Overview of content related to 'british library' http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/1174/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Digitisation and e-Delivery of Theses from ePrints Soton http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ball-fowler <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/ball-fowler#author1">Julian Ball</a> and <a href="/issue72/ball-fowler#author2">Christine Fowler</a> describe the partnership between the University of Southampton’s Library Digitisation Unit and its institutional repository for digitising and hosting theses.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Hartley Library at the University of Southampton has in excess of 15,000 bound PhD and MPhil theses on 340 linear metres of shelving. Consultation of the hard-copy version is now restricted to readers making a personal visit to the Library, as no further microfiche copies are being produced by the British Library and no master copies of theses are lent from the Library. Retrieval of theses from storage for readers and their subsequent return requires effort from a large number of staff.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ball-fowler" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article christine fowler julian ball abbyy british library jisc university of southampton uk theses digitisation project aggregation api archives cataloguing copyright data digitisation electronic theses eprints framework institutional repository jpeg jstor library management systems metadata oai-pmh ocr open access open archives initiative open source optical character recognition preservation repositories research search technology software url xml Tue, 30 Jul 2013 13:13:08 +0000 editor 2499 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Engaging Researchers with Social Media Tools: 25 Research Things@Huddersfield http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author1">Graham Stone</a> and <a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author2">Ellen Collins</a> investigate whether 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme, could help researchers understand the value of Web 2.0 tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article explores whether an online learning course can help academic researchers to become more familiar with social media tools, and seeks to understand how they can put them to use within their research and teaching activities. It does so by considering the development, implementation and evaluation of a pilot Web 2.0 course, 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme developed at the University of Huddersfield, which gives researchers a structured way to engage with selected Web 2.0 tools.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article ellen collins graham stone bbc blackboard british library cilip google jisc jisc collections research information network university of huddersfield citeulike myexperiment wikipedia aggregation archives blog creative commons data diigo dissemination e-learning facebook flickr framework further education google docs higher education identifier interoperability learning design learning objects librarything mashup metadata mobile phone open access podcast repositories research rss social networks software streaming tagging technorati twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress Thu, 27 Jun 2013 20:52:47 +0000 lisrw 2457 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Making Citation Work: A British Library DataCite Workshop http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a workshop on practical data citation issues for institutions, held at the British Library, London, on 8 March 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On Friday, 8 March 2013, I attended the fifth in the series of DataCite workshops run by the British Library [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The British Library Conference Centre was the venue for this workshop on the theme 'Making Citation Work: Practical Issues for Institutions'. I counted myself lucky to get a place: the organisers had had so much interest they had started a reserve list for the event.&nbsp; I could believe it as it was standing room only at one point, though an awkwardly placed pillar may have contributed to that.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report alex ball ahds badc british library california digital library datacite dcc science and technology facilities council ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of edinburgh university of exeter university of nottingham university of york open exeter api archives blog cataloguing content negotiation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital object identifier doi framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property metadata open access persistent identifier preservation repositories research schema standards url video vocabularies Tue, 09 Jul 2013 15:38:46 +0000 lisrw 2478 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information Consulting - Guide to good practice http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/white-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/white-rvw#author1">Martin White</a> reviews a book written by three experienced consultants that seeks to support information professionals in setting themselves up as consultants.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve been working in information consultancy for over 35 years and not regretted for a moment my choice of career. It’s taken me to over 30 countries and the opportunity to work with an amazing array of organisations in temperatures ranging from 47C to minus 25C. I’ve had project meetings on the top floor of the United Nations building, on a boat anchored in the harbour at Cannes, a luxury hotel in Oman and in a London convent. I’ve flown on HP’s corporate jet, had lunch with Henry Kissinger and was inside the IMF in Washington on 9/11.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/white-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review martin white british library intranet focus ltd university of sheffield bibliographic data data e-science file sharing framework information retrieval intranet research search technology Wed, 26 Jun 2013 19:57:38 +0000 lisrw 2453 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk 21st-century Scholarship and Wikipedia http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/thomas#author1">Amber Thomas</a> explores the ways in which emerging research practices and Wikipedia illustrate the changing boundaries of academic work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia, the world’s fifth most-used Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>], is a good illustration of the growing credibility of online resources. In his article in <em>Ariadne </em>earlier this year, “Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Academic Acceptance” [<a href="#2">2</a>], Brian Whalley described the debates around accuracy and review, in the context of geology.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article amber thomas bbc becta british library jisc open university orcid ukoln university of warwick jorum myexperiment wikipedia archives blog data dewey decimal e-learning framework further education google scholar higher education identifier infrastructure linked data oer open access open education open source rdf repositories research search technology semantic web smartphone software uri web 2.0 wiki Fri, 30 Nov 2012 13:18:23 +0000 lisrw 2390 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Mining the Archive: The Development of Electronic Journals http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/white#author1">Martin White</a> looks through the <em>Ariadne</em> archive to trace the development of e-journals as a particular aspect of electronic service delivery and highlights material he considers as significant.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>My career has spanned 42 years in the information business. It has encompassed 10,000-hole optical coincidence cards, online database services, videotext, laser discs, and CD-ROMs, the World Wide Web, mobile services and big data solutions. I find the historical development of information resource management absolutely fascinating, yet feel that in general it is poorly documented from an analytical perspective even though there are some excellent archives.</p> <p>These archives include the back issues of <em>Ariadne</em> from January 1996. <em>Ariadne</em> has always been one of my must-reads as a way of keeping in touch with issues and developments in e-delivery of information. The recently launched new <em>Ariadne</em> platform [<a href="#1">1</a>] has provided easier access to these archives. Looking through its content has reminded me of the skills and vision of the UK information profession as it sought to meet emerging user requirements with very limited resources.&nbsp; The archives have always been available on the <em>Ariadne</em> site but the recent update to the site and the availability of good tags on the archive content has made it much easier to mine through the archive issues.</p> <p>The <em>Ariadne</em> team, in particular Richard Waller, has given me the opportunity to mine those archives [<a href="#2">2</a>] and trace some of the developments in electronic service delivery in the UK.</p> <p>Indeed working through the archives is now probably too easy as in the preparation of this column I have found myself moving sideways from many of the feature articles to revel in the other columns that have been a feature of Ariadne. This article is a personal view of some of these developments and is in no way intended to be a definitive account. Its main purpose is to encourage others to look into the archive and learn from the experiences of the many innovators that have patiently coped with the challenges of emerging technology, resource limitations and often a distinct lack of strategy and policy at both an institutional and government level.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-white/image1-optical-coincidence-card.jpg" style="width: 171px; height: 289px;" title="Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970</strong></p> <h2 id="e-Journal_Development">e-Journal Development</h2> <p>Arriving at the University of Southampton in 1967 my main surprise was not the standard of the laboratories but the quality and scale of the Chemistry Department library. School does not prepare you for reading primary journals and how best to make use of Chemical Abstracts, but I quickly found that working in the library was much more fun than in a laboratory. I obtained an excellent result in one vacation project on physical chemistry problems by reverse engineering the problems through Chemical Abstracts! Therefore, as it turned out, I had started my career as an information scientist before I even graduated. By 1977 I was working with The Chemical Society on the micropublishing of journals and taking part in a British Library project on the future of chemical information. &nbsp;Re-reading the outcomes of that project makes me realise how difficult it is to forecast the future. Now my past has re-asserted itself to good effect as I have both the honour and excitement of being Chair of the eContent Committee of the Royal Society of Chemistry.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-white/image2-laserdiscs.jpg" style="width: 336px; height: 312px;" title="Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980</strong></p> <p>So from my standpoint, in seeking to identify distinct themes in the development of information resource management in <em>Ariadne</em>, a good place to start is with the e-markup of chemical journals. In Issue 1 Dr Henry Rzepa wrote about the potential benefits of the semantic markup of primary journals to provide chemists with access to the content of the journal article and not just to a contents page and title [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The immediate problem you face reading this admirable summary of the potential benefits of markup is that many of the hyperlinks have disappeared. History has been technologically terminated. Almost 15 years passed by before the Royal Society of Chemistry set up Project Prospect and turned semantic markup into a production process [4]. Dr Rzepa is now Professor of Computational Chemistry at Imperial College, London.</p> <p>By the mid-1990s good progress had been made in e-journal production technologies and the first e-only journals were beginning to appear. Among them was <em>Glacial Geology and Geomorphology</em> (GGG) which existed in a printed version only in as far as readers could print out a selection from it. One aim of GGG is therefore to provide the benefits of electronic transfer as well as other value added products in an accepted academic, peer-reviewed system. The author of the article describing the project [<a href="#5">5</a>] was Dr. Brian Whalley, who went on to become a Professor in the Geomaterials Research Group, Queens University of Belfast. As you will discover from <a href="../author/brian-whalley-author-profile">his author profile</a> (another <em>Ariadne</em> innovation), Brian is still active though retired from formal education. What struck me about this article was the author’s vision in January 1996 of how e-journals could be of benefit in university teaching.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article martin white andrew w mellon foundation british library hefce imperial college london institute of physics intranet focus ltd jisc mimas portico stm ukoln university of glasgow university of manchester university of sheffield university of southampton jisc information environment accessibility archives big data blog content management copyright database ebook ejournal higher education intellectual property jstor licence mobile open access research resource management search technology standards Thu, 06 Dec 2012 15:50:18 +0000 lisrw 2401 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk CURATEcamp iPres 2012 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt#author1">Mark Jordan</a>, <a href="/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt#author2">Courtney Mumma</a>, <a href="/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt#author3">Nick Ruest</a> and the participants of CURATEcamp iPres 2012 report on this unconference for digital curation practitioners and researchers, held on 2 October 2012 in Toronto.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CURATEcamp is ‘A series of unconference-style events focused on connecting practitioners and technologists interested in digital curation.’ [<a href="#1">1</a>] The first CURATEcamp was held in the summer of 2010, and there have been just over 10 Camps since then.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report courtney mumma mark jordan nick ruest british library library of congress ndsa premis simon fraser university york university apache archives blog cloud computing curation data digital curation digital preservation digital repositories dissemination ebook file format google docs hashtag identifier infrastructure linux metadata open source operating system preservation programming language python repositories software standards taxonomy twitter vocabularies Thu, 13 Dec 2012 12:21:18 +0000 lisrw 2409 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Launching a New Community-owned Content Service http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/milloy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/milloy#author1">Caren Milloy</a> describes some of the challenges overcome and lessons learned by JISC Collections during the development of JISC eCollections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>JISC eCollections is a set of e-resource platforms launched in November 2011 by JISC Collections, in partnership with the JISC data centres EDINA and Mimas. The platforms (Figure 1) are JISC MediaHub, JISC Historic Books and JISC Journal Archives; together, they are intended to provide a sustainable, value-for-money alternative to accessing licensed content on publisher platforms, by consolidating and hosting the broad range of historical book, journal archive and multimedia content purchased by JISC Collections on behalf of the UK education community. The vision is to provide a world-class collection that ensures users’ broadest information needs are well met, and to work in partnership with the community to improve and develop the platforms around evolving student and researcher expectations.</p> <h2 id="Background">Background</h2> <p>The primary role of JISC Collections is the licensing of content on behalf of its UK Higher Education (HE) and Further Education (FE) member organisations. Over the last 10 years, JISC Collections has invested over £40 million in centralised licensing of digital content, in perpetuity, on behalf of all its members. The first agreement was signed in 2002 for ProQuest’s Early English Books Online (EEBO). Since then, national licences have been negotiated for historic books, journal archives and multimedia content (Figure 1), such as documentaries and educational films. In 2010, JISC Collections invested a further £2.5 million in film and image content, representing UK and world history since 1987, specially selected for teaching and learning. The majority of JISC Collections’ member organisations would be unable to afford per-institution subscriptions to these book, journal and multimedia collections, so centralised licensing is critical to broadening access.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue69-milloy/fig1-jec-platforms.png" style="width: 680px; height: 213px;" title="Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service</strong></p> <h2 id="Why_Develop_JISC_eCollections">Why Develop JISC eCollections?</h2> <p>The platforms contain more than 4.5 million resources from over 20 providers. JISC Collections members were previously required to access this content via a range of separate services, each with different user interfaces and administrative requirements, and with a complex funding set-up including both JISC subsidies and publisher access fees payable by each institution. JISC Collections felt that its existing – and future – investments in content would best be protected and preserved by developing an independent service, as an affordable alternative to relying on content providers for access to perpetually licensed content. Such a service would allow the education community to take ownership of its acquisitions and assure it of future control. In 2011 each group of resources was consolidated into one platform to increase discoverability, simplify the user experience (making it more inclusive to users at all academic levels), reduce the administrative burden, and thereby enable maximum value to be derived from the initial content investments.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/milloy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article caren milloy british library edina google jisc jisc collections middlesex university mimas research information network ubird aggregation archives cataloguing data data mining database ebook further education graphics higher education licence marc metadata multimedia ocr open access optical character recognition passwords portfolio preservation provenance research resource discovery schema search technology Sat, 28 Jul 2012 16:36:05 +0000 lisrw 2356 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The Second British Library DataCite Workshop http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/datacite-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/datacite-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a one-day workshop on metadata supporting the citation of research data, held at the British Library, London, on 6 July 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On Friday, 6 July 2012 I made my way to the British Library Conference Centre for the second in a series of DataCite workshops [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The theme was <em>Describe, Disseminate, Discover: Metadata for Effective Data Citation</em>. In welcoming us to the event, <strong>Lee-Ann Coleman</strong>, Head of Scientific, Technical and Medical Information at the British Library, said there had been some doubt as to whether anyone would turn up to an event about metadata, but as it happened there were 36 of us, drawn from across the UK and beyond.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/datacite-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report alex ball british library datacite dcc iso oais science and technology facilities council ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of oxford apache application profile archives cataloguing content management data data citation data management data set database digital curation doi dublin core foaf identifier infrastructure intellectual property marc metadata ontologies portal preservation prism rdf repositories research schema software standards url Sun, 29 Jul 2012 18:54:47 +0000 lisrw 2366 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: I, Digital – A History Devoid of the Personal? http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rusbridge-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/rusbridge-rvw#author1">Chris Rusbridge</a> reviews an edited volume that aims to fill a gap in ‘literature designed specifically to guide archivists’ thinking about personal digital materials’.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We are all too familiar with the dire predictions of coming Digital Dark Ages, when All Shall be Lost because of the fragility of our digital files and the transience of the formats. We forget, of course, that loss was always the norm. The wonderful documents in papyrus, parchment and paper that we so admire and wonder at, are the few lucky survivors of their times. Sometimes they have been carefully nurtured, sometimes they have been accidentally preserved. But almost all were lost!</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rusbridge-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review chris rusbridge british library dcc jisc national library of australia university of glasgow university of oxford university of virginia elib wikipedia archives bibliographic data curation data digital library digital preservation digital repositories ebook facebook internet explorer mis preservation privacy repositories research social web twitter web services wordpress youtube Sun, 29 Jul 2012 18:17:27 +0000 lisrw 2365 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Data Citation and Publication by NERC’s Environmental Data Centres http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/callaghan-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/callaghan-et-al#author1">Sarah Callaghan</a>, <a href="/issue68/callaghan-et-al#author2">Roy Lowry</a>, <a href="/issue68/callaghan-et-al#author3">David Walton</a> and members of the Natural Environment Research Council Science Information Strategy Data Citation and Publication Project team describe their work in NERC’s Environmental Data Centres.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Data are the foundation upon which scientific progress rests. Historically speaking, data were a scarce resource, but one which was (relatively) easy to publish in hard copy, as tables or graphs in journal papers. With modern scientific methods, and the increased ease in collecting and analysing vast quantities of data, there arises a corresponding difficulty in publishing this data in a form that can be considered part of the scientific record.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/callaghan-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article david walton roy lowry sarah callaghan badc british antarctic survey british library british oceanographic data centre codata datacite jisc ncas royal meteorological society science and technology facilities council claddier ojims archives ascii cataloguing cd-rom curation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital repositories doi dspace dublin core e-science framework geospatial data google scholar guid higher education html identifier infrastructure internet explorer interoperability library data metadata open access rdf repositories research schema standards uri url vocabularies xml Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2223 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Peculiarities of Digitising Materials from the Collections of the National Academy of Sciences, Armenia http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/hopkinson-zargaryan <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/hopkinson-zargaryan#author1">Alan Hopkinson</a> and <a href="/issue68/hopkinson-zargaryan#author2">Tigran Zargaryan</a> give an overview of their experience of digitising paper-based materials in the Fundamental Scientific Library of the National Academy of Sciences, Armenia including some of the obstacles encountered during image processing and optical character recognition.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>Early writing which first appeared as cuneiform protocols and then emerged in manuscript form and as printed materials is currently entering a new stage in its development – in the form of electronic publications.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/hopkinson-zargaryan" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article alan hopkinson tigran zargaryan abbyy british library eifl ifla jisc digital media microsoft middlesex university national academy of sciences national library of armenia stm tasi endangered archives programme adobe algorithm archives content management data database dcmi digital media digital repositories digitisation document format drupal dspace dublin core dublin core metadata initiative dvd eprints file format graphics infrastructure jpeg metadata national library ocr open access open source open standard optical character recognition preservation repositories research resource description schema software standards tiff Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2235 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 68 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/editorial2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/editorial2#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> issue 68.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I am pleased to introduce you to the content of Issue 68, and to have the opportunity to remind you that you have a far larger number of channels into the publication’s content.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/editorial2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 editorial richard waller british library jisc massachusetts institute of technology national academy of sciences royal holloway sakai clif depositmo hydra opendoar repositories support project rsp aggregation archives blog cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data data citation data set digital repositories digitisation dissemination doi eprints facebook fedora commons foi framework higher education ict identifier information retrieval instant messaging institutional repository library management systems lucene metadata ms word multimedia ocr oer opac open source openurl preservation repositories research resource description resource discovery rss search technology second life sfx sharepoint software solr standardisation sword protocol taxonomy twitter vufind web 2.0 wordpress xml Mon, 12 Mar 2012 15:17:06 +0000 lisrw 2322 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The Future of the Past of the Web http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/fpw11-rpt#author1">Matthew Brack</a> reports on the one-day international workshop 'The Future of the Past of the Web' held at the British Library Conference Centre, London on 7 October, 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We have all heard at least some of the extraordinary statistics that attempt to capture the sheer size and ephemeral nature of the Web. According to the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), more than 70 new domains are registered and more than 500,000 documents are added to the Web every minute [<a href="#1">1</a>]. This scale, coupled with its ever-evolving use, present significant challenges to those concerned with preserving both the content and context of the Web.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report matthew brack bbc british library bsi dcc digital preservation coalition google hanzo archives institute of historical research iso jisc kings college london library of congress nhs oxford internet institute the national archives university of oxford university of sheffield wellcome library arcomem internet archive memento uk government web archive aggregation algorithm api archives big data blog browser cache curation data data mining data model digital asset management digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi flickr identifier interoperability library data lod metadata preservation repositories research search technology social web software tag cloud twitter ulcc uri url visualisation warc wayback machine web resources wordpress youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 12:06:52 +0000 lisrw 2236 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk IMPACT Final Conference 2011 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/impact-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/impact-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the two-day conference looking at the results of the IMPACT Project in making digitisation and OCR better, faster and cheaper.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The IMPACT Project (<strong>Imp</strong>roving <strong>Ac</strong>cess to <strong>T</strong>ext) [<a href="#1">1</a>] was funded by the European Commission back in 2007 to look at significantly advancing access to historical text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) methods. As the project reaches its conclusion, one of its key objectives is sharing project outputs.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/impact-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report marieke guy abbyy austrian national library bnf brightsolid british library california digital library content conversion specialists d-lib magazine dcc google ibm institute for dutch lexicology national and university library of slovenia national library of finland national library of the netherlands stanford university tufts university ukoln university of bath university of munich university of oxford university of salford university of utrecht ahlib europeana impact project archives blog copyright data data management data mining data set database digital library digitisation dissemination finereader framework google books ict information retrieval information society interoperability metadata mets national library ocr oer open source optical character recognition preservation research search technology software solr tagging tesseract twitter unicode wiki wordpress Sun, 26 Feb 2012 13:36:33 +0000 lisrw 2233 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) Project Launch Conference http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/lis-rc-dream-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/lis-rc-dream-rpt#author1">Ray Harper</a> reports on a one-day conference which launched the DREaM Project, held by the Library and Information Science Research Coalition in London on 19 July 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The DREaM (Developing Research Excellence and Methods) Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held at the British Library Conference Centre in London in July 2011. The conference was attended by 86 delegates, and consisted of an overview of the DREaM Project, two keynote papers, a one-minute madness session, and four parallel breakout sessions. I had the opportunity to attend as a sponsored delegate, thanks to Glen Recruitment, Sue Hill Recruitment and TFPL.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/lis-rc-dream-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report ray harper american library association bbc british library cilip edinburgh napier university imperial college london indiana university information today loughborough university nhs northumbria university university college cork university of cambridge university of oxford university of sheffield lis research coalition blog cookie data dissemination framework information society knowledge management metadata open access repositories research search technology social networks taxonomy Mon, 27 Feb 2012 16:59:05 +0000 lisrw 2237 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk DataCite UK User Group Meeting http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on the 2nd UK User Group meeting for DataCite, held at the British Library in London, in April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="top" id="top"></a></p> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>DataCite [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an international not-for-profit organisation dedicated to making research data a normal, citable part of the scientific record. It is made up of a membership of 15 major libraries and data centres, which, along with four associate members, represent 11 different countries across four continents. The approach taken by DataCite currently centres on assigning Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to datasets; it is a member of the International DOI Foundation and one of a handful of DOI registration agencies.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report alex ball badc british library d-lib magazine datacite dcc google mimas orcid science and technology facilities council uk data archive ukoln university of bath university of birmingham university of leicester university of oxford erim fishnet sagecite accessibility api archives bibliographic data cataloguing curation data data set digital curation digital preservation doi framework guid higher education identifier metadata national library open data preservation repositories research schema usability web resources Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1627 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Envisioning Future Academic Library Services http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews a timely collection of essays that highlights the values of institutional leadership and resourcefulness in academic librarianship's engagements with Web 2.0.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Since networked information technology has initiated a breathtaking transformation of knowledge practices, librarians have had a generous supply of thought leaders whose lifetime experience has permitted them to issue credible translations of the 'writing on the wall'. Recently, however, there seems to be many more analysts (and soothsayers) and much more anxious observation and published interpretation of such writing. And the message comes in a red ink, in bold, and with distinct portent, when not downright ominous.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review john azzolini british library clifford chance google university of melbourne yale university bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright curation data data management data set digital library digitisation disruptive innovation dissemination ebook framework higher education ict knowledge management mobile muves open access personalisation preservation research search technology second life web 2.0 Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1632 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 66: Sanity Check http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 66.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With institutions searching to increase the impact of the work they do, and conscious of the immediate impact of any event they organise, many will be interested to read of <a href="/issue66/guy/">10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event</a> in which <strong>Marieke Guy</strong> provides a raft of suggestions to enhance the participants' experience of and involvement in, the event they are attending.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 editorial richard waller british library google jisc ukoln university of pretoria e-curator keepit zetoc aggregation archives blog browser copyright curation data database digital audio digital preservation digital repositories file format flickr framework geospatial data gis identifier institutional repository learning objects metadata mobile mobile phone netvibes open access open source personalisation podcast preservation privacy refworks repositories research resource description and access rss search technology software streaming tagging twitter usability video web 2.0 web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1602 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Turning Off Tap Into Bath http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/chapman <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/chapman#author1">Ann Chapman</a> describes the lifecycle of a demonstrator database and the development of a preservation policy for its content and software.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/chapman" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article ann chapman british library jisc mla ukoln university of bath application profile archives cataloguing collection description data database digitisation dublin core dvd lcsh metadata mysql open source passwords preservation research resource discovery resource management rslp schema search technology software url Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1604 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Saving the Sounds of the UK in the UK SoundMap http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/pennock-clark <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/pennock-clark#author1">Maureen Pennock</a> and <a href="/issue66/pennock-clark#author2">Chris Clark</a> introduce an innovative initiative from the British Library to map a 12-month soundscape of the UK.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3, being the digitally edited version now with normalised text 2011-02-19-20-46 REW --><!-- v3, being the digitally edited version now with normalised text 2011-02-19-20-46 REW --><p>The impact of the digital age upon libraries has been profound, changing not only the back office, services, and the range of materials available to users, but also the public face of libraries and the relationship between the library and its users. Within this changed relationship, collaboration, participation, and online social networks play an increasingly important role in the user experience, especially in large university and national libraries. At the same time, a shift is taking place in the type of collection items held in libraries, and the percentage of born-digital materials acquired is increasing on a daily basis.</p> <p>The British Library is no exception, making use of a wide range of online services and tools to engage with users and enhance access to the collections, both digitised and born-digital. Numerous initiatives are currently taking place across the Library to engage with users and address these changes, and one in particular has sought to capitalise on both the increase in participatory networks and the opportunities afforded by born-digital material. This initiative is the <em>UK SoundMap</em>, an online crowd-sourcing activity driven by the British Library in partnership with the Noise Futures Network to engage and build the community in development of a new born-digital audio-visual research resource [<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <h2 id="Unlocking_and_Integrating_Audio-Visual_Content_at_the_British_Library">Unlocking and Integrating Audio-Visual Content at the British Library</h2> <p>The UK SoundMap is being carried out as part of a wider project by the British Library's Sound &amp; Vision Department: Unlocking &amp; Integrating Audio Visual Content (UIAVC). The UIAVC project seeks to address changing user needs in a multi-media research environment by establishing the building blocks for a redefined and integrated sound and moving image service within the Library. Other, complementary initiatives in the project include:</p> <ul> <li>Modernising and enhancing interactive features in the existing Archival Sound Recordings (ASR) portal, which currently provides access to over 45,000 selected recordings of music, spoken word, and human and natural environments [<a href="#3">3</a>].</li> <li>Establishing a New Music Network to select and capture content from musicians whose work is produced outside the usual commercial channels</li> <li>Exploring and piloting new R&amp;D Tools to improve resource discovery through new search and analysis tools for speech and music [<a href="#4">4</a>]</li> <li>Increasing the amount of digital audio and video content accessible to users at the Library (i.e. onsite), and remotely</li> </ul> <p>Overall, the project is key to meeting the Library's audio-visual strategy, which aims to unlock and integrate audio-visual content across the library according to user needs. The initiatives interrelate to a significant degree as they each follow the content path from acquisition to curation to integrated delivery. They each focus on digital content (both born-digital and digitised analogue content), they embrace both onsite and remote (Web) access, and collectively they express the commitment the Library now has towards integrating audio-visual media within the research experience.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/pennock-clark" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article chris clark maureen pennock british library google android archives browser copyright curation data data set digital audio flac geospatial data gis google maps iphone metadata mobile mobile phone mp3 portal preservation privacy research resource discovery rss search technology sms social networks twitter video Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1609 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk 10 Years of Zetoc http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/ronson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/ronson#author1">Jane Ronson</a> looks at how Zetoc has developed and what the future holds for the service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Now celebrating its 10th anniversary, Zetoc [<a href="#1">1</a>] provides quality-assured, comprehensive journal table of contents data for resource discovery that users can search and have delivered straight to their in-box or desktop. In a nutshell, Zetoc is all about convenience, current awareness and comprehensive coverage. In a recent survey, one academic commented: 'This is a "one-stop shop" for relevant literature'. What is Zetoc, what has it achieved and where is it going? In this article I will look at the history of the service and how it has developed over the past decade.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/ronson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article jane ronson british library google harvard university heriot-watt university hewlett-packard jisc loughborough university mimas national library of wales nhs sconul stanford university university of chester university of manchester university of surrey dner my references suncat tictocs zetoc aggregation authentication bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing copac data database further education google scholar higher education identifier national library open access openurl personalisation repositories research resource discovery rss search technology shibboleth soap software sru tag cloud z39.50 Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1610 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk CIG Conference 2010: Changes in Cataloguing in 'Interesting Times' http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/cig-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/cig-2010-rpt#author1">Rhiannon McLoughlin</a> reports on a three-day conference on cataloguing in a time of financial stringency, held by the CILIP Cataloguing and Indexing Group at Exeter University, from 13-15 September 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The focus of this conference was initiatives to get through the current economic climate. Cataloguing departments are under threat of cutbacks as never before. Papers on streamlining, collaborative enterprises, shared catalogues and services, recycling and repurposing of content using metadata extraction techniques combined to give a flavour of the new thrift driving management. The continuing progress of the long awaited Resource Description and Access (RDA)[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>] towards becoming the new international cataloguing standard was another hot topic.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/cig-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report rhiannon mcloughlin british library british museum cilip google ifla jisc leeds metropolitan university library of congress mla research information network sconul ukoln university of aberdeen university of exeter university of leeds university of strathclyde university of warwick aacr2 aggregation archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cidoc-crm crm data data management digital repositories digitisation ebook frbr google search higher education lcsh learning object metadata learning objects lom marc marc21 metadata ontologies open data open source repositories research resource description and access resource discovery resource sharing schema search technology semantic web software standards vle wiki xml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1595 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Internet Librarian International Conference 2010 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author1">Claire Tylee</a>, <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author2">Katrin Flemming</a> and <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author3">Elly Cope</a> report on the two-day Internet Librarian International Conference focusing on innovation and technology in the information profession, held in London on 14-15 October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Thursday_14_October">Thursday 14 October</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value">Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><h2 id="Thursday_14_October"><a id="thursday" name="thursday"></a>Thursday 14 October</h2> <h2 id="Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value"><a id="thursday-track-a" name="thursday-track-a"></a>Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</h2> <h3 id="A102:_Future_of_Academic_Libraries"><a id="a102" name="a102"></a>A102: Future of Academic Libraries</h3> <h4 id="Mal_Booth_University_of_Technology_Sydney_Australia">Mal Booth, University of Technology Sydney (Australia)</h4> <h4 id="Michael_Jubb_Research_Information_Network_UK">Michael Jubb, Research Information Network (UK)</h4> <p>Mal Booth from the University of Technology Sydney started the session by giving an insight into current plans and projects underway to inform a new library building due to open in 2015 as part of a major redeveloped city campus.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report claire tylee elly cope katrin flemming amazon british library cornell university edina google iso jisc mimas open university portico research information network university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of manchester peprs wikipedia zetoc android archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing content management copyright curation data database digital library digitisation dissemination ejournal facebook flickr frbr higher education identifier infrastructure iphone library data library management systems licence linked data mac os marc mashup metadata microblogging mobile opac open access open source pode preservation qr code research rfid rss search technology semantic web software standards tagging twitter video web 2.0 web browser web portal wiki wordpress youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1596 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Introductory Concepts in Information Science http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/oppenheim-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/oppenheim-rvw#author1">Charles Oppenheim</a> takes a look at an introduction to Information Science but fails to be impressed.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With a title like that, one would expect a primer, introducing all the key concepts of information science to someone studying the topic for the first time at undergraduate or Masters' level, and possibly for the interested layman. Such a book would be a worthy successor to Chris Hanson's <em>Introduction to Science Information Work</em>, and Roger Meetham's <em>Information Retrieval</em>, both of which were first published about 40 years ago. Sadly, however, this book does not fulfil the promise of its title.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/oppenheim-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review charles oppenheim british library british museum google loughborough university accessibility bibliometrics copyright digital library digital repositories information retrieval open access repositories research resource management software url Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1598 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Software Comparison: Building Digital Library Infrastructure at LSE http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/fay <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/fay#author1">Ed Fay</a> presents a comparison of repository software that was carried out at LSE in support of digital library infrastructure development.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/fay" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article ed fay british library d-lib magazine london school of economics oai oais university of york wellcome library safir access control aggregation api archives authentication authentication service blog cataloguing content management data data management data model database digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dspace eprints fedora commons geospatial data gis identifier infrastructure institutional repository ldap library management systems linked data metadata mobile multimedia national library open access open source persistent identifier preservation preservation metadata repositories research schema search technology shibboleth software standards twitter uri video vle web app xacml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1560 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Public Library 2.0: Culture Change? http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/hammond <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/hammond#author1">Sarah Hammond</a> explores UK public libraries' growing participation in social media to reach their audiences online, with a focus on blogging.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Beginning in the mid 2000s I began keeping an eye on how libraries have been getting involved with social software - I started this haphazardly just out of interest but then I started to be more systematic when I needed to explore online resources for my organisation, the National Railway Museum. When I left to pursue my MA in Librarianship at the University of Sheffield I took the opportunity to do some serious research into the subject with a focus on UK public libraries as it seemed to me that they were hugely under-represented online.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/hammond" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article sarah hammond bbc british library information today nhs oxford university press robert gordon university university of oxford university of sheffield university of the west of england archives blog doi facebook flickr framework higher education librarything microblogging mobile netvibes opac podcast research search technology social software software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1562 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Trove: Innovation in Access to Information in Australia http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/holley#author1">Rose Holley</a> describes a major development in the Australian national digital information infrastructure.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In late 2009 the National Library of Australia released version 1 of Trove [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the public. Trove is a free search engine. It searches across a large aggregation of Australian content. The treasure is over 90 million items from over 1000 libraries, museums, archives and other organisations which can be found at the click of a button. Finding information just got easier for many Australians. Exploring a wealth of resources and digital content like never before, including full-text books, journals and newspaper articles, images, music, sound, video, maps, Web sites, diaries, letters, archives, people and organisations has been an exciting adventure for users and the service has been heavily used. Finding and retrieving instantly information in context; interacting with content and social engagement are core features of the service. This article describes Trove features, usage, content building, and its applications for contributors and users in the national context.</p> <h2 id="Opportunities_for_Libraries">Opportunities for Libraries</h2> <p>I see tremendous opportunities for libraries this year because of advances in technology. The changes in technology mean that anyone can create, describe or recommend content, which means that many people and organisations are becoming librarians or libraries in their own way. Librarians should not be threatened or dismayed by this but rather encouraged, since it means that society is retaining its ongoing interest in the creation, organisation and dissemination of content, and we have an integral role to play in these developments. Libraries and librarians are relevant more than ever in this environment because we have vast amounts of data and information to share, a huge amount of information expertise, and an understanding of how technology can assist us in making information more accessible.</p> <p>We need to have new ideas and re-examine our old ideas to see how technology can help us. What things have we always wanted to do that we couldn't before, like providing a single point of access to all Australian information? Is this still pie in the sky or can we now achieve it? Libraries need to think big. As Charles Leadbeater would say 'Libraries need to think they are leading a mass movement, not just serving a clientele.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] Librarians are often thought of as gatekeepers with the emphasis being on closed access, but technology enables gatekeepers to open doors as well as close them and this is the opportunity I see. However many institutions will need to change their strategic thinking from control/shut to free/open before they can make this transition, and take a large dose of courage as well. The American author Harriet Rubin says, 'Freedom is actually a bigger game than power. Power is about what you can control. Freedom is about what you can unleash.' [<a href="#3">3</a>] The National Library of Australia already took this step forward in 2008 with the advent of the Australian Newspapers beta service, which opened up the raw text of digitised Australian newspapers to the public for improvement, without moderation on a mass scale [<a href="#4">4</a>]. With a long history of collaboration across the Australian cultural heritage sector [<a href="#5">5</a>] with regard to digitisation, storage, and service delivery, the National Library of Australia is well placed to take the lead with innovation in access to information.</p> <p>Some people may say, 'But isn't Google doing that, so why do we still need libraries?' There is no question in my mind that libraries are fundamentally different from Google and other similar services. Libraries are different to Google for these reasons: they commit to provide long-term preservation, curation and access to their content; they have no commercial motives in the provision of information (deemed by various library acts); they aim for universal access to everyone in society; and they are 'free for all'. To summarise: libraries are always and forever. Who can say that of a search engine, or of any commercial organisation, regardless of size?</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article rose holley amazon british library google national library of australia oai open library wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data bibliographic database browser copyright curation data database digitisation dissemination doc dublin core facebook flickr ftp google books identifier infrastructure lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh ocr open archives initiative persistent identifier preservation research resource sharing rss search technology tagging twitter usability video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1563 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Intute Reflections at the End of an Era http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author1">Angela Joyce</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author2">Linda Kerr</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author3">Tim Machin</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author4">Paul Meehan</a> and <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author5">Caroline Williams</a> look back at the history and achievements of Intute, and reflect on lessons learned as the service enters its final year.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article angela joyce caroline williams linda kerr paul meehan tim machin ahrc bbc british library google hea heriot-watt university intute jisc linden lab mimas ukoln university of bristol university of glamorgan university of huddersfield university of manchester university of oxford wellcome trust automatic metadata generation eevl elib jisc information environment mobile internet detective sosig wikipedia blog cataloguing curation data database digitisation dissemination google scholar higher education metadata mobile personalisation research resource discovery search technology second life software tagging twitter vim vocabularies web 2.0 web browser web resources widget Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1564 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Blue Ribbon Task Force Symposium on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/blue-ribbon-uk-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/blue-ribbon-uk-2010-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on a symposium which provided an opportunity for stakeholders to respond to the recent Blue Ribbon Task Force report on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On Thursday 6 May 2010 an historic event took place. The event allowed people to express their opinions on potential future action in a highly significant area. No, not the British general election, and I'm sure the concurrence of dates was unintentional! This event was the Blue Ribbon Task Force Symposium on sustainable digital preservation and access, held at the Wellcome Collection Conference Centre in London [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/blue-ribbon-uk-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report marieke guy bbc british library cni coalition for networked information datacite dcc iso jisc oclc open planets foundation uk data archive ukoln university college london university of bath university of essex beginners guide to digital preservation europeana archives blog copyright creative commons curation data data set digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dublin core fedora commons framework infrastructure national library open access open source preservation research software video Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1570 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Evidence, Value and Impact: The LIS Research Landscape in 2010 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/lisrc10-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/lisrc10-rpt#author1">Stephanie Kenna</a> reports on the Library and Information Science Research Coalition conference, held at the British Library on 28 June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Having been involved in developing the concept of a coalition for research in Library and Information Science (LIS) since 2006, it was with both pride and excitement that I took my place in the British Library's auditorium on Monday 28 June. There was a buzz of anticipation. We were not disappointed.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/lisrc10-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report stephanie kenna british library cilip edinburgh napier university jisc loughborough university mla research information network university college london lis research coalition archives blog data e-learning framework higher education information architecture information retrieval iphone research search technology twitter usability video wiki Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1572 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Making Datasets Visible and Accessible: DataCite's First Summer Meeting http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt#author1">Tom J Pollard</a> and <a href="/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt#author2">J Max Wilkinson</a> report on DataCite's First Summer Meeting, a two-day event focused on making datasets visible and accessible, held in Hannover, Germany, in June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report j max wilkinson tom pollard british library datacite elsevier harvard university microsoft open planets foundation university of the west of england ddi archives blog browser cataloguing copyright creative commons curation data data citation data management data mining data set digital repositories doi e-research facebook foi framework graphics infrastructure interoperability java mashup metadata open access open source portal privacy repositories research search technology standards syndication visualisation vocabularies Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1574 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk E-books and E-content 2010: Data As Content http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/ebooks-ucl-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/ebooks-ucl-2010-rpt#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reports on a meeting dealing with academic data management and some JISC projects concerned with institutional responses to the need to manage research data more effectively.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/ebooks-ucl-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report brian whalley british library datacite google jisc queens university belfast research information network serials solutions university college london university of manchester university of oxford university of southampton peg-board sudamih archives cloud computing data data citation data management data mining data set database doi ebook eprints fedora commons flash foi framework google scholar higher education identifier information retrieval infrastructure metadata mp3 multimedia national library ogg preservation rdf repositories research resource description search technology semantic web sparql streaming text mining video Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1577 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Access, Delivery, Performance - The Future of Libraries Without Walls http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews a Festschrift celebrating the work of Professor Peter Brophy, founder of the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It is normal in some subject disciplines to publish volumes of edited papers in honour of a respected colleague, usually to mark a significant birthday or career change. The contributors to such Festschriften<a href="#editors-note">*</a> are usually made up of former colleagues or pupils of the person being honoured. This volume celebrates the work of Professor Peter Brophy, the founder of the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management (CERLIM), which since 1998 has been based at the Manchester Metropolitan University. This volume contains twelve chapters written by sixteen contributors, many of them colleagues or ex-colleagues of Professor Brophy.</p> <p>Peter Brophy has had an outstanding career both as a librarian and researcher. Alan MacDougall, Visiting Professor at Manchester Metropolitan University provides an outline in the opening chapter. A career that started at the Library Research Unit at Lancaster University in the early 1970s progressed to professional posts at Strathclyde University and Teeside Polytechnic, before Brophy eventually became Librarian at Bristol Polytechnic. From there, he moved to the University of Central Lancashire in 1989, where in 1993 he set up CERLIM. A selected bibliography of works by Professor Brophy fills eleven pages at the end of the volume, revealing the range and diversity of his research interests over the past few decades.</p> <p>The contexts of the early years of Professor Brophy's career are sketched in more detail in the opening chapter by Michael Buckland, Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. Buckland was a colleague of Brophy's at the Library Research Unit at Lancaster in the early 1970s.This chapter gives a good flavour of how library and information research was undertaken in this time when the libraries at what were then 'new universities' had an active interest in innovation and when almost all library research in the UK was funded by the Office for Scientific and Technical Information of the Department of Education and Science.</p> <h2 id="Libraries_and_e-Learning">Libraries and e-Learning</h2> <p>The remainder of the book is organised into four broad themes. The first covers libraries' role in supporting e-learning. The opening chapter in this section is by Gill Needham and Nicky Whitsed of the Open University. It is a series of reflections on a decade of developing library services for distance learners. Starting with the Follett Report of 1993 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the chapter identifies three main phases in the Open University's approach to delivering services to around 200,000 students and 8,000 tutors. The first phase was concerned with fairness; knowing exactly when to introduce online services at a time when a majority of Open University students did not have access to the relevant technologies or skills and when many tutors were reluctant to change their traditional ways of working. Responses to this included the development of library-mediated collections of quality-controlled Internet resources, supplemented by an online skills tutorial focused on generic information skills. Despite all of this, actual use of online resources remained relatively low (p. 30). The second phase, therefore, was mainly about integrating online services more deeply into the core learning activities of courses. The focus switched to the training of tutors and the integration of information resources within the university's emerging virtual learning environment (VLE), based on Moodle. In the interim, a pilot project using the open source MyLibrary software was found to be useful in helping to integrate library services into the learning experiences of individual students. The third phase - which Needham and Whitsed note is still ongoing - concerns the embedding of information literacy and resource-based learning concepts within the university more widely. The chapter ends with some comments on the, perhaps inevitable, tension between the 'invisible library' – 'quietly and strategically … [insinuating] resources and services into all those places where they have the most impact' - and the need to defend library budgets and status within the wider institution (pp. 35-36).</p> <p>The following chapter, by Professor David Baker of the University College Plymouth St Mark and St John, is a general overview of the development of e-learning technologies in UK Higher Education over the past decade. Starting again with Follett, Baker explains how e-learning concepts and technologies have been taken up, focusing in particular on the facilitating role taken by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) in providing a national-level approach to the provision of both infrastructure (e.g., networks, access management tools) and content. In addition, the chapter refers to a number of JISC-funded programmes and initiatives focused on breaking down the barriers that prevent the sharing and re-use of e-learning content. The final sections look at some wider factors influencing the current transformation of learning, teaching and assessment practices. These include the need to integrate institutional services like VLEs with the generic social networking tools and mobile devices familiar to new generations of learners. However, successful integration is not just a matter of technology but of overcoming cultural differences. Baker uses a synthesis of the JISC-funded Learner Experiences of e-Learning projects [<a href="#2">2</a>] to note that there might have been 'an increasing "divide" between the needs, expectations and wishes of the learners and the expectations of the teachers, who were more "traditional" and perhaps not engaged with e-learning in the same way' (p. 49).</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review michael day british library cerlim google jisc manchester metropolitan university mla open university oreilly rnib talis ukoln university of bath university of brighton university of california berkeley university of central lancashire victoria university w3c jisc information environment web accessibility initiative accessibility archives bibliographic data cataloguing controlled vocabularies digital library e-learning facebook flickr framework higher education infrastructure knowledge management metadata mobile moodle open source preservation repositories research semantic web software vle vocabularies wcag web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1580 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Don't You Know Who I Am? http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paschoud <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/paschoud#author1">John Paschoud</a> looks into identity and access management in the pre-digital and digital age, and describes how the JISC Identity Management Toolkit can help us manage identities better.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Way back in prehistory, when libraries were buildings with books in, identity management was a pretty simple challenge for them. A library was either truly 'public', in which case you did not care who came in (the more people, the more popular you were, which was 'a good thing'). Otherwise, you had to be a member, and the security officer on the door knew your face, or you could show him (it was usually a 'him', then) a card or something to prove you were a member.</p> <p>For a library to trust you to take some of its books away with you (without hiding them under your coat), you usually did have to be a member, and becoming a member entailed some sort of registration process in which you might have to prove who you were with some official-looking document. The details of each member could be recorded in some sort of register, and a card issued. Effectively taking someone's membership away again, for whatever reason, was a bit more difficult - unless there was an opportunity to wrest the precious library card from them physically!</p> <h2 id="Admissions_Rules">Admissions Rules</h2> <p>A few years ago now our Projects Team at the London School of Economics (LSE) Library [<a href="#1">1</a>] was involved in documenting and analysing the admissions rules of academic libraries in London. This was before our own library agreed to provide full access to 'the general public' (in return for Heritage Lottery grants towards a £20m building project), but I was intrigued to find that our own admissions rules included all sorts of bipartite agreements with institutions such as Kings College London (proximity, I guess) and the School of Oriental and African Studies (a lot of common-interest post-colonial subject material in each of our collections).</p> <p>The most interesting 'right of access' I found in our admissions rules was 'accredited diplomatic staff of a recognised foreign country, attached to an embassy, consulate or diplomatic mission in London'. I never actually observed anyone trying to exercise this particular right (I am excused counter duties at the library because I do not know enough about books), but I was aware that my colleagues who did serve on the Admissions Desk rota were a wonderfully diverse lot; with collectively far more knowledge of international and political affairs than this duty required. I imagined the possible scene of an intending visitor from some small state (in some dispute with the United Nations, perhaps) being rebuffed by one of our Library Assistants because he was not accredited by a <em>recognised</em> foreign country. I am sure all our LAs are much too diplomatic themselves for anything like that to actually happen now; but it did get me thinking.</p> <p>What we also discovered in the course of the same investigation was the great number of other academic libraries to which I was allowed admission, on the strength of my status as a staff member at LSE. We decided to test this out with a small 'mystery shopper' exercise. Having retrieved a copy of the access rules for South Bank University Library (with, listed somewhere on page 2, the clause allowing LSE staff members reciprocal access) I duly set off on the 171 bus, armed with the plastic card that identified me as such (with the usual un-fetching photo and the magnetic strip that magically opened the turnstile at the LSE Library when I came into the office every morning). There were two serious flaws in this plan. The first was due to the fact that single-sided photocopying was clearly the norm at South Bank, and the otherwise very polite security officer at the Perry Library was only in possession of page 1 of their admissions rules, and so he couldn't see a reason to let me in. I would like to believe that the second flaw was a result of my personal fame in the library world; but it was really because quite a lot of librarians tend to circulate around jobs in London universities, and a former LSE Library colleague was currently managing the counters there, recognised me and told the officer to let me in. The project team decided that I would need some serious disguises before being allowed out to do any more mystery shopping!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paschoud" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article john paschoud british library cardiff university jisc kings college london london school of economics school of oriental and african studies sconul south bank university ucisa university college london university of bristol es-loa identity management toolkit identity project access control archives cataloguing data data management foi graphics higher education infrastructure passwords research rfid search technology shibboleth wiki Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1542 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Usability Inspection of Digital Libraries http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paterson-low <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/paterson-low#author1">Lorraine Paterson</a> and <a href="/issue63/paterson-low#author2">Boon Low</a> highlight findings from the usability inspection report conducted for the UX2.0 research project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paterson-low" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article boon low lorraine paterson american library association british library iso jisc national e-science centre oreilly university of edinburgh aquabrowser europeana jisc information environment ux2.0 worldcat accessibility ajax cataloguing digital library e-science facebook framework ict interoperability personalisation research resource discovery search technology social networks software standardisation standards tag cloud twitter usability web 2.0 Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1543 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Volcanic Eruptions Fail to Thwart Digital Preservation - the Planets Way http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author1">Matthew Barr</a>, <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author2">Amir Bernstein</a>, <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author3">Clive Billenness</a> and <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author4">Manfred Thaller</a> report on the final Planets training event Digital Preservation - The Planets Way held in Rome over 19 - 21 April 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div align="center"> <p style="text-align: left;">In far more dramatic circumstances than expected, the Planets Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] held its 3-day training event<em> Digital Preservation – The Planets Way</em> in Rome over 19 - 21 April 2010. This article reports its proceedings.</p> </div><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report amir bernstein clive billenness manfred thaller matthew barr austrian national library british library national library of the netherlands oais open planets foundation opf swiss federal archives university of cologne university of glasgow archives bibliographic data browser cataloguing cloud computing data database digital preservation digital repositories digitisation file format framework graphics identifier interoperability java metadata national library operating system preservation repositories research software usb visualisation web browser web services xml youtube zip Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1549 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk RDA: Resource Description and Access http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/rda-briefing-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/rda-briefing-rpt#author1">Wendy Taylor</a> and <a href="/issue63/rda-briefing-rpt#author2">Helen Williams</a> report on CILIP's Executive Briefings on RDA : Resource Description and Access held at CILIP on 23 March 2010 and repeated at the Bloomsbury Hotel on 30 March 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/rda-briefing-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report helen williams wendy taylor american library association british library british museum cilip ifla library association library of congress liverpool john moores university london school of economics rnib ukoln university college london aacr2 authority data bibliographic control bibliographic data cataloguing data digital media dublin core frad frbr information retrieval library management systems marc marc21 national library onix research resource description and access schema search technology standards video webinar Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1552 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="headlines"></a></p> <h3 id="Engagement_Impact_Value_Workshop">Engagement, Impact, Value Workshop</h3> <p>University of Manchester<br />Monday 24 May 2010<br /><a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/engagement-impact-value-201005/">http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/engagement-impact-value-201005/</a></p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 news and events richard waller austrian national library bnf british library cilip cni datacite ibm jisc library of congress loughborough university microsoft mimas oclc surffoundation tilburg university ukoln university of exeter university of illinois university of manchester university of sheffield europeana iwmw lis research coalition worldcat archives cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set database digital library digital preservation dissemination doi dublin core ebook ejournal further education higher education ipad itunes knowledge management linked data metadata mobile national library portal preservation privacy repositories research resource description and access search technology semantic web software standardisation twitter usability visualisation web 2.0 web development web services Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1553 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk