Overview of content related to 'bibliographic data' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/1175/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Developing Adaptable, Efficient Mobile Library Services: Librarians as Enablers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/caperon <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue73/caperon#author1">Lizzie Caperon</a> describes how library resources can be targeted towards effective mobile services as mobile devices become increasingly prevalent in Higher Education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Mobile devices such as smartphones, iPads and tablet computers are rapidly proliferating in society and changing the way information is organised, received and disseminated. Consequently the library world must adopt mobile services which maximise and adapt to these significant technological changes. What do library users want from mobile services? How can libraries adopt new, innovative mobile initiatives?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/caperon" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue73 feature article lizzie caperon british library google ieee information today jisc microsoft national university of ireland university of birmingham university of leeds university of manchester university of sheffield university of warwick android archives augmented reality bibliographic data cataloguing data database doi e-learning ebook framework geospatial data higher education instant messaging ipad lbs mobile mobile learning mobile phone modelling operating system podcast portal qr code research responsive design search technology smartphone social software tablet computer twitter usability video web 2.0 webinar wireless wordpress Thu, 17 Jul 2014 16:33:54 +0000 lisrw 2532 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hita-Hita: Open Access and Institutional Repositories in Japan Ten Years On http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author1">Ikuko Tsuchide</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author2">Yui Nishizono</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author3">Masako Suzuki</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author4">Shigeki Sugita</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author5">Kazuo Yamamoto</a> and <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author6">Hideki Uchijima</a> introduce a number of ideas and projects that have enhanced the progress of the Open Access movement and institutional repositories in Japan over the last ten years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In Japan, Chiba University established the country's first institutional repository, CURATOR [<a href="#1">1</a>] in 2003. Since then, over the last 10 years or so, more than 300 universities and research institutions have set up repositories and the number of full-text items on repositories has exceeded one million [<a href="#2">2</a>]. All the contents are available on Japanese Institutional Repositories Online (JAIRO) [<a href="#3">3</a>] operated by the National Institute of Informatics (NII) [<a href="#4">4</a>] in Japan.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article hideki uchijima ikuko tsuchide kazuo yamamoto masako suzuki shigeki sugita yui nishizono asahikawa medical university cranfield university digital repository federation hokkaido university kagoshima university national institute of informatics osaka university otaru university of commerce sherpa sherpa-leap university of tokyo university of tsukuba repositories support project romeo rsp wikipedia archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data database digitisation dissemination facebook higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata open access repositories research search technology standardisation twitter Wed, 10 Jul 2013 17:03:28 +0000 lisrw 2480 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Performance-based Funding Model: Creating New Research Databases in Sweden and Norway http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eriksson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eriksson#author1">Leif Eriksson</a> describes how the introduction of Performance-based Research Funding Systems (PRFS) has created new forms of research databases in Sweden and Norway.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The introduction of Performance-based Research Funding Systems (PRFS) models has helped to set the focus on scientific publishing since this is one of the major indicators for measuring research output. As a secondary result, it has also forced the countries that have introduced a model that is not solely based on citations to create a new form of research database; the national portal for scientific literature.</p> <p>Even in countries that have not adapted a PRFS model, these forms of portals are common. In Sweden, the national database has been the result of local universities’ and Higher Education institutions’ efforts towards a mutual search interface to the different local repositories that have emerged.&nbsp; The repositories are sometimes created to support a local funding model, but the most common reason is simply to disseminate scientific publishing.</p> <p>The contribution of publications that cannot be found in the international citation indexes are substantial even for peer-reviewed publications especially for literature in the Humanities and the Social Sciences but also in Natural Sciences by adding a lot of conference papers that would otherwise not be recognised.&nbsp; This can be seen as a side-effect of the discussions on the introduction of PRFS models. Even if not all publications meet the criteria to be recognised as scientific, a significant number of them are still added to the base of publications that can be analysed from a PRFS perspective.</p> <p>The incentive to disseminate search results is the other driving force for the national catalogues and, in this case, the portals are playing an important role since many of the publications mainly written in domestic languages are otherwise seldom visible to other researchers and the public.</p> <h2 id="Background">Background</h2> <p>The change in the Higher Education landscape has been significant over the last decades. One of the major changes has been the introduction of performance-based research funding systems (PRFS) starting with the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) in the United Kingdom in 1986 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>The incentive offered by a PRFS model is that it overturns the allocation of funding often based on historical grounds which are no longer valid. It can also be considered as a part of an orientation towards more effective management of the public sector, based on principles derived from the private sector. The central idea in this transformation is the drive to increase productivity without adding resources to the system, while replacing traditional command-and-control systems with market-style incentives [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p>Publications are playing a more and more important role in the process of evaluating research and also as an indicator in the performance-based research funding systems (PRFS). Of 14 countries which were identified as having PRFSs, at least 10 have publication output as an indicator of research quality [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p>The reason why publications are used as a PRFS indicator is that the latter measures the output of research both quantitatively and qualitatively. Moreover, those publication data are easily found in bibliographic databases.&nbsp; However, the introduction of an indicator for publications has not been without controversy in the countries that have adopted PRFS. The resulting discussions have generally focused on two main issues:</p> <ol> <li>Should publications be used as a first-order or a second-order indicator?</li> <li>Which data source would best reflect the research output in a particular country?</li> </ol> <p>OECD launched a report on various PRFS models in 2010 including a systematic exposition of the different indicators being used [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Publications are often found among the first-order indicators which are aimed directly at measuring research performance. This can be done by simply counting publications in relation to the number of research staff of a certain institution but the common practice is to add a qualitative element, either by ranking of publication channels as occurs in Denmark and Norway, or by citation analysis as operates in Belgium, that is, in the Flemish community, and Sweden.</p> <p>Second-order indicators are based on indexes instead of direct measurements. These indexes are often created as a reaction to the methodological difficulties when dealing with citation analysis. The best known indexes are Journal Impact Factor (JIF) which measures a journal’s impact through the number of citations its articles receive, and H-index which is often used on an individual level when comparing the citation history of different authors. However, both indicators are simplifications of more complex structures and have been criticised when being used for research assessment purposes [<a href="#4">4</a>].</p> <p>The second question has created even more controversy in those countries which have adopted a PRFS model. When deciding on which database would best support the publication indicator, the issue as to which type of publications should be counted immediately comes to the fore.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eriksson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article leif eriksson oracle uppsala university worldcat aggregation bibliographic data bibliographic database cataloguing data database dissemination doi higher education national library open access portal rae repositories research search technology ssh visualisation Wed, 03 Jul 2013 17:38:13 +0000 lisrw 2465 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Wellcome Library, Digital http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author1">Christy Henshaw</a> and <a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author2">Robert Kiley</a> describe how the Wellcome Library has transformed its information systems to support mass digitisation of historic collections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online access is now the norm for many spheres of discovery and learning. What benefits bricks-and-mortar libraries have to offer in this digital age is a subject of much debate and concern, and will continue to be so as learning resources and environments shift ever more from the physical to the virtual. In order to maintain a place in this dual environment, most research libraries strive to replicate their traditional offerings in the digital world.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article christy henshaw robert kiley jisc wellcome library wellcome trust algorithm api archives authentication bibliographic data blog born digital cache cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data database digital archive digital asset management digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation facebook flash framework html html5 information architecture infrastructure javascript jpeg jpeg 2000 json library management systems licence metadata mets mobile passwords portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology standards twitter url usability video web browser xml schema Tue, 18 Jun 2013 14:52:03 +0000 lisrw 2449 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ECLAP 2013: Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eclap-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the second international conference held by ECLAP, the e-library for performing arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The beautiful city of Porto was the host location for ECLAP 2013 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the 2nd International Conference on Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment. &nbsp;Porto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon and home of the Instituto Politécnico do Porto (IPP), the largest polytechnic in the country, with over 18,500 students.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report marieke guy bbc coventry university dcc microsoft oais ukoln university of leeds university of lisbon w3c europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data blog copyright creative commons data data management digital archive digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dublin core dvd ebook epub foaf framework geospatial data haptics higher education ict internet explorer interoperability knowledge base lod metadata multimedia ontologies open data owl preservation rdf remote working repositories research schema social networks software standards streaming usability video vocabularies Thu, 04 Jul 2013 20:46:57 +0000 lisrw 2471 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk JABES 2013 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jabes-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/jabes-rpt#author1">Marlène Delhaye</a> reports on the two-day annual conference organised by the French Agence Bibliographique de l’Enseignement Supérieur (ABES) held in Montpellier, France over 14-15 May 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In what has now become something of a tradition, the ‘Corum’ Congress Centre in Montpellier, France, hosted the twelfth in the series of the Journées de l’Agence Bibliographique de l’Enseignement Supérieur (ABES - Higher Education Bibliographic Agency) [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jabes-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report marlene delhaye bnf editeur google jisc jisc collections national library of australia oclc orcid universite d’aix-marseille open library worldcat api archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing collection development controlled vocabularies data digital object identifier digitisation dissemination doi ebook epub freemium hashtag higher education html identifier infrastructure internet explorer interoperability knowledge base library management systems licence metadata mooc national library open access open data portal privacy repositories research resource description and access standards sushi tagging text mining twitter video web app Mon, 01 Jul 2013 12:11:53 +0000 lisrw 2459 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information Consulting - Guide to good practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/white-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/white-rvw#author1">Martin White</a> reviews a book written by three experienced consultants that seeks to support information professionals in setting themselves up as consultants.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve been working in information consultancy for over 35 years and not regretted for a moment my choice of career. It’s taken me to over 30 countries and the opportunity to work with an amazing array of organisations in temperatures ranging from 47C to minus 25C. I’ve had project meetings on the top floor of the United Nations building, on a boat anchored in the harbour at Cannes, a luxury hotel in Oman and in a London convent. I’ve flown on HP’s corporate jet, had lunch with Henry Kissinger and was inside the IMF in Washington on 9/11.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/white-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review martin white british library intranet focus ltd university of sheffield bibliographic data data e-science file sharing framework information retrieval intranet research search technology Wed, 26 Jun 2013 19:57:38 +0000 lisrw 2453 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Upskilling Liaison Librarians for Research Data Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/cox-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author1">Andrew Cox</a>, <a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author2">Eddy Verbaan</a> and <a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author3">Barbara Sen</a> explore the design of a curriculum to train academic librarians in the competencies to support Research Data Management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For many UK HEIs, especially research-intensive institutions, Research Data Management (RDM) is rising rapidly up the agenda. Working closely with other professional services, and with researchers themselves, libraries will probably have a key role to play in supporting RDM. This role might include signposting institutional expertise in RDM; inclusion of the topic in information literacy sessions for PhD students and other researchers; advocacy for open data sharing; or contributing to the management of an institutional data repository.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/cox-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article andrew cox barbara sen eddy verbaan dcc jisc northumbria university sconul uk data archive university of essex university of sheffield datum for health rdmrose archives bibliographic data bibliometrics cataloguing collection development copyright curation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital library e-research e-science framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository knowledge base knowledge management licence metadata open access open data open education preservation repositories research software web portal Thu, 06 Dec 2012 19:27:43 +0000 lisrw 2402 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23rd International CODATA Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk EMTACL12 (Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author1">Sarah Rayner</a> and <a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author2">Olivia Walsby</a> report on a three-day conference on Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries, hosted by NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) in Trondheim, Norway over 1 - 3 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Think_Different">Think Different</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>The three-day conference consisted of eight keynote presentations by invited speakers and a number of parallel sessions. The main themes set out for this year’s conference were supporting research, organisational change within the library, linked open data and other semantic web applications in the library, new literacies, and new services/old services in new clothes, along with other relevant perspectives on emerging technologies.</p> <p>We attended the conference to gain an overview of organisational changes happening across the sector in relation to technological developments and to gather opinion on the relevance of the academic library within a digital society. We also wanted to explore how the future exploitation of new technologies within libraries might have a positive impact on the quality of teaching and learning together with the student experience.</p> <p>This article will summarise a selection of keynote and parallel sessions from across the three days that addressed these issues.</p> <h3 id="October_2012:_Keynotes">1 October 2012: Keynotes</h3> <h2 id="Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</h2> <h3 id="Herbert_Van_de_Sompel_Los_Alamos_National_Laboratory_USA">Herbert Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA</h3> <p>The opening keynote presented by Herbert Van de Sompel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA raised the issues brought about by changes to scholarly communication. Herbert spoke about an increase in dynamic scholarly records that are continually in flux, interdependent, and Web-based, and with which our current infrastructures are unable to cope. With the publication of interdependent and executable papers, research is now a native Web activity; supporting the re-execution of algorithms and the ability to add data at any time (i.e. <a href="http://topicpages.ploscompbiol.org/wiki/Topic_Pages">PLoS Topic Pages</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] <a href="https://peerj.com/">PeerJ</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>]). Herbert pointed out that, as a consequence, we now need to be able to view the state of a scholarly record at certain moments in time; to track back in time to see where findings have come from, and to trace the workflow, and therein lies a challenge for academic libraries.</p> <p>Herbert explained that at present the archive infrastructure is only able to deal with static, non-fluxing research output, that, when using URIs, you will always come to the current version, not prior versions, and that Web archives are not integrated into the Web. As Herbert went on to point out, the key problem is that the Web was created without motion of time; existing in the ‘perpetual now’.</p> <p>Herbert believes that the challenges we face in this new environment are two-fold: archival approaches need to be changed to use a different infrastructure; and we need to reassess how we reference scholarly assets. We have CMS records, Web archives, and caches, but it would be better to trace the history or timeline of a URI. Therefore, Herbert offered some potential tools and solutions; <a href="http://mementoweb.org/">Memento</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>] (started in 2009) allows you to track back to a past version of an item in the Internet archive, bridging current URIs to old URIs from the Internet archive, using a time gate. <a href="http://mementoweb.github.com/SiteStory/" title="SiteStory">SiteStory</a> [<a href="#4">4</a>] is a tool which allows your Web server to take an active part in its own archiving; every request from a user is pushed back to an archive and stored. Therefore, every time material is accessed, it is archived, thereby providing a true history of an object in the archive.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure1-herbert-van-de-sempel-v3.jpg" style="width: 477px; height: 358px;" title="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Herbert Van de Sompel</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>In conclusion, Herbert suggested that archiving needs to be an ongoing activity, tracing every interaction, including archiving links at the time of publication to ensure that the context and history of an evolving piece of research will never be lost.</p> <h2 id="Think_Different">Think Different</h2> <h3 id="Karen_Coyle_Berkeley_CA_USA">Karen Coyle, Berkeley, CA, USA</h3> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure2-karen-coyle-v2.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" title="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Karen Coyle</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>Karen opened by raising a challenge to the way in which libraries are still holding on to outdated practices, such as the librarian’s obsession with alphabetical order, describing it as essentially only ‘an accident of language’ and questioning its continuing relevance given the now pervasive ability to cross-search. Karen continued on this theme citing bibliographic hierarchies such as Dewey as ‘knowledge prevention systems’ which only serve to lock our users into a set view of what's out there.</p> <p>Karen’s introduction led nicely on to the main themes of her presentation: the current role of the library, the need to move away from the view that getting the book into the user’s hand is the end game, and the need to change our attitudes to bibliographic control and linear order. In effect, ‘the library should no longer be about volume and ownership!’. Karen talked about how we should instead focus on <em>how</em> resources are used and what resources should be used <em>together,</em> to inform how we approach provision in the future. Karen believes that the library must become connected to information on the Web, providing more context for our users and thus allowing greater information discovery. Karen argued that the library’s role is no longer simply to gather items into an inventory but to seek to organise information that until now has been inconveniently packaged. She suggested that we need to change our view, to focus on the information and its context, <em>not</em> the objects or books themselves. Karen noted in particular that currently we present nothing within the context of time, reiterating the theme of time travel covered in Herbert’s presentation. So, how can we do this? Karen proposed that we should be able to interrogate catalogues to provide items with context. She gave examples such as <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/">WorldCat</a> [<a href="#5">5</a>], where you can view timelines on people, what they have published and what has been published about them, giving a relative image of their importance.<br /><br />Karen argued that although linked data could prove to be an answer, or could certainly help, we must nonetheless seek to find a range of solutions and technologies. She warned that the pitfall of having an answer is that it stops you asking questions! Karen talked about how libraries must now recognise that bibliographic data are available everywhere, and that what libraries have that is essential and unique are the details on holdings. She proposed that on searching the Web, part of the rich snippet should include information about what the library holds and whether it's available. The Web should be used to direct readers to their library holdings, as well as making use of data such as location information, already being sourced by search engines. Karen’s concluding remarks were that libraries need to look to this new approach (using tools such as <a href="http://Schema.org" target="_blank">Schema.org</a> [<a href="#6">6</a>]) or they will lose visitors, and that if we want to remain visible and relevant, we need to be where our users are - on the Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report olivia walsby sarah rayner jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas ukoln university of bath university of manchester internet archive memento scarlet schema.org worldcat algorithm api archives augmented reality bibliographic control bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing content management data dissemination e-learning ebook framework google docs google maps information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer ipad linked data lod mobile open access research search technology social networks software uri web 2.0 web app windows Thu, 13 Dec 2012 14:42:26 +0000 lisrw 2410 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Online Information 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/online-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the largest gathering of information professionals in Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online Information [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an interesting conference as it brings together information professionals from both the public and the private sector. The opportunity to share experiences from these differing perspectives doesn’t happen that often and brings real benefits, such as highly productive networking. This year’s Online Information, held between 20 - 21 &nbsp;November, felt like a slightly different event to previous years.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy amazon dcc google jisc microsoft mimas oclc ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of sussex datashare dmponline rdmrose scarlet schema.org wikipedia worldcat algorithm augmented reality bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories facebook flickr framework higher education identifier interoperability junaio library data licence linked data marc metadata mobile oer open data open source operating system privacy qr code rdfa remote working repositories research search technology software streaming twitter uri video vocabularies youtube Sun, 16 Dec 2012 17:10:56 +0000 lisrw 2437 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: User Studies for Digital Library Development http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/aytac-rvw#author1">Selenay Aytac</a> reviews a collection of essays on user studies and digital library development that provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>User Studies for Digital Library Development</em> provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries. While there are many books on user studies and digital library development, this work operates at the junction of these two domains and stands out for its insights, balance, and quality of its case-based investigations. The book brings together points of view from different professional communities, including practitioners as well as researchers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review selenay aytac bbc glasgow caledonian university library of congress long island university manchester metropolitan university national library of australia university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of malta university of oxford university of sheffield university of strathclyde europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data course design creative commons data digital library digital preservation e-learning framework information society metadata mobile multimedia national library open access research resource discovery usability web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:10:17 +0000 lisrw 2412 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Using Mobile Technology to Deliver Library Services http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/maclellan-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/maclellan-rvw#author1">Fiona MacLellan</a> reviews a practical guide to mobile technology and its use in delivering library services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>My initial thought upon seeing <em>Using Mobile Technology to Deliver Library Services</em> was available for review was that it was a topic of which I have limited knowledge – but part of its appeal was that I could learn about a new subject.&nbsp; After I registered to review the book I then had second thoughts. I began to worry that the book would be too advanced for me.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/maclellan-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review fiona maclellan university of northampton augmented reality bibliographic data ebook licence mobile mobile phone qr code research rfid sms Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:05:05 +0000 lisrw 2429 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The E-copyright Handbook http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/oppenheim-rvw#author1">Charles Oppenheim</a> takes a look at the latest of Paul Pedley’s copyright guidance books, and, in some respects, finds it wanting.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Paul Pedley is a name that needs no introduction to <em>aficionados</em> of copyright textbooks, being the author of several such books published by Facet Publishing in the past (and reviewed by <em>Ariadne </em>[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>][<a href="#3">3</a>][<a href="#4">4</a>][<a href="#5">5</a>]).&nbsp; His latest effort, <em>The E-copyright Handbook</em>, attempts to cover the fast-moving and complex world of electronic copyright, using an interesting approach.&nbsp; Rather than the traditional way of such books, describing the media and describing the rights granted to copyright owners, the way the law applies to each media type, exceptions to copyright and so on, his approach is a mixture but with some emphasis on activities, as a glance at the chapter titles shows: Introduction, Content Types, Activities, Copyright Exceptions, Licences, the Digital Economy Act, Enforcement and The Hargreaves Review.&nbsp;</p> <p>It is a complex approach, which requires careful cross-referencing and also checking that material is neither duplicated, nor that is anything is overlooked.&nbsp; It is not clear to me whether the book is meant for reading through, or whether it should be just dipped into when a particular issue causes someone to check the law; but I found the approach confusing.&nbsp;</p> <p>The book also suffers from being in a fast-moving area, where the law, and technology, change fast and although it is clear that Facet got the book published in record time, as there are numerous references to 2012 developments in the text, the work is already out of date in several places, and will no doubt get more out of date as the months go on.&nbsp; Another problem is that the book cannot make up its mind whether it is written for UK readers, or readers in the EU, or in the USA.&nbsp; All too often, different countries’ court cases are mentioned together; one is (say) a UK case and another is a US case.&nbsp; Without the understanding that US law and UK law in this field are very different, people will come to incorrect conclusions about the significance of the cases to them in their day to day work. Moreover, all too often the cases are described without any court decisions relating to them being provided; so one is left with the worry ‘why did the author mention this case at all?’</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review charles oppenheim bbc de montfort university google jisc loughborough university university of strathclyde bibliographic data bibliometrics cloud computing copyright data database dissemination google books open access research standards streaming url web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:30:54 +0000 lisrw 2415 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Understanding Information and Computation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/white-rvw#author1">Martin White</a> reviews a very individual perspective on the extent to which the growth and structure of the World Wide Web is governed by the fundamental laws of physics and mathematics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I have been a member of the information profession for almost 60 years, but then I started at a very young age.&nbsp;&nbsp; Indeed I was a library assistant at the age of four.&nbsp; My grandfather was the volunteer librarian for the small library in Clanfield, Hampshire, which opened up for a couple of afternoons each week.&nbsp; My job was to stack the books up, and help him put them back on the shelves.&nbsp; I felt very important.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review martin white ibm intranet focus ltd oxford university press university of oxford university of sheffield bibliographic data content management data information retrieval intranet research search technology Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:51:07 +0000 lisrw 2416 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Collaboration and Interaction in a Post-graduate Research Programme http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for post-graduate students where RefShare is deployed for digital storage and retrieval, alongside Blackboard for the purposes of communication. She also describes the role of the information specialist in the programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p align="left">The Phytomedicine Programme is a multidisciplinary and collaborative research programme investigating therapeutically useful compounds present in plants growing in South Africa. &nbsp;The programme was started in 1995 and was transferred to the Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria in 2002. In 2007 it was designated as a National Research Foundation Developed Research Niche Area [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article tertia coetsee blackboard elsevier google harvard university ibm ifla university of cambridge university of melbourne university of pretoria archives authentication bibliographic data blackboard learning system blog collection development copyright data data mining database digital preservation dissemination electronic theses facebook ict information society knowledge management mobile learning open access passwords podcast privacy refworks research search technology software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 08:39:58 +0000 lisrw 2350 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Ariadne: Migrating and Enriching Content with Drupal http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/bunting <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/bunting#author1">Thom Bunting</a> explains some of the technology behind the migration of <em>Ariadne</em> (including more than 1600 articles from its back issues archive) onto a Drupal content management platform.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Tools and strategies for content management are a perennial topic in <em>Ariadne. </em> With&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/content-management?article-type=&amp;term=&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=" title="Link to overview of articles including references to 'content management'">more than one hundred articles</a>&nbsp;touching on content management system (CMS) technologies or techniques since this online magazine commenced publication in 1996,&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;attests to continuing interest in this topic. Authors have discussed this topic within various contexts, from&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/content-management?article-type=&amp;term=intranet&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=&amp;issue=#content-overview" title="Link to articles discussing 'content management', within 'intranet' context">intranets</a> to&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/repositories?article-type=&amp;term=content+management&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=&amp;issue=#content-overview" title="Link to overview of articles referring to 'content management', within 'repositories' context">repositories</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/content-management?article-type=&amp;term=web+2.0&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=&amp;issue=#content-overview" title="Link to overview of articles discussing 'content management', within context of Web 2.0">Web 2.0</a>, &nbsp;with some notable&nbsp;<a href="/sites/all/datacharts/hc/72-chart-wp.html#timeline" title="Link to timeline: articles referring to 'content management'">surges in references to 'content management' between 2000 and 2005</a>&nbsp;(see Figure 1 below). &nbsp;Although levels of discussion are by no means trending, over recent years it is clear that&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em> authors have taken note of and written about content management tools and techniques on a regular basis.&nbsp;</p> <p>In the light of this long-established interest, it is noteworthy that&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em> itself migrated into a content management system only recently. Although the formatting of its articles did change a few times since 1996, <em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;remained 'hand-coded' for more than fifteen years. &nbsp;None of its articles had been migrated into a database-driven content management system until March 2012, when&nbsp;<a href="/issue68" title="Link to table of contents for Ariadne issue 68">issue 68</a>&nbsp;was published.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As mentioned in the&nbsp;<a href="/issue68/editorial1" title="Editorial introduction: Welcome to New Ariadne">editorial introduction</a>&nbsp;to that first issue, launching the new content management arrangements, and as discussed in some more detail below (see 'Technical challenges in content migration'), the considerable size of&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em>'s archive of back issues was daunting. &nbsp;With <a href="/articles" title="Overview of more than 1600 articles in Ariadne">more than 1600 articles</a>&nbsp;in hand-coded 'flat'-html formats,&nbsp;the process of migration itself required careful planning to result in a seamless, graceful transition into an entirely new content management arrangement. &nbsp;Over time, the sheer size of the <em>Ariadne</em> corpus had made it both increasingly rich in content and increasingly more challenging to convert retrospectively into a database-driven CMS as the total number of articles published within this online magazine steadily expanded.&nbsp;</p> <p>In looking back over the recent process of migrating <em>Ariadne</em> onto a CMS platform, this article discusses some tools and techniques used to prepare content for transfer, testing, and then re-launch. &nbsp;After explaining some of the background to and objectives of this work, this article focuses on key features of content management supported by Drupal.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: Timeline of references in Ariadne to content management" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue69-bunting/content%20management-timeline.png" style="height: 453px; width: 500px; " title="Figure 1: Timeline of references in Ariadne to content management" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: Ariadne timeline of references to content management</strong></p> <h2 id="Requirements_Analysis:_Planning_the_Way_Forward">Requirements Analysis: Planning the Way Forward</h2> <p>Based on surveys of readers and authors conducted in late 2010, the <em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;management team analysed the range of feedback, drew up sets of re-development requirements, and then considered the options available.</p> <p>The following table provides an overview of key findings regarding the range of enhanced functionality and features considered:</p> <table align="center" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" id="500wtable" style="width: 500px; "> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center; "><strong>Overview of findings derived from survey responses</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center; "><em>enhanced functionality or feature</em></td> <td style="text-align: center; "><em>interest recorded in surveys</em></td> </tr> <tr> <td>browsing by keywords</td> <td>73.4% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>updated look and feel</td> <td>62.3% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>browsing by title</td> <td>50.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>enhanced use of search engine</td> <td>48.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved display for portable devices</td> <td>34.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>more summative information on articles</td> <td>32.1% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved navigability from article level</td> <td>32.1% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved social media options</td> <td>29.5% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>browsing by author</td> <td>28.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved RSS feeds</td> <td>27.0% of respondents</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>In addition to these findings derived from surveys, the management team also recognised the need for some other functionalities to support monitoring of <em>Ariadne</em>'s on-going engagement with various domains and institutions across the UK and beyond.</p> <table align="center" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" id="500wtable" style="width: 500px; "> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center; "><strong>Additional features to support monitoring of engagement</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: left; ">identification of author domains (higher education, further education, research, commercial, etc)</td> <td style="text-align: left; ">to support analysis of <em>Ariadne</em> connections and reach across various sectors</td> </tr> <tr> <td>identification of authors by organisation</td> <td>to support analysis of <em>Ariadne</em> connections and reach in UK and worldwide</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Taking into account the key findings derived from survey questions as well as the additional functionality identified as useful in monitoring UK and worldwide engagement, the <em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;management team drew up sets of re-development requirements and considered how to proceed.&nbsp;Migration into a content management system represented the obvious way forward, as it became clear that <em>Ariadne</em>'s&nbsp;previous tradition of 'hand-coded' production (dating from the early days of the Web) had little chance of coping gracefully with the new sets of requirements.</p> <p>In a review of CMS options available, it also became clear that&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drupal" title="Wikipedia article: Drupal">Drupal</a>&nbsp;[<a href="#1">1</a>] was well positioned as a content management system (or, emphasising its highly modular and extensible design, <em>content management framework </em>&nbsp;[<a href="#2">2</a>] ) to supply required functionality and features.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/bunting" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up thom bunting ibm microsoft ukoln university of bath datagovuk gnu wikipedia apache api archives bibliographic data content licence content management css data data set database drupal framework further education graphics higher education html identifier jquery json licence linux metadata mysql open source perl php preservation python rdf repositories research rss search technology software sql server sqlite standards taxonomy usability video visualisation web 2.0 xml Fri, 27 Jul 2012 16:47:36 +0000 lisrw 2348 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Redeveloping the Loughborough Online Reading List System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author1">Jon Knight</a>, <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author2">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author3">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the redevelopment of Loughborough University’s open source reading list system.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Loughborough Online Reading Lists System (LORLS) [<a href="#1">1</a>] has been developed at Loughborough University since the late 1990s.&nbsp; LORLS was originally implemented at the request of the University’s Learning and Teaching Committee simply to make reading lists available online to students.&nbsp; The Library staff immediately saw the benefit of such a system in not only allowing students ready access to academics’ reading lists but also in having such access themselves. This was because a significant number of academics were bypassing the library when generating and distributing lists to their students who were then in turn surprised when the library did not have the recommended books either in stock or in sufficient numbers to meet demand.</p> <p>The first version of the system produced by the Library Systems Team was part of a project that also had a ‘reading lists amnesty’ in which academics were encouraged to provide their reading lists to the library which then employed some temporary staff over the summer to enter them into the new system.&nbsp; This meant that the first version of LORLS went live in July 2000 with a reasonable percentage of lists already in place.&nbsp; Subsequently the creation and editing of reading lists was made the responsibility of the academics or departmental admin staff, with some assistance from library staff.</p> <p>LORLS was written in Perl, with a MySQL database back-end.&nbsp; Most user interfaces were delivered via the web, with a limited number of back-end scripts that helped the systems staff maintain the system and alert library staff to changes that had been made to reading lists.</p> <p>Soon after the first version of LORLS went live at Loughborough, a number of other universities expressed an interest in using or modifying the system. Permission was granted by the University to release it as open source under the General Public Licence (GPL)[<a href="#2">2</a>].&nbsp; New versions were released as the system was developed and bugs were fixed. The last version of the original LORLS code base/data design was version 5, which was downloaded by sites worldwide.</p> <h2 id="Redesign">Redesign</h2> <p>By early 2007 it was decided to take a step back and see if there were things that could be done better in LORLS.&nbsp; Some design decisions made in 1999 no longer made sense eight years later.&nbsp; Indeed some of the database design was predicated on how teaching modules were supposed to work at Loughborough and it had already become clear that the reality of how they were deployed was often quite different.&nbsp; For example, during the original design, the principle was that each module would have a single reading list associated with it.&nbsp; Within a few years several modules had been found that were being taught by two (or more!) academics, all wanting their own independent reading list.</p> <p>Some of the structuring of the data in the MySQL database began to limit how the system could be developed.&nbsp; The University began to plan an organisational restructuring shortly after the redesign of LORLS was commenced, and it was clear that the simple departmental structure was likely to be replaced by a more fluid school and department mix.</p> <p>Library staff were also beginning to request new features that were thus increasingly awkward to implement.&nbsp; Rather than leap through hoops to satisfy them within the framework of the existing system, it made sense to add them into the design process for a full redesign.</p> <p>It was also felt that the pure CGI-driven user interface could do with a revamp.&nbsp; The earlier LORLS user interfaces used only basic HTML forms, with little in the way of client-side scripting.&nbsp; Whilst that meant that they tended to work on any web browser and were pretty accessible, they were also a bit clunky compared to some of the newer dynamic web sites.</p> <p>A distinct separation of the user interface from the back-end database was decided upon to improve localization and portability of the system as earlier versions of LORLS had already shown that many sites took the base code and then customised the user interface parts of the CGI scripts to their own look and feel.&nbsp; The older CGI scripts were a mix of user interaction elements and database access and processing, which made this task a bit more difficult than it really needed to be.</p> <p>Separating the database code from the user interface code would let people easily tinker with one without unduly affecting the other.&nbsp; It would also allow local experimentation with multiple user-interface designs for different user communities or devices.</p> <p>This implied that a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) would need to be defined. As asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX)[<a href="#3">3</a>] interactions had been successful applied in a number of recent projects the team had worked on, XML was chosen as the format to be used.&nbsp; At first simple object access protocol (SOAP) style XML requests was experimented with, as well as XML responses, but it was soon realised that SOAP was far too heavy-weight for most of the API calls, so a lighter ‘RESTful’ API was selected.&nbsp; The API was formed of CGI scripts that took normal parameters as input and returned XML documents for the client to parse and display.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper jon knight google harvard university loughborough university microsoft gnu access control ajax api archives authentication bibliographic data blog cache chrome cookie data database digital library e-learning framework google books gpl html javascript jquery json library management systems licence metadata moodle mysql open source perl refworks restful schema shibboleth soap software sql standards web browser xml z39.50 zip Sat, 28 Jul 2012 14:32:55 +0000 lisrw 2354 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: I, Digital – A History Devoid of the Personal? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rusbridge-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/rusbridge-rvw#author1">Chris Rusbridge</a> reviews an edited volume that aims to fill a gap in ‘literature designed specifically to guide archivists’ thinking about personal digital materials’.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We are all too familiar with the dire predictions of coming Digital Dark Ages, when All Shall be Lost because of the fragility of our digital files and the transience of the formats. We forget, of course, that loss was always the norm. The wonderful documents in papyrus, parchment and paper that we so admire and wonder at, are the few lucky survivors of their times. Sometimes they have been carefully nurtured, sometimes they have been accidentally preserved. But almost all were lost!</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rusbridge-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review chris rusbridge british library dcc jisc national library of australia university of glasgow university of oxford university of virginia elib wikipedia archives bibliographic data curation data digital library digital preservation digital repositories ebook facebook internet explorer mis preservation privacy repositories research social web twitter web services wordpress youtube Sun, 29 Jul 2012 18:17:27 +0000 lisrw 2365 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 67: Changes Afoot http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 67.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>For readers who might have been wondering, I shall resist Mark Twain's remark about reports of his demise being exaggerated, and reassure you that while <em>Ariadne</em> has been undergoing changes to the way in which it will be delivered to the Web, it has been business as usual in the matter of the content, as you will see from the paragraphs that follow. Issue 67, while currently not looking any different, is in the process of being migrated to a new platform developed to enhance functionality and give a more user-friendly look and feel to the publication.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 editorial richard waller becta jisc jisc techdis meta-net ukoln university of bath university of derby devcsi homer multitext mobile campus assistant mymobilebristol wikipedia accessibility archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing curation data digital library digitisation elluminate eprints framework geospatial data gis identifier infrastructure interoperability librarything metadata mobile natural language processing preservation programming language repositories research rss semantic web software standards tagging twitter uima ulcc urn usability web 2.0 web services webinar Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1618 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Connecting Researchers at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/cope-jones <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/cope-jones#author1">Jez Cope</a> and <a href="/issue67/cope-jones#author2">Geraldine Jones</a> describe a recent series of events introducing social media to research students at the University of Bath.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Connected Researcher initiative is a response to both local and sector-wide events. At the University of Bath groups of postgraduate research students from Chemistry and Social Sciences separately expressed an interest in finding out how to profile their own research and establish links with other researchers in their fields.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/cope-jones" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article geraldine jones jez cope google research information network university of bath university of derby citeulike wikipedia bibliographic data blog curation database digital media dissemination doi e-learning hashtag higher education ict identifier microblogging mobile preservation research rss search technology social software social web syndication twitter video virtual research environment web 2.0 web services wiki wordpress Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1621 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Retooling Special Collections Digitisation in the Age of Mass Scanning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rinaldo-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author1">Constance Rinaldo</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author2">Judith Warnement</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author3">Tom Baione</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author4">Martin R. Kalfatovic</a> and <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author5">Susan Fraser</a> describe results from a study to identify and develop a cost-effective and efficient large-scale digitisation workflow for special collections library materials.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) [<a href="#1">1</a>] is a consortium of 12 natural history and botanical libraries that co-operate to digitise and make accessible the legacy literature of biodiversity held in their collections and to make that literature available for open access and responsible use as a part of a global 'biodiversity commons.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] The participating libraries hold more than two million volumes of biodiversity literature collected over 200 years to support the work of scientists, researchers and students in their home insti</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rinaldo-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article constance rinaldo judith warnement martin r. kalfatovic susan fraser tom baione american museum of natural history california digital library harvard university ifla library of congress new york botanical garden oclc smithsonian institution university of cambridge university of oxford internet archive open library wikipedia archives bibliographic data cataloguing csv data database digital library digitisation dublin core framework infrastructure intellectual property librarything metadata opac open access repositories research tagging url video web services wiki z39.50 Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1624 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk From Link Rot to Web Sanctuary: Creating the Digital Educational Resource Archive (DERA) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/scaife <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/scaife#author1">Bernard M Scaife</a> describes how an innovative use of the EPrints repository software is helping to preserve official documents from the Web.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>When I started as Technical Services Librarian at the Institute of Education (IOE) in September 2009, one of the first tasks I was given was to do something about all the broken links in the catalogue. Link rot [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the bane of the Systems Librarian's life and I was well aware that you had to run fast to stand still.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/scaife" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article bernard m scaife bbc becta google jisc national library of australia oai the national archives uk data archive university of london university of southampton archives bibliographic data cataloguing collection development content management copyright creative commons data data mining digital preservation digitisation dspace eprints fedora commons higher education html identifier infrastructure interoperability lcsh library management systems licence metadata ms word multimedia national library oai-pmh open access preservation provenance repositories research schema search technology software thesaurus ulcc url xml Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1625 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk DataCite UK User Group Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on the 2nd UK User Group meeting for DataCite, held at the British Library in London, in April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="top" id="top"></a></p> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>DataCite [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an international not-for-profit organisation dedicated to making research data a normal, citable part of the scientific record. It is made up of a membership of 15 major libraries and data centres, which, along with four associate members, represent 11 different countries across four continents. The approach taken by DataCite currently centres on assigning Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to datasets; it is a member of the International DOI Foundation and one of a handful of DOI registration agencies.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report alex ball badc british library d-lib magazine datacite dcc google mimas orcid science and technology facilities council uk data archive ukoln university of bath university of birmingham university of leicester university of oxford erim fishnet sagecite accessibility api archives bibliographic data cataloguing curation data data set digital curation digital preservation doi framework guid higher education identifier metadata national library open data preservation repositories research schema usability web resources Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1627 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk UK Reading Experience Database http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt#author1">Bethan Ruddock</a> reports from the launch event for the UK Reading Experience Database, held at the Betty Boothroyd Library, the Open University, Milton Keynes, on 24 February 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><p>I was invited down to the Open University (OU) Betty Boothroyd Library in Milton Keynes for the launch of the UK Reading Experience Database (UK RED) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. I had been asked to attend to talk about the LOCAH Project and Linked Data, but I was also looking forward to learning about the RED Project.</p> <p>This was the first of two launch days, and was designed for librarians, archivists, and information managers. A second launch day for teachers in Higher Education was to be held in London the next day.</p> <h2 id="What_Is_UK_RED">What Is UK RED?</h2> <p>The tagline for UK RED is 'the experience of reading in Britain from 1450 to 1945', and the database brings together reading experiences, making them both searchable and browsable. What is a reading experience? It is evidence of anyone alive between the mid-15th and 20thcenturies having read and interacted with a book or other piece of writing, such as magazines, newspapers, letters - even playbills and advertisements. Ownership alone is not enough; there must be something to show that the person in question actually read the work or at least part of it.</p> <p>This information can be found in a number of places - a printed book review would be an obvious example. The RED team also find many entries in diaries. Such entries can range from simple lists of books that someone has read over the course of a year, to detailed descriptions of when and where they read a particular book, and how they felt about it. Often diary entries are not actually about the book; it is mentioned in passing and in the context of a number of other activities.</p> <p>While the owner's name on the flyleaf is not itself enough to justify a 'reading experience', annotations to the text are, as they show that the person has actually interacted with the text. Of course, you then have to consider whether the person whose name is on the flyleaf is the same as the person doing the annotating!</p> <p>RED is much more than a list of 'people who have read books'. The database aims to bring out as much information as possible about the reading experience. The interface to submit a new entry allows you to specify where the reading was taking place, all the way down to a particular room in a particular house. It also aims to identify if the reading was silent or aloud, alone or with other people; whether the book was owned by the reader, a library book, borrowed, or even stolen. All these data are then used to build up a rich database of information on who was reading what (and how!) in Britain.</p> <p>UK RED is not just concerned with reading experiences within Britain: team members also look at the reading experiences of citizens abroad. <strong>Edmund King</strong>, Research Associate, Reading Experience Database, OU, told us that, as a consequence, there are fascinating examples of what captured British soldiers were reading in prisoner-of-war (POW) camps as well as examples of what they were not allowed to read. Books in Welsh and Pakistani were banned, as well as atlases and anything about the Russian revolution. I do not know if there are corresponding records for what prisoners in UK POW camps were forbidden to read, but it would be very interesting to find out.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report bethan ruddock ahrc eduserv jisc mimas newcastle university open university talis ukoln university of manchester university of oxford archives hub dbpedia locah lucero wikipedia apache archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing copac copyright data data set database dissemination flickr higher education intellectual property linked data linux open source php provenance research software sparql sql twitter video Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1629 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Envisioning Future Academic Library Services http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews a timely collection of essays that highlights the values of institutional leadership and resourcefulness in academic librarianship's engagements with Web 2.0.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Since networked information technology has initiated a breathtaking transformation of knowledge practices, librarians have had a generous supply of thought leaders whose lifetime experience has permitted them to issue credible translations of the 'writing on the wall'. Recently, however, there seems to be many more analysts (and soothsayers) and much more anxious observation and published interpretation of such writing. And the message comes in a red ink, in bold, and with distinct portent, when not downright ominous.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review john azzolini british library clifford chance google university of melbourne yale university bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright curation data data management data set digital library digitisation disruptive innovation dissemination ebook framework higher education ict knowledge management mobile muves open access personalisation preservation research search technology second life web 2.0 Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1632 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Reading Van Gogh Online? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/boot <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/boot#author1">Peter Boot</a> shows how log analysis can be employed to assess a site's usability, usage, and users, using the Van Gogh letter edition as an example.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v5 author edits, revised images and new table 4 : 2011-02-21-17-21 REW --><!-- v5 author edits, revised images and new table 4 : 2011-02-21-17-21 REW --><p>Large amounts of money are spent building scholarly resources on the web. Unlike online retailers, large publishers and banks, scholarly institutions tend not to monitor very closely the way visitors use their web sites. In this article I would like to show that a look at the traces users leave behind in the Web servers' log files can teach us much about our sites' usability and about the way visitors use them.</p> <p>In 2009 the <a href="http://www.huygensinstituut.knaw.nl/">Huygens Institute</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>], together with the <a href="http://www.vangoghmuseum.nl/">Van Gogh Museum</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>], published a new edition of the letters of Vincent van Gogh. The complete edition was <a href="http://vangoghletters.org/vg/">published online</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>], and is accessible for free; there is also a six-volume book edition [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The online edition was reviewed in a number of publications [<a href="#5">5</a>][<a href="#6">6</a>][<a href="#7">7</a>]. I will use the server logs of the Van Gogh edition as an example of what we can learn about our visitors. I will focus not on the simple quantities, but try to assess the visitors' access patterns. When we created the edition, our assumption was that researchers would use the web site, while people who wanted to read the letters would favour the book. The desire to test that assumption was one of the reasons for embarking on this investigation.</p> <p>When users view, or read, editions online, busy traffic is going on between their browser (e.g. Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari), and the web server where the edition is located. Web servers keep logs of this traffic, and inspecting the logs gives us an opportunity to see how people are actually using the editions that we create. When people buy a book, this shows their intention to use it, in some sense. When people go to a web site, the server registers their visit, including, depending on the design of the site, every page they read and every search they do.</p> <p>Most of the work on log analysis in scholarly environments has been done in the context of libraries researching use of electronic journals [<a href="#8">8</a>]. The financial interest in accurate knowledge about usage patterns in that context is obviously important. The LAIRAH (Log Analysis of Digital Resources in the Arts and Humanities) study [<a href="#9">9</a>] used log analysis on portal sites in order to assess usage of digital resources in the arts and humanities. I believe the present article is the first reported study on actual usage data of a scholarly digital edition.</p> <p>First I will discuss why these log data deserve investigation. I then will show what the data that we collect looks like and discuss both their potential and their limitations. I will give a brief overview of the edition site, as the log data can only be understood in the context of the site's structure and navigational facilities. Then I'll show a number of the things that can be done on the basis of the log files.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/boot" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article peter boot google huygens institute for dutch history university college london archives bibliographic data blog browser cache data digital library firefox graphics internet explorer operating system portal research safari search technology usability visualisation windows Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1603 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk RefShare: A Community of Practice to Enhance Research Collaboration http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for postgraduate students in phytomedicine using RefShare, to enhance collaborative research.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article tertia coetsee ifla university of melbourne university of pretoria jisc information environment bibliographic data copyright data database digital preservation dissemination e-research electronic theses ict infrastructure open data preservation privacy refworks research search technology web 2.0 web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1605 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Characterising and Preserving Digital Repositories: File Format Profiles http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author1">Steve Hitchcock</a> and <a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author2">David Tarrant</a> show how file format profiles, the starting point for preservation plans and actions, can also be used to reveal the fingerprints of emerging types of institutional repositories.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article david tarrant steve hitchcock amazon google harvard university jisc microsoft mpeg the national archives university of illinois university of northampton university of southampton university of the arts london wellcome library jisc information environment keepit wikipedia accessibility adobe archives bibliographic data blog cloud computing css csv curation data data management database digital curation digital preservation digital repositories dissemination document format droid eprints file format flash flash video framework gif graphics html hypertext identifier institutional repository java jpeg latex linked data metadata mpeg-1 open access open source photoshop php plain text preservation quicktime repositories research schema semantic web software standards vector graphics video web 2.0 wiki windows windows media xml xml schema Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1608 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 10 Years of Zetoc http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/ronson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/ronson#author1">Jane Ronson</a> looks at how Zetoc has developed and what the future holds for the service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Now celebrating its 10th anniversary, Zetoc [<a href="#1">1</a>] provides quality-assured, comprehensive journal table of contents data for resource discovery that users can search and have delivered straight to their in-box or desktop. In a nutshell, Zetoc is all about convenience, current awareness and comprehensive coverage. In a recent survey, one academic commented: 'This is a "one-stop shop" for relevant literature'. What is Zetoc, what has it achieved and where is it going? In this article I will look at the history of the service and how it has developed over the past decade.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/ronson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article jane ronson british library google harvard university heriot-watt university hewlett-packard jisc loughborough university mimas national library of wales nhs sconul stanford university university of chester university of manchester university of surrey dner my references suncat tictocs zetoc aggregation authentication bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing copac data database further education google scholar higher education identifier national library open access openurl personalisation repositories research resource discovery rss search technology shibboleth soap software sru tag cloud z39.50 Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1610 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Introducing RDA http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/clifford-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/clifford-rvw#author1">Katrina Clifford</a> reviews a work covering the long-heralded change in the cataloguing rule set - RDA (Resource Description and Access).</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3: author final edits implemented 2011-02-22 REW --><!-- v3: author final edits implemented 2011-02-22 REW --><p>The world of information description and retrieval is one of constant change and RDA (Resource Description and Access) is often touted as being one of the most radical changes on the horizon. Early discussions were often couched very much in terms of the principles behind the move from AACR2 (Anglo American Cataloguing Rules) and the principles of a FRBR (Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records)-based system. We gradually move closer to the Library of Congress' decision on whether to adopt RDA or not, raising questions of what adoption will mean in terms not just of day-to-day cataloguing but the wider retrieval world. Therefore, it is not just cataloguers who may feel they need to gain an understanding of exactly what RDA is and what moving to it will involve. The title of Chris Oliver's book, <em>Introducing RDA: A Guide to the Basics</em>, will, as a result, catch the eye of people from many spheres of information work.</p> <h2 id="Content_of_the_Book">Content of the Book</h2> <p>Although this book is just over 100 pages long, I would say it is not necessary to start at the beginning and work your way through the book to get the most out of it. If you're looking for something that places RDA squarely within the historical context of information retrieval and the rationale behind its development then the first two chapters give a comprehensive overview in relatively few pages. Chapter 1, 'What is RDA?' introduces the idea of RDA being designed as a result of an increasingly varied range of resources in need of description, especially those that are digital in nature. Additionally there is the need to search multiple datasets at once, including those beyond libraries, in allied institutions such as museums and archives. Chapter 2, 'RDA and the international context', as implied by the title explores the relationship of RDA to international documentation standards such as ISBD (International Standard Bibliographic Description) and how it copes in terms of handling language issues of catalogue records. It is just a brief overview however, all the ideas are discussed in one or two paragraphs each. Together, these two initial chapters would easily fill in the background for an uninitiated professional, such as a library school student and indeed they show that RDA is built upon many of the key concepts touched upon in library school courses, such as Cutter's<em> Rules for a dictionary catalog</em>.</p> <p>Chapter 3 furthers this introduction by describing FRBR and FRAD (Functional Requirements for Authority Data) and how they relate to RDA. In all the more recent discussions surrounding practical aspects of the uptake of RDA, the theoretical principles underlying it are often forgotten and revisiting them can be an interesting exercise. After an overview of how FRBR and FRAD are constructed, it moves on to why they are important. One figure lays out a MARC record and labels the fields with the appropriate FRBR entities which is helpful in understanding them in context. The remainder of the chapter shows how the RDA terms have been incorporated into the layout of the sections of RDA and the wording of the rules themselves. The chapter shows why RDA is laid out in a very different way to AACR2, grouping rules by the attribute described rather than by item format. This chapter is perhaps the most difficult to work through, but I feel this is due to the nature of the content, rather than any failing on the part of the author.</p> <p>Chapter 4 is entitled 'Continuity with AACR2' and while this may indicate it will describe how catalogues may appear different, the start of the chapter focuses more on continuity in terms of governance and principles rather than on the nuts and bolts of the records themselves. It does move to describing how AACR2 has been reworked into RDA, rather than RDA being written from scratch and illustrates this with a couple of rules and wordings from both products to compare the differences and similarities. It then moves back to what is essentially an historical account of the 'deconstruction' of AACR2, which is interesting in itself; but it would have been better placed near the start of the chapter to distinguish better between the historical description and the examples from RDA which follow.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/clifford-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 review katrina clifford kingston university library of congress aacr2 archives authority data bibliographic data cataloguing data data set frad frbr information retrieval isbd marc marc21 metadata resource description and access search technology standards video wiki Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1614 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Myths of Innovation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/coelho-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/coelho-rvw#author1">Lina Coelho</a> takes a look at Scott Berkun's challenging view of what innovation and creativity really mean.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The clue is in the title. This book sets out to dispel the myths about creativity and innovation which you have cherished so dearly. It tells you what 'not to do and what not to think' so that you can free yourself from common misguided notions on the subject. As a special bonus, this new paperback edition includes four new chapters which provide the practical tips you would need to help your ideas take off.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/coelho-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 review lina coelho apple google microsoft university of washington bibliographic data internet explorer research search technology video Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1615 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Academic Liaison Librarianship: Curatorial Pedagogy or Pedagogical Curation? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/parsons <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/parsons#author1">Allan Parsons</a> presents a strategic view of the need to develop the academic liaison librarianship role.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3 : Late changes from XHTML review in terms of references -REW 2010-11-18-16-12 --><!-- v3 : Late changes from XHTML review in terms of references -REW 2010-11-18-16-12 --><p>When reflecting on a methodological approach and set of research practices with which he was closely associated, Bruno Latour suggested that, "there are four things that do not work with actor-network theory; the word actor, the word network, the word theory and the hyphen!" [<a href="#1">1</a>]. In a similar vein, it could be suggested that, "there are three things that do not work with academic liaison librarianship: the word academic, the word liaison and the word librarianship". Why so?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/parsons" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article allan parsons dcc open university research information network sconul smithsonian institution university of oxford university of westminster archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing collection development curation data data set database digital curation dublin core e-research framework higher education information society infrastructure managerialism metadata ontologies repositories research taxonomy vocabularies web 2.0 web development Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1588 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developing Infrastructure for Research Data Management at the University of Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author1">James A. J. Wilson</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author2">Michael A. Fraser</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author3">Luis Martinez-Uribe</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author4">Paul Jeffreys</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author5">Meriel Patrick</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author6">Asif Akram</a> and <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author7">Tahir Mansoori</a> describe the approaches taken, findings, and issues encountered while developing research data management services and infrastructure at the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><p>The University of Oxford began to consider research data management infrastructure in earnest in 2008, with the 'Scoping Digital Repository Services for Research Data' Project [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Two further JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee)-funded pilot projects followed this initial study, and the approaches taken by these projects, and their findings, form the bulk of this article.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article asif akram james a. j. wilson luis martinez-uribe meriel patrick michael a. fraser paul jeffreys tahir mansoori ahds dcc google hefce ibm jisc microsoft oxford university computing services research information network uk data archive university of east anglia university of essex university of melbourne university of oxford university of southampton datashare eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih algorithm archives bibliographic data browser cloud computing curation data data management data set database digital asset management digital curation digital repositories e-research flash framework geospatial data gis google maps ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service intellectual property interoperability j2ee jpeg metadata multimedia open access portal preservation provenance qt repositories research research information management schema search technology sharepoint software standards visualisation web 2.0 web portal xml xml schema Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1590 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Fringe 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt#author1">Martin Donnelly</a> (and friends) report on the Repository Fringe "unconference" held at the National e-Science Centre in Edinburgh, Scotland, over 2-3 September 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>2010 was the third year of Repository Fringe, and slightly more formally organised than its antecedents, with an increased number of discursive presentations and less in the way of organised chaos! The proceedings began on Wednesday 1 September with a one-day, pre-event SHERPA/RoMEO API Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] run by the Repositories Support Project team.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report martin donnelly cetis dcc duraspace edina google jisc open university sherpa ukoln university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of hull university of southampton university of st andrews addressing history crispool datashare depositmo hydra jorum memento repomman reposit repositories support project romeo sharegeo sneep wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data blog content management content negotiation csv curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi dspace eprints fedora commons file format framework geospatial data gis google maps hashtag html hypertext identifier infrastructure institutional repository ipad kml learning objects mashup metadata national library oer ontologies open access open source preservation repositories research rss search technology social networks solr standards tagging twitter uri video visualisation wordpress yahoo pipes Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1592 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk CIG Conference 2010: Changes in Cataloguing in 'Interesting Times' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/cig-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/cig-2010-rpt#author1">Rhiannon McLoughlin</a> reports on a three-day conference on cataloguing in a time of financial stringency, held by the CILIP Cataloguing and Indexing Group at Exeter University, from 13-15 September 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The focus of this conference was initiatives to get through the current economic climate. Cataloguing departments are under threat of cutbacks as never before. Papers on streamlining, collaborative enterprises, shared catalogues and services, recycling and repurposing of content using metadata extraction techniques combined to give a flavour of the new thrift driving management. The continuing progress of the long awaited Resource Description and Access (RDA)[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>] towards becoming the new international cataloguing standard was another hot topic.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/cig-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report rhiannon mcloughlin british library british museum cilip google ifla jisc leeds metropolitan university library of congress mla research information network sconul ukoln university of aberdeen university of exeter university of leeds university of strathclyde university of warwick aacr2 aggregation archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cidoc-crm crm data data management digital repositories digitisation ebook frbr google search higher education lcsh learning object metadata learning objects lom marc marc21 metadata ontologies open data open source repositories research resource description and access resource discovery resource sharing schema search technology semantic web software standards vle wiki xml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1595 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Internet Librarian International Conference 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author1">Claire Tylee</a>, <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author2">Katrin Flemming</a> and <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author3">Elly Cope</a> report on the two-day Internet Librarian International Conference focusing on innovation and technology in the information profession, held in London on 14-15 October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Thursday_14_October">Thursday 14 October</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value">Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><h2 id="Thursday_14_October"><a id="thursday" name="thursday"></a>Thursday 14 October</h2> <h2 id="Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value"><a id="thursday-track-a" name="thursday-track-a"></a>Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</h2> <h3 id="A102:_Future_of_Academic_Libraries"><a id="a102" name="a102"></a>A102: Future of Academic Libraries</h3> <h4 id="Mal_Booth_University_of_Technology_Sydney_Australia">Mal Booth, University of Technology Sydney (Australia)</h4> <h4 id="Michael_Jubb_Research_Information_Network_UK">Michael Jubb, Research Information Network (UK)</h4> <p>Mal Booth from the University of Technology Sydney started the session by giving an insight into current plans and projects underway to inform a new library building due to open in 2015 as part of a major redeveloped city campus.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report claire tylee elly cope katrin flemming amazon british library cornell university edina google iso jisc mimas open university portico research information network university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of manchester peprs wikipedia zetoc android archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing content management copyright curation data database digital library digitisation dissemination ejournal facebook flickr frbr higher education identifier infrastructure iphone library data library management systems licence linked data mac os marc mashup metadata microblogging mobile opac open access open source pode preservation qr code research rfid rss search technology semantic web software standards tagging twitter video web 2.0 web browser web portal wiki wordpress youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1596 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 64: Supporting the Power of Research Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 64.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In these cash-strapped times among all the admonitions to save money here, and resources there, I rather hope to hear much about the necessity of protecting and building the knowledge economy if the UK is to make its way in the globalised world, since we cannot pretend to compete easily in other areas of endeavour. Hence research has to be regarded as one of the aces remaining to us, and thus I hope the importance of gathering, managing and preserving for long-term access research outcomes will be widely appreciated and supported.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 editorial richard waller bbc cerlim google ifla intute national library of australia rnib automatic metadata generation itunes u archives bibliographic data bibliographic record big data blog cataloguing curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories digitisation drupal dspace e-science electronic theses fedora commons framework frbr google scholar higher education infrastructure interoperability ipad iphone itunes metadata mobile national library preservation repositories research search technology social networks software standards twitter vim web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1559 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Trove: Innovation in Access to Information in Australia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/holley#author1">Rose Holley</a> describes a major development in the Australian national digital information infrastructure.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In late 2009 the National Library of Australia released version 1 of Trove [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the public. Trove is a free search engine. It searches across a large aggregation of Australian content. The treasure is over 90 million items from over 1000 libraries, museums, archives and other organisations which can be found at the click of a button. Finding information just got easier for many Australians. Exploring a wealth of resources and digital content like never before, including full-text books, journals and newspaper articles, images, music, sound, video, maps, Web sites, diaries, letters, archives, people and organisations has been an exciting adventure for users and the service has been heavily used. Finding and retrieving instantly information in context; interacting with content and social engagement are core features of the service. This article describes Trove features, usage, content building, and its applications for contributors and users in the national context.</p> <h2 id="Opportunities_for_Libraries">Opportunities for Libraries</h2> <p>I see tremendous opportunities for libraries this year because of advances in technology. The changes in technology mean that anyone can create, describe or recommend content, which means that many people and organisations are becoming librarians or libraries in their own way. Librarians should not be threatened or dismayed by this but rather encouraged, since it means that society is retaining its ongoing interest in the creation, organisation and dissemination of content, and we have an integral role to play in these developments. Libraries and librarians are relevant more than ever in this environment because we have vast amounts of data and information to share, a huge amount of information expertise, and an understanding of how technology can assist us in making information more accessible.</p> <p>We need to have new ideas and re-examine our old ideas to see how technology can help us. What things have we always wanted to do that we couldn't before, like providing a single point of access to all Australian information? Is this still pie in the sky or can we now achieve it? Libraries need to think big. As Charles Leadbeater would say 'Libraries need to think they are leading a mass movement, not just serving a clientele.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] Librarians are often thought of as gatekeepers with the emphasis being on closed access, but technology enables gatekeepers to open doors as well as close them and this is the opportunity I see. However many institutions will need to change their strategic thinking from control/shut to free/open before they can make this transition, and take a large dose of courage as well. The American author Harriet Rubin says, 'Freedom is actually a bigger game than power. Power is about what you can control. Freedom is about what you can unleash.' [<a href="#3">3</a>] The National Library of Australia already took this step forward in 2008 with the advent of the Australian Newspapers beta service, which opened up the raw text of digitised Australian newspapers to the public for improvement, without moderation on a mass scale [<a href="#4">4</a>]. With a long history of collaboration across the Australian cultural heritage sector [<a href="#5">5</a>] with regard to digitisation, storage, and service delivery, the National Library of Australia is well placed to take the lead with innovation in access to information.</p> <p>Some people may say, 'But isn't Google doing that, so why do we still need libraries?' There is no question in my mind that libraries are fundamentally different from Google and other similar services. Libraries are different to Google for these reasons: they commit to provide long-term preservation, curation and access to their content; they have no commercial motives in the provision of information (deemed by various library acts); they aim for universal access to everyone in society; and they are 'free for all'. To summarise: libraries are always and forever. Who can say that of a search engine, or of any commercial organisation, regardless of size?</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article rose holley amazon british library google national library of australia oai open library wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data bibliographic database browser copyright curation data database digitisation dissemination doc dublin core facebook flickr ftp google books identifier infrastructure lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh ocr open archives initiative persistent identifier preservation research resource sharing rss search technology tagging twitter usability video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1563 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Retooling Libraries for the Data Challenge http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/salo <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/salo#author1">Dorothea Salo</a> examines how library systems and procedures need to change to accommodate research data.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Eager to prove their relevance among scholars leaving print behind, libraries have participated vocally in the last half-decade's conversation about digital research data. On the surface, libraries would seem to have much human and technological infrastructure ready-constructed to repurpose for data: digital library platforms and institutional repositories may appear fit for purpose. However, unless libraries understand the salient characteristics of research data, and how they do and do not fit with library processes and infrastructure, they run the risk of embarrassing missteps as they come to grips with the data challenge.</p> <p>Whether managing research data is 'the new special collections,'[<a href="#1">1</a>] a new form of regular academic-library collection development, or a brand-new library specialty, the possibilities have excited a great deal of talk, planning, and educational opportunity in a profession seeking to expand its boundaries.</p> <p>Faced with shrinking budgets and staffs, library administrators may well be tempted to repurpose existing technology infrastructure and staff to address the data curation challenge. Existing digital libraries and institutional repositories seem on the surface to be a natural fit for housing digital research data. Unfortunately, significant mismatches exist between research data and library digital warehouses, as well as the processes and procedures librarians typically use to fill those warehouses. Repurposing warehouses and staff for research data is therefore neither straightforward nor simple; in some cases, it may even prove impossible.</p> <h2 id="Characteristics_of_Research_Data">Characteristics of Research Data</h2> <p>What do we know about research data? What are its salient characteristics with respect to stewardship?</p> <h3 id="Size_and_Scope">Size and Scope</h3> <p>Perhaps the commonest mental image of research data is terabytes of information pouring out of the merest twitch of the Large Hadron Collider Project. So-called 'Big Data' both captures the imagination of and creates sheer terror in the practical librarian or technologist. 'Small data,' however, may prove to be the bigger problem: data emerging from individual researchers and labs, especially those with little or no access to grants, or a hyperlocal research focus. Though each small-data producer produces only a trickle of data compared to the like of the Large Hadron Collider Project, the tens of thousands of small-data producers in aggregate may well produce as much data (or more, measured in bytes) as their Big Data counterparts [<a href="#2">2</a>]. Securely and reliably storing and auditing this amount of data is a serious challenge. The burgeoning 'small data' store means that institutions without local Big Data projects are by no means exempt from large-scale storage considerations.</p> <p>Small data also represents a serious challenge in terms of human resources. Best practices instituted in a Big Data project reach all affected scientists quickly and completely; conversely, a small amount of expert intervention in such a project pays immense dividends. Because of the great numbers of individual scientists and labs producing small data, however, immensely more consultations and consultants are necessary to bring practices and the resulting data to an acceptable standard.</p> <h3 id="Variability">Variability</h3> <p>Digital research data comes in every imaginable shape and form. Even narrowing the universe of research data to 'image' yields everything from scans of historical glass negative photographs to digital microscope images of unicellular organisms taken hundreds at a time at varying depths of field so that the organism can be examined in three dimensions. The tools that researchers use naturally shape the resulting data. When the tool is proprietary, unfortunately, so may be the file format that it produced. When that tool does not include long-term data viability as a development goal, the data it produces are often neither interoperable nor preservable.</p> <p>A major consequence of the diversity of forms and formats of digital research data is a concomitant diversity in desired interactions. The biologist with a 3-D stack of microscope images interacts very differently with those images than does a manuscript scholar trying to extract the underlying half-erased text from a palimpsest. These varying affordances <em>must</em> be respected by dissemination platforms if research data are to enjoy continued use.</p> <p>One important set of interactions involves actual changes to data. Many sorts of research data are considerably less usable in their raw state than after they have had filters or algorithms or other processing performed on them. Others welcome correction, or are refined by comparison with other datasets. Two corollaries emerge: first, that planning and acting for data stewardship must take place throughout the research process, rather than being an add-on at the end; and second, that digital preservation systems designed to steward only final, unchanging materials can only fail faced with real-world datasets and data-use practices.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/salo" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article dorothea salo california digital library dcc google oai university of wisconsin hydra algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog collection development cookie curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination drupal dspace dublin core eprints fedora commons file format flickr google docs infrastructure institutional repository interoperability library management systems linked data marc metadata mods oai-pmh open source preservation rdf repositories research search technology software standardisation standards sword protocol wiki xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1566 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk