelevant, depending on who is talking—I have nothing to say about this issue in this article. If you have never heard of URIs (or IRIs, the even more recent fully internationalised version), but are familiar with URLs, just think 'URL' whenever you see 'URI' below.)</p> <p>Historically, URIs were mostly seen as simply the way you accessed Web pages. These pages were hand-authored, relatively stable and simply shipped out on demand. More and more often that is no longer the case; in at least three different ways:</p> <ul> <li>Web pages for reading have been complemented by pictures for viewing, videos for watching and music for listening;</li> <li>The Web is now more than a conduit for information, it is a means to a variety of ends; we use it to <em>do</em> things: purchase goods and services, contribute to forums, play games;</li> <li>The things we access on the Web are often not hand-authored or stable, but are automatically synthesised from 'deeper' data sources on demand. Furthermore, that synthesis is increasingly influenced by aspects of the way we initiate the access.</li> </ul> <p>It is against this background that I think it is worth exploring with some care what URIs were meant to be, and how they are being used in practice. In particular, I want to look at what is to be gained from a better understanding of how other kinds of identifiers work.</p> <h2 id="The_Official_Version">The Official Version</h2> <p>Insofar as there are definitive documents about all this, they all agree that URIs are, as the third initial says, <strong>identifiers</strong>, that is, names. They identify <strong>resources</strong>, and often (although not always) allow you to access <strong>representations</strong> of those resources. (Words in <strong>bold</strong> are used as technical terms—their ordinary language meaning is in many cases likely to be more confusing than helpful.)</p> <p>'Resource' names a role in a story, not an intrinsically distinguishable subset of things, just as 'referent' does in ordinary language. Things are resources because someone created a URI to identify them, not because they have some particular properties in and of themselves.</p> <p>'Representation' names a pair: a character sequence and a media type. The <strong>media type</strong> specifies how the character string should be interpreted. For example JPG or HTML or MP3 would be likely media types for representations of an image of an apple, a news report about an orchard or a recording of a Beatles song, respectively.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article henry s. thompson apple google ietf university of edinburgh w3c wikipedia aggregation ajax algorithm browser cataloguing cookie data framework gif google maps html hypertext identifier javascript jpg metadata mp3 png rfc search technology semantic web uri url web 2.0 web app xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1589 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developing Infrastructure for Research Data Management at the University of Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author1">James A. J. Wilson</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author2">Michael A. Fraser</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author3">Luis Martinez-Uribe</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author4">Paul Jeffreys</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author5">Meriel Patrick</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author6">Asif Akram</a> and <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author7">Tahir Mansoori</a> describe the approaches taken, findings, and issues encountered while developing research data management services and infrastructure at the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><p>The University of Oxford began to consider research data management infrastructure in earnest in 2008, with the 'Scoping Digital Repository Services for Research Data' Project [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Two further JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee)-funded pilot projects followed this initial study, and the approaches taken by these projects, and their findings, form the bulk of this article.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article asif akram james a. j. wilson luis martinez-uribe meriel patrick michael a. fraser paul jeffreys tahir mansoori ahds dcc google hefce ibm jisc microsoft oxford university computing services research information network uk data archive university of east anglia university of essex university of melbourne university of oxford university of southampton datashare eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih algorithm archives bibliographic data browser cloud computing curation data data management data set database digital asset management digital curation digital repositories e-research flash framework geospatial data gis google maps ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service intellectual property interoperability j2ee jpeg metadata multimedia open access portal preservation provenance qt repositories research research information management schema search technology sharepoint software standards visualisation web 2.0 web portal xml xml schema Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1590 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Researchers across the EResearch Chasm http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wolski-richardson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/wolski-richardson#author1">Malcolm Wolski</a> and <a href="/issue65/wolski-richardson#author2">Joanna Richardson</a> outline an Australian initiative to address technology challenges within current research paradigms.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 1999 Sir John Taylor [<a href="#1">1</a>], then Director General of the UK Research Councils, talked about <em>e-Science</em>, i.e. global collaboration in key areas of science and the next generation of infrastructure that will support it. It encompasses computationally intensive science that is carried out in highly distributed network environments or that uses immense datasets that require grid computing. In the US the term <em>cyberinfrastructure</em> has been used to describe the new research environments that support advanced data acquisition, data storage, data management, data integration, data mining, data visualisation and other computing and information processing services over the Internet. In Australia—and other countries—the term <em>eResearch</em> extends e-Science and cyberinfrastructure to other disciplines, including the humanities and social sciences, and denotes the use of information technology to support existing and new forms of research.</p> <p>It is within this rapidly evolving context that the researcher of the 21st century now operates. However not all researchers are responding to changes in this new environment. In this article we will examine the current research paradigm, the main drivers for researchers to engage with this paradigm, reasons for lack of engagement, and a project undertaken at an Australian university—as part of a national initiative—to start to address the problem of making data from research activity, past and current, more discoverable and accessible.</p> <h2 id="Trends_in_the_Evolution_of_Research_Paradigms">Trends in the Evolution of Research Paradigms</h2> <p>Gray [<a href="#2">2</a>] discusses the evolution of research paradigms which has led to the increasingly important role that information technology now plays in supporting research. For thousands of years there was experimental / empirical science followed in the last few hundred years by theoretical science. The third research paradigm, which evolved in the last few decades, was characterised by increasingly complex research challenges based principally on large-scale computational simulation. This led to the concept of holistic systems of systems; the evolution from wet labs (hands-on scientific research and experimentation) to virtual labs; and an emphasis on modelling, simulation, projection and prediction.</p> <p>E-Science / cyberinfrastructure / eResearch are short-hand terms for a new fourth paradigm which is characterised by data-intensive science. The focus is on data analysis and mining; patterns discovery; and the evolution of large databases and data archives. One by-product is the so-called 'data deluge', which has led to enormous challenges in research data management. The fourth paradigm is changing the longstanding model of scholarly communication as, in the words of Clifford Lynch [<a href="#2">2</a>], 'the paper becomes a window for a scientist to not only actively understand a scientific result, but also reproduce it or extend it'. This latest paradigm is also characterised by the collaborative and multidisciplinary nature of the research being undertaken at both national and international levels.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wolski-richardson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article joanna richardson malcolm wolski cornell university griffith university iso microsoft national library of australia national science foundation oai oclc queensland university of technology accessibility archives content management creative commons data data management data mining data set data visualisation database disruptive innovation dublin core e-research e-science foaf framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata namespace national library oai-pmh ontologies open access open archives initiative open source owl preservation rae rdf repositories research resource description and access semantic web skos software standards visualisation Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1591 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk