Overview of content related to 'windows' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/1189/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Augmented Reality in Education: The SCARLET+ Experience http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author1">Laura Skilton</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author2">Matt Ramirez</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author3">Guyda Armstrong</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author4">Rose Lock</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author5">Jean Vacher</a> and <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author6">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> describe augmented reality in education case studies from the University of Sussex and the University for the Creative Arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p style="margin-left:36.0pt;">&nbsp;Augmented reality, a capability that has been around for decades, is shifting from what was once seen as a gimmick to a bona fide game-changer. [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> </blockquote> <p>Augmented Reality (AR) has been listed in the Horizon Reports, key predictors of the potential impact of new technology on education. The 2011 Report [<a href="#1">1</a>] sparked the idea for an innovative project - SCARLET: Special Collections using Augmented Reality to Enhance Learning and Teaching.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article guyda armstrong jean vacher laura skilton marie-therese gramstadt matt ramirez rose lock alt courtauld institute of art glasgow school of art jisc mimas museum of london university for the creative arts university of london university of manchester university of sussex university of the arts london vads jorum kaptur scarlet accessibility archives augmented reality blog copyright data data set digitisation e-learning firefox framework ftp graphics infrastructure internet explorer ipad mobile multimedia oer portal research search technology smartphone url video web browser windows wireless youtube Tue, 11 Jun 2013 17:38:54 +0000 lisrw 2439 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk SUSHI: Delivering Major Benefits to JUSP http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/meehan-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author1">Paul Meehan</a>, <a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author2">Paul Needham</a> and <a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author3">Ross MacIntyre</a> explain the enormous time and cost benefits in using SUSHI to support rapid gathering of journal usage reports into the JUSP service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>A full-scale implementation of the Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) would not be possible without the automated data harvesting afforded by the Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol. Estimated time savings in excess of 97% compared with manual file handling have allowed JUSP to expand its service to more than 35 publishers and 140 institutions by September 2012. An in-house SUSHI server also allows libraries to download quality-checked data from many publishers via JUSP, removing the need to visit numerous Web sites. The protocol thus affords enormous cost and time benefits for the centralised JUSP service and for all participating institutions. JUSP has also worked closely with many publishers to develop and implement SUSHI services, pioneering work to benefit both the publishers and the UK HE community.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-meehan-et-al/jusp-logo.png" style="width: 145px; height: 133px;" title="Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP)" /></p> <h2 id="JUSP:_Background_to_the_Service">JUSP: Background to the Service</h2> <p>The management of journal usage statistics can be an onerous task at the best of times. The introduction of the COUNTER [<a href="#1">1</a>] Code of Practice in 2002 was a major step forward, allowing libraries to collect consistent, audited statistics from publishers. By July 2012, 125 publishers offered the JR1 report, providing the number of successful full-text downloads. In the decade since COUNTER reports became available, analysis of the reports has become increasingly important, with library managers, staff and administrators increasingly forced to examine journal usage to inform and rationalise purchasing and renewal decisions.</p> <p>In 2004, JISC Collections commissioned a report [<a href="#2">2</a>] which concluded that there was a definite demand for a usage statistics portal for the UK HE community; with some sites subscribing to more than 100 publishers, just keeping track of access details and downloading reports was becoming a significant task in itself, much less analysing the figures therein. There followed a report into the feasibility of establishing a ‘Usage Statistics Service’ carried out by Key Perspectives Limited and in 2008 JISC issued an ITT (Invitation To Tender). By early 2009 a prototype service, known as the Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) had been developed by a consortium including Evidence Base at Birmingham City University, Cranfield University, JISC Collections and Mimas at The University of Manchester; the prototype featured a handful of publishers and three institutions. However, despite a centralised service appearing feasible [<a href="#3">3</a>], the requirement to download and process data in spreadsheet format, and the attendant time taken, still precluded a full-scale implementation across UK HE.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="COUNTER" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-meehan-et-al/counter-header.png" style="width: 640px; height: 45px;" title="COUNTER" /></p> <p>Release 3 of the COUNTER Code of Practice in 2009 however mandated the use of the newly-introduced Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol [<a href="#4">4</a>], a mechanism for the machine-to-machine transfer of COUNTER-compliant reports; this produced dramatic efficiencies of time and cost in the gathering of data from publishers. The JUSP team began work to implement SUSHI for a range of publishers and expanded the number of institutions. By September 2012, the service had grown significantly, whilst remaining free at point of use, and encompassed 148 participating institutions, and 35 publishers. To date more than 100 million individual points of data have been collected by JUSP, all via SUSHI, a scale that would have been impossible without such a mechanism in place or without massive additional staff costs.</p> <p>JUSP offers much more than basic access to publisher statistics, however; the JUSP Web site [<a href="#5">5</a>] details the numerous reports and analytical tools on offer, together with detailed user guides and support materials. The cornerstone of the service though is undeniably its SUSHI implementation, both in terms of gathering the COUNTER JR1 and JR1a data and - as developed more recently - its own SUSHI server, enabling institutions to re-harvest data into their own library management tools for local analysis.</p> <h2 id="JUSP_Approach_to_SUSHI_Development_and_Implementation">JUSP Approach to SUSHI Development and Implementation</h2> <p>Once the decision was made to scale JUSP into a full service, the development of SUSHI capability became of paramount importance. The team had been able to handle spreadsheets of data on a small scale, but the expected upscale to 100+ institutions and multiple publishers within a short time frame meant that this would very quickly become unmanageable and costly in staff time and effort - constraints that were proving to be a source of worry at many institutions too: while some sites could employ staff whose role revolved around usage stats gathering and analysis, this was not possible at every institution, nor especially straightforward for institutions juggling dozens, if not hundreds, of publisher agreements and deals.</p> <p>Two main issues were immediately apparent in the development of the SUSHI software. Firstly, there was a lack of any standard SUSHI client software that we could use or adapt, and, more worryingly, the lack of SUSHI support at a number of major publishers. While many publishers use an external company or platform such as Atypon, MetaPress or HighWire to collect and provide usage statistics, others had made little or no progress in implementing SUSHI support by late 2009 - where SUSHI servers were in place these were often untested or unused by consumers.</p> <p>An ultimate aim for JUSP was to develop a single piece of software that would seamlessly interact with any available SUSHI repository and download data for checking and loading into JUSP. However, the only client software available by 2009 was written and designed to work in the Windows environment, or used Java, which can be very complex to work with and of which the JUSP team had limited expertise. The challenge therefore became to develop a much simpler set of code using Perl and/or PHP, common and simple programming languages which were much more familiar to the JUSP team.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/meehan-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article paul meehan paul needham ross macintyre birmingham city university cranfield university elsevier intute jisc jisc collections mimas niso university of manchester university of oxford jusp nesli pirus2 zetoc archives authentication csv data data set database digital library dublin core html identifier interoperability java multimedia openurl passwords perl php portal raptor repositories research shibboleth software standards sushi windows xml Wed, 05 Dec 2012 17:54:19 +0000 lisrw 2396 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk EMTACL12 (Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author1">Sarah Rayner</a> and <a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author2">Olivia Walsby</a> report on a three-day conference on Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries, hosted by NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) in Trondheim, Norway over 1 - 3 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Think_Different">Think Different</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>The three-day conference consisted of eight keynote presentations by invited speakers and a number of parallel sessions. The main themes set out for this year’s conference were supporting research, organisational change within the library, linked open data and other semantic web applications in the library, new literacies, and new services/old services in new clothes, along with other relevant perspectives on emerging technologies.</p> <p>We attended the conference to gain an overview of organisational changes happening across the sector in relation to technological developments and to gather opinion on the relevance of the academic library within a digital society. We also wanted to explore how the future exploitation of new technologies within libraries might have a positive impact on the quality of teaching and learning together with the student experience.</p> <p>This article will summarise a selection of keynote and parallel sessions from across the three days that addressed these issues.</p> <h3 id="October_2012:_Keynotes">1 October 2012: Keynotes</h3> <h2 id="Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</h2> <h3 id="Herbert_Van_de_Sompel_Los_Alamos_National_Laboratory_USA">Herbert Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA</h3> <p>The opening keynote presented by Herbert Van de Sompel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA raised the issues brought about by changes to scholarly communication. Herbert spoke about an increase in dynamic scholarly records that are continually in flux, interdependent, and Web-based, and with which our current infrastructures are unable to cope. With the publication of interdependent and executable papers, research is now a native Web activity; supporting the re-execution of algorithms and the ability to add data at any time (i.e. <a href="http://topicpages.ploscompbiol.org/wiki/Topic_Pages">PLoS Topic Pages</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] <a href="https://peerj.com/">PeerJ</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>]). Herbert pointed out that, as a consequence, we now need to be able to view the state of a scholarly record at certain moments in time; to track back in time to see where findings have come from, and to trace the workflow, and therein lies a challenge for academic libraries.</p> <p>Herbert explained that at present the archive infrastructure is only able to deal with static, non-fluxing research output, that, when using URIs, you will always come to the current version, not prior versions, and that Web archives are not integrated into the Web. As Herbert went on to point out, the key problem is that the Web was created without motion of time; existing in the ‘perpetual now’.</p> <p>Herbert believes that the challenges we face in this new environment are two-fold: archival approaches need to be changed to use a different infrastructure; and we need to reassess how we reference scholarly assets. We have CMS records, Web archives, and caches, but it would be better to trace the history or timeline of a URI. Therefore, Herbert offered some potential tools and solutions; <a href="http://mementoweb.org/">Memento</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>] (started in 2009) allows you to track back to a past version of an item in the Internet archive, bridging current URIs to old URIs from the Internet archive, using a time gate. <a href="http://mementoweb.github.com/SiteStory/" title="SiteStory">SiteStory</a> [<a href="#4">4</a>] is a tool which allows your Web server to take an active part in its own archiving; every request from a user is pushed back to an archive and stored. Therefore, every time material is accessed, it is archived, thereby providing a true history of an object in the archive.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure1-herbert-van-de-sempel-v3.jpg" style="width: 477px; height: 358px;" title="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Herbert Van de Sompel</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>In conclusion, Herbert suggested that archiving needs to be an ongoing activity, tracing every interaction, including archiving links at the time of publication to ensure that the context and history of an evolving piece of research will never be lost.</p> <h2 id="Think_Different">Think Different</h2> <h3 id="Karen_Coyle_Berkeley_CA_USA">Karen Coyle, Berkeley, CA, USA</h3> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure2-karen-coyle-v2.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" title="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Karen Coyle</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>Karen opened by raising a challenge to the way in which libraries are still holding on to outdated practices, such as the librarian’s obsession with alphabetical order, describing it as essentially only ‘an accident of language’ and questioning its continuing relevance given the now pervasive ability to cross-search. Karen continued on this theme citing bibliographic hierarchies such as Dewey as ‘knowledge prevention systems’ which only serve to lock our users into a set view of what's out there.</p> <p>Karen’s introduction led nicely on to the main themes of her presentation: the current role of the library, the need to move away from the view that getting the book into the user’s hand is the end game, and the need to change our attitudes to bibliographic control and linear order. In effect, ‘the library should no longer be about volume and ownership!’. Karen talked about how we should instead focus on <em>how</em> resources are used and what resources should be used <em>together,</em> to inform how we approach provision in the future. Karen believes that the library must become connected to information on the Web, providing more context for our users and thus allowing greater information discovery. Karen argued that the library’s role is no longer simply to gather items into an inventory but to seek to organise information that until now has been inconveniently packaged. She suggested that we need to change our view, to focus on the information and its context, <em>not</em> the objects or books themselves. Karen noted in particular that currently we present nothing within the context of time, reiterating the theme of time travel covered in Herbert’s presentation. So, how can we do this? Karen proposed that we should be able to interrogate catalogues to provide items with context. She gave examples such as <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/">WorldCat</a> [<a href="#5">5</a>], where you can view timelines on people, what they have published and what has been published about them, giving a relative image of their importance.<br /><br />Karen argued that although linked data could prove to be an answer, or could certainly help, we must nonetheless seek to find a range of solutions and technologies. She warned that the pitfall of having an answer is that it stops you asking questions! Karen talked about how libraries must now recognise that bibliographic data are available everywhere, and that what libraries have that is essential and unique are the details on holdings. She proposed that on searching the Web, part of the rich snippet should include information about what the library holds and whether it's available. The Web should be used to direct readers to their library holdings, as well as making use of data such as location information, already being sourced by search engines. Karen’s concluding remarks were that libraries need to look to this new approach (using tools such as <a href="http://Schema.org" target="_blank">Schema.org</a> [<a href="#6">6</a>]) or they will lose visitors, and that if we want to remain visible and relevant, we need to be where our users are - on the Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report olivia walsby sarah rayner jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas ukoln university of bath university of manchester internet archive memento scarlet schema.org worldcat algorithm api archives augmented reality bibliographic control bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing content management data dissemination e-learning ebook framework google docs google maps information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer ipad linked data lod mobile open access research search technology social networks software uri web 2.0 web app windows Thu, 13 Dec 2012 14:42:26 +0000 lisrw 2410 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Walk-in Access to e-Resources at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author1">Kate Robinson</a>, <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author2">Lizz Jennings</a> and <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author3">Laurence Lockton</a> outline a low-cost solution to walk-in (visitor) access to licensed e-journals, drawing on their practice at the University of Bath with a wiki ERM and OPAC terminals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Although the move from print to electronic journals over the last two decades has been enormously beneficial to academic libraries and their users, the shift from owning material outright to renting access has restricted the autonomy of librarians to grant access to these journals.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>Licence restrictions imposed by publishers define and limit access rights and librarians have increasingly taken on the role of restricting access on behalf of the publisher, rather than granting access on behalf of their institution.&nbsp; In other words, librarians and their institutions are no longer free to decide who may read this material as they no longer own it.&nbsp;</p> <p>This situation has been the subject of negotiation for some time, and it is fair to say that an accommodation has been reached in many cases through less restrictive licensing terms.&nbsp; Some clearer definition of groups who can use e-journals has eased the situation for 'authorised users', such as those teaching students of an institution who are not directly employed by the institution itself, for example, through franchised courses.&nbsp; However, there is still a group of potential users who do not have a relationship with an institution other than a wish to access the Library's holdings to further their research or their curiosity.&nbsp; In the past, such access was at the discretion of the Librarian but with regard to e-journals it is now set out in publishers’ licences, usually under the terms of 'walk-in access' to these resources.&nbsp; This in itself is a positive move and seemingly restores some access control to the Librarian.&nbsp; In practice, however, it has not proved to be straightforward to implement.</p> <p>In general terms e-journal access, although via the Web, piggybacks on established University IT systems and safeguards which have not always been specifically designed to support the licence restrictions of publishers.&nbsp; The definition of an authorised user for walk-in access is usually one who has been granted access to the Library building.&nbsp; This requirement for e-journal material to be restricted to the actual library building, not just University premises, presents a technical challenge.&nbsp; It is not reasonable to expect a University's IT infrastructure to be redesigned to accommodate the needs of those who are not part of the institution.&nbsp; However, there is a balance to be struck as a tipping point has been reached, with journal holdings become increasingly e-only and widening participation becoming increasingly important to institutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>There are a growing number of groups who would like would and benefit from walk-in access.&nbsp;&nbsp; In recent years requests for access to e-journals have become more frequent from library users, such as researchers who already use and borrow hard-copy materials through the SCONUL Access scheme, and school/college students undertaking Extended Project or International Baccalaureate qualifications.&nbsp; Clearly it is desirable to support the research community of which we are part, and to encourage EP/IB students whose next steps may well be into Higher Education.&nbsp; Visits for school/college groups are increasingly encouraged at institutional level and often include teaching and other intensive support from library staff; support which increases as the range of material they are authorised to access decreases.&nbsp; Research areas and subjects for these pieces of work are diverse and cannot be easily satisfied through textbook material or residual hard-copy journal holdings.&nbsp; In this climate, we need to look again at how to implement walk-in access to open up resources wherever possible.&nbsp; To do this we first need to take two steps: to identify which online material we can allow access to and to facilitate access through a route which meets licence terms, that is, to this material only within the library building.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up kate robinson laurence lockton lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university sconul ucisa university of bath access control accessibility authentication browser cataloguing collection development data database dublin core ejournal firefox higher education infrastructure institutional repository intranet ldap library management systems licence opac open source opera operating system passwords research resource discovery resource management smartphone solaris url usability web browser wiki windows Fri, 27 Jul 2012 19:10:21 +0000 lisrw 2349 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Third Annual edUi Conference 2011 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/edui-2011-rpt#author1">Danielle Cooley</a> reports on the third annual edUi Conference, held over 13-14 October 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA, an opportunity for Web professionals in colleges, universities, libraries, museums, etc to discuss the latest developments in Web trends and technologies.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The third annual edUi Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held October 13-14, 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA. The sold-out event saw 225 ‘Web professionals serving colleges, universities, libraries, museums, and beyond’ join together to discuss the latest and greatest in Web trends and technologies. The all-volunteer conference was presented by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, and major sponsors included Microsoft, the University of Richmond, and Virginia Commonwealth University.</p> <p>The two-day event consisted of four tracks [<a href="#2">2</a>]:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report danielle cooley google happy cog kansas state university microsoft university of virginia wikipedia accessibility aggregation android archives blog browser cataloguing css data framework google docs google maps graphics higher education html html5 metadata mis mobile research responsive design search technology twitter usability video web standards widget windows xhtml youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 22:26:07 +0000 lisrw 2241 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Piloting Web Conferencing Software: Experiences and Challenges http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/prior-salter <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/prior-salter#author1">Julian Prior</a> and <a href="/issue67/prior-salter#author2">Marie Salter</a> report on their experiences piloting Elluminate Live! at the University of Bath.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>In the current fiscal climate faced by educational institutions in the UK, elearning tools and technologies that promise efficiency savings as well as enhancing the quality and quantity of course offerings are gaining popularity. One such technology is Web conferencing where lectures, seminars, meetings or presentations take place online and allow for remote participation and collaboration via audio, video, instant chat and a virtual 'whiteboard.'[<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/prior-salter" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article julian prior marie salter alt alt-c aston university blackboard google jisc open university qik ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of exeter university of hertfordshire university of winchester samson wikipedia adobe blog browser data e-learning elluminate firefox further education higher education internet explorer java licence mobile moodle multimedia oer open access open source operating system portfolio safari software streaming usb video vle web browser webinar windows Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1623 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Reading Van Gogh Online? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/boot <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/boot#author1">Peter Boot</a> shows how log analysis can be employed to assess a site's usability, usage, and users, using the Van Gogh letter edition as an example.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v5 author edits, revised images and new table 4 : 2011-02-21-17-21 REW --><!-- v5 author edits, revised images and new table 4 : 2011-02-21-17-21 REW --><p>Large amounts of money are spent building scholarly resources on the web. Unlike online retailers, large publishers and banks, scholarly institutions tend not to monitor very closely the way visitors use their web sites. In this article I would like to show that a look at the traces users leave behind in the Web servers' log files can teach us much about our sites' usability and about the way visitors use them.</p> <p>In 2009 the <a href="http://www.huygensinstituut.knaw.nl/">Huygens Institute</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>], together with the <a href="http://www.vangoghmuseum.nl/">Van Gogh Museum</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>], published a new edition of the letters of Vincent van Gogh. The complete edition was <a href="http://vangoghletters.org/vg/">published online</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>], and is accessible for free; there is also a six-volume book edition [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The online edition was reviewed in a number of publications [<a href="#5">5</a>][<a href="#6">6</a>][<a href="#7">7</a>]. I will use the server logs of the Van Gogh edition as an example of what we can learn about our visitors. I will focus not on the simple quantities, but try to assess the visitors' access patterns. When we created the edition, our assumption was that researchers would use the web site, while people who wanted to read the letters would favour the book. The desire to test that assumption was one of the reasons for embarking on this investigation.</p> <p>When users view, or read, editions online, busy traffic is going on between their browser (e.g. Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari), and the web server where the edition is located. Web servers keep logs of this traffic, and inspecting the logs gives us an opportunity to see how people are actually using the editions that we create. When people buy a book, this shows their intention to use it, in some sense. When people go to a web site, the server registers their visit, including, depending on the design of the site, every page they read and every search they do.</p> <p>Most of the work on log analysis in scholarly environments has been done in the context of libraries researching use of electronic journals [<a href="#8">8</a>]. The financial interest in accurate knowledge about usage patterns in that context is obviously important. The LAIRAH (Log Analysis of Digital Resources in the Arts and Humanities) study [<a href="#9">9</a>] used log analysis on portal sites in order to assess usage of digital resources in the arts and humanities. I believe the present article is the first reported study on actual usage data of a scholarly digital edition.</p> <p>First I will discuss why these log data deserve investigation. I then will show what the data that we collect looks like and discuss both their potential and their limitations. I will give a brief overview of the edition site, as the log data can only be understood in the context of the site's structure and navigational facilities. Then I'll show a number of the things that can be done on the basis of the log files.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/boot" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article peter boot google huygens institute for dutch history university college london archives bibliographic data blog browser cache data digital library firefox graphics internet explorer operating system portal research safari search technology usability visualisation windows Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1603 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developments in Virtual 3D Imaging of Cultural Artefacts http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/collmann <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/collmann#author1">Richard Collmann</a> describes how experience using a portable Virtual 3D Object Rig in cultural institutions has led to significant improvements in apparatus design and workflow.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The collapsable, portable electromechanical Virtual 3D (V3D) Object Rig Model 1 (ORm1) (Figures 1, 2, 3) was developed to meet an obvious need found after an important Australian cultural artefact - a nineteenth-century post-mortem plaster head-cast of the notorious bushranger Ned Kelly [<a href="#1">1</a>] - was Apple QTVR-imaged (QuickTime Virtual Reality) using a large static object rig at the University of Melbourne over 2003/4. The author requested that this moving and hyperlinked image be constructed as a multimedia component of a conjectured cross-disciplinary undergraduate teaching unit. The difficulties encountered in obtaining permission from the cultural collection involved to transport this object some 400 metres to the imaging rig located on the same geographical campus suggested to the author that a portable object imaging rig could be devised and taken to any cultural collection anywhere to image objects <em>in situ</em>.</p> <p>In the early to mid-19th century these physical records were taken for phrenological research purposes, however by the late-C19 this quasi-science had been largely discredited. The underlying reasons for these practices had been forgotten; the recording and keeping was absorbed by reason of habit into accepted routine procedure; as just a part of the workflow within the State criminal justice execution process. This procedure would be rejected out of hand nowadays, but this 19th century habit of retaining physical artefacts is fortunate for the present-day cross-disciplinary historian.</p> <p>As mentioned, the author wished to use the head cast as the pivotal focus for cross-disciplinary undergraduate teaching purposes with contributions from the perspective of History of Science, Australian Colonial History, Sociology and Criminology. It was considered by the subject contributors that such a cross-disciplinary teaching module could well benefit from a Web-based multimedia approach.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/collmann" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article richard collmann apple university of melbourne e-curator versi archives copyright data data mining data set database digital media dublin core e-research e-science exif fedora commons flash gnome internet explorer metadata multimedia photoshop preservation provenance quicktime repositories research software visualisation windows wireless Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1606 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Characterising and Preserving Digital Repositories: File Format Profiles http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author1">Steve Hitchcock</a> and <a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author2">David Tarrant</a> show how file format profiles, the starting point for preservation plans and actions, can also be used to reveal the fingerprints of emerging types of institutional repositories.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article david tarrant steve hitchcock amazon google harvard university jisc microsoft mpeg the national archives university of illinois university of northampton university of southampton university of the arts london wellcome library jisc information environment keepit wikipedia accessibility adobe archives bibliographic data blog cloud computing css csv curation data data management database digital curation digital preservation digital repositories dissemination document format droid eprints file format flash flash video framework gif graphics html hypertext identifier institutional repository java jpeg latex linked data metadata mpeg-1 open access open source photoshop php plain text preservation quicktime repositories research schema semantic web software standards vector graphics video web 2.0 wiki windows windows media xml xml schema Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1608 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk International Digital Curation Conference 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on the 6th International Digital Curation Conference, held on 7-8 December 2010 in Chicago.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version v2: final edits after author review 2011-01-12 REW --><!-- version v2: final edits after author review 2011-01-12 REW --><p>The International Digital Curation Conference has been held annually by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) [<a href="#1">1</a>] since 2005, quickly establishing a reputation for high-quality presentations and papers. So much so that, as co-chair Allen Renear explained in his opening remarks, after attending the 2006 Conference in Glasgow [<a href="#2">2</a>] delegates from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) offered to bring the event to Chicago.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report alex ball cni coalition for networked information cornell university datacite dcc indiana university johns hopkins university leiden university massachusetts institute of technology michigan state university national library of australia national science foundation research information network rutgers university ukoln university of arizona university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of chicago university of edinburgh university of illinois university of oxford university of sheffield university of southampton datashare i2s2 idmb myexperiment sagecite sudamih aggregation archives ark authentication blog cataloguing collection development content management curation data data citation data management data model data set database digital curation digital library e-science eprints framework identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability irods linked data linux metadata mobile national library ontologies open access open data operating system persistent identifier preservation preservation metadata provenance rdf repositories research resource description search technology semantic web sharepoint software standards tagging tei text mining twitter video virtual research environment visualisation wiki windows xml Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1611 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Never Waste a Good Crisis: Innovation and Technology in Institutions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/cetis-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/cetis-2010-rpt#author1">Tore Hoel</a> reports on the CETIS 2010 Conference, 15 - 16 November 2010 at the National College for Leadership of Schools and Childrens' Services Conference Centre, Nottingham.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'I get a feeling that we are on a...' [The hands make a gesture to show the stern of a sinking ship].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/cetis-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report tore hoel cetis iso jisc massachusetts institute of technology national university of ireland oslo university college university of bristol university of nottingham university of southampton e-framework wikipedia archimate blog cloud computing creative commons data e-learning facebook framework higher education ict identifier linked data lod machine learning mashup metadata mobile oer open data open source passwords rdf rdfa research search technology semantic web social software sparql standardisation standards uri wiki windows Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1612 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Locating Image Presentation Technology Within Pedagogic Practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> contextualises image presentation technology and methods within a pedagogic framework for the visual arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article marie-therese gramstadt apple blackboard bournemouth university edinburgh college of art google imperial college london jisc jisc digital media microsoft oreilly university for the creative arts university of brighton university of london university of sheffield university of surrey university of the arts london vads pictiva accessibility adobe archives blog browser cataloguing data database digital media e-learning elluminate facebook flash flickr google maps gotomeeting higher education html5 ipad learning design learning objects mac os microsoft office multimedia operating system photoshop podcast portal portfolio research safari screencast software standards usb video vle web 2.0 web resources wiki windows youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1585 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eBooks: Tipping or Vanishing Point? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/tonkin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/tonkin#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> investigates ebooks and takes a look at recent technological and business developments in this area.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Due in large part to the appearance since mid-2006 of increasingly affordable devices making use of e-Ink technology (a monochrome display supporting a high-resolution image despite low battery use, since the screen consumes power only during page refreshes, which in the case of ebooks generally represent page turns), the ebook has gone from a somewhat limited market into a real, although presently still niche, contender. Amazon sold 500,000 Kindles in 2008 [<a href="#1">1</a>]; Sony sold 300,000 of its Reader Digital Book model between October 2006 and October 2009. In September 2009, ebooks represented between 1% and 3% of the total US publishing market [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p>Following the JISC National eBooks Observatory Study [<a href="#3">3</a>] in the UK, one participant, David Nicolas, was quoted as stating that ebooks have 'reached the tipping point' [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Keeping in mind Bohr's statement that, 'prediction is very difficult, especially about the future', it's nonetheless safe to say that publicity about these devices is currently at a high point. But for ebook readers, as Figure 1 shows, this is not their first time in the spotlight.</p> <blockquote><p>"A good book has no ending. ~R.D. Cumming"</p></blockquote> <p>This article marks the third time that <em>Ariadne</em> has discussed the subject of ebooks, namely "Ebooks in UK Libraries: Where are we now?" [<a href="#5">5</a>] and "e-Books for the Future: Here But Hiding?" [<a href="#6">6</a>]. There is something very beguiling about the idea of a book that has 'the marvelous chameleon-like quality that it can very quickly be made to substitute for a different printed work by simply loading different content' [<a href="#7">7</a>] - a book that can play the role of a <em>library</em>.</p> <p>As Striphas [<a href="#8">8</a>] points out, the concept of the electronic book, and the exploration of the interaction between the size of a container and the quantity of knowledge held, has an extraordinarily long history. He traces the idea back to the creation of miniature manuscript books, composed of 'tiny handwriting, or micrographia', in the late 15th century, which were functional objects and could be read by means of a magnifying glass.</p> <p>Striphas notes the development of microphotography techniques in the 19th century. This was initially pioneered by John Benjamin Dancer, an optical instrument-maker who combined microscope and camera in order to create the earliest example of microphotography on record [<a href="#9">9</a>]. Luther reports that 'the 21 May 1853 issue of Notes and Queries carried a letter from a Dublin scholar asking "May not photography be usefully applied to the making of catalogues of large libraries?' Microphotography led to the report in the British <em>Photographic Journal</em> of, 'A page of printing, from Quekett's "Treatise on the Microscope", reduced to such size that the whole of the volume of 560 pages could be contained in a space one inch long and half-an-inch broad ' [<a href="#8">8</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/tonkin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article emma tonkin amazon american library association apple british library google international digital publishing forum iso jisc massachusetts institute of technology microsoft ukoln university of bath university of chicago wikipedia aac access control accessibility adobe android blog bmp cataloguing copyright data digital library doc document format drm ebook epub file format flac flash gif html hypertext infrastructure ipad iphone itunes jpeg jpg linux mis mobi mobile mobile phone mp3 ogg open access operating system plain text png research rtf search technology smartphone software standardisation standards tiff usb windows wireless Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1529 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Share. Collaborate. Innovate. Building an Organisational Approach to Web 2.0 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/bevan <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/bevan#author1">Paul Bevan</a> outlines the National Library of Wales' development of a strategic approach to meeting user needs in a post-Web 2.0 world.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The National Library of Wales has recently published a new Strategy for the Web [<a href="#1">1</a>] which integrates Web 2.0 with the existing Web portfolio and seeks to provide an approach to Web 2.0 which is focused on the organisation. Rather than centring on technical developments, this paper outlines a strategic research approach and discusses some of the outcomes which may speak to others seeking to engage with emerging Web technologies and approaches.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/bevan" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article paul bevan bbc google national library of wales archives blog cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data digital media digitisation facebook flickr framework google analytics html ict infrastructure licence metadata mobile mobile phone national library open source portfolio research search engine optimisation search technology software tagging twitter url video web 2.0 web app web services windows youtube Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1506 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Search Engines: Real-time Search http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> looks at the concept of real-time search and points to some of the functionality that users can and should expect to find when exploring these engines.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article phil bradley google microsoft archives avatar blog cloud computing data database facebook flickr hashtag html microblogging rss search technology tag cloud twitter url ustream video windows youtube Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1507 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Ajax in Oracle JDeveloper http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/cliff-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/cliff-rvw#author1">Pete Cliff</a> finds aspects of this work useful and interesting, but he also expresses some serious reservations.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Asynchronous Javascript and XML (AJAX) programming technique enables one to update parts of a Web site without reloading the entire page. So useful is it that AJAX is turning up all over the Web, including on my own Web-based archival interfaces; so it was timely that I should be asked to review <em>Ajax in Oracle JDeveloper</em>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/cliff-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 review pete cliff google oracle university of oxford ajax apache api atom cd-rom database framework google books java javascript operating system php rss software windows xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1518 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Repositories for Creative and Applied Arts Research: The Kultur Project http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/gray <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/gray#author1">Andrew Gray</a> discusses institutional repositories and the creative and applied arts specifically in relation to the JISC-funded Kultur Project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Those involved in Higher Education (HE) may have started to sense the approach of Institutional Repositories (IRs). Leaving aside the unfortunate nomenclature, IRs are becoming a fact of life in many educational institutions. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) has invested £14million in the Repositories and Preservation Programme [<a href="#1">1</a>] and the recent Repositories and Preservation Programme Meeting in Birmingham [<a href="#2">2</a>] celebrated the end of over 40 individual repository projects under the Start Up and Enhancement [<a href="#3">3</a>] strand.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/gray" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article andrew gray google jisc monash university university for the creative arts university of southampton university of the arts london vads archives avi blog copyright data digital repositories digitisation dissemination eprints flash framework ftp google docs higher education institutional repository intellectual property jpeg metadata mp3 multimedia open access photoshop preservation provenance quicktime rae repositories research schema software standards streaming tiff url usability video wav windows windows media Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1489 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Spinning a Semantic Web for Metadata: Developments in the IEMSR http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/tonkin-strelnikov <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/tonkin-strelnikov#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> and <a href="/issue59/tonkin-strelnikov#author2">Alexey Strelnikov</a> reflect on the experience of developing components for the Information Environment Metadata Schema Registry.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 2: incorporating Emma's final edits :REW --><!-- version 2: incorporating Emma's final edits :REW --><p>The IEMSR, a metadata schema registry, exists to support the development and use of metadata standards; in practice, what does this entail?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/tonkin-strelnikov" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article alexey strelnikov emma tonkin ansi d-lib magazine ieee ilrt iso jisc niso ukoln university of bath w3c iemsr jisc information environment accessibility aggregation api application profile archives copyright data data model data set database dcap dcmi dissemination dublin core dublin core metadata initiative framework frbr graphics html ieee lom internet explorer interoperability java jena knowledge base learning object metadata learning objects lom metadata metadata model metadata schema registry open source rdf repositories research resource description schema search technology semantic web software sparql standardisation standards sword protocol thesaurus url usability vocabularies web standards windows xml Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1471 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Get Tooled Up: Staying Connected: Technologies Supporting Remote Workers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/guy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Having considered organisational issues in her previous article, <a href="/issue57/guy#author1">Marieke Guy</a> takes a look at the many technologies that support remote working, from broadband to Web 2.0 social networking tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/guy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article marieke guy bbc google jisc microsoft ukoln university of aberdeen university of bath university of london internet archive powr wikipedia adobe archives authentication blog browser data database dissemination e-learning eportfolio facebook flickr google docs higher education infrastructure jabber microblogging mobile mobile phone mp3 multimedia operating system passwords podcast portfolio preservation remote working repositories research search technology smartphone social networks software standards streaming twitter usability video videoconferencing web 2.0 web app web development web resources wiki windows wireless wordpress youtube Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Custom-built Search Engines http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue55/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> reviews a means of enhancing the relevance of search results through the use of custom-built search engines.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 feature article phil bradley google microsoft blog cloud computing data database google search html pageflakes passwords search technology tag cloud url web 2.0 windows Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1384 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developing the Capability and Skills to Support EResearch http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/henty <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue55/henty#author1">Margaret Henty</a> provides an Australian perspective on improving the environment in which eResearch is conducted through developing institutional capability and providing appropriate skills training.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The growing capacity of ICT to contribute to research of all kinds has excited researchers the world over as they invent new ways of conducting research and enjoy the benefits of bigger and more sophisticated computers and communications systems to support measurement, analysis, collaboration and publishing. The expanding rate of ICT development is matched by the numbers of people wanting to join in this funfest, by growth in the amount of data being generated, and by demands for new and improved hardware, software, networks, and data storage.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/henty" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 feature article margaret henty american library association australian national university microsoft national science foundation ukoln university of arizona university of bath university of melbourne university of queensland university of sydney dealing with data archives copyright curation data data management data mining database digital library digitisation dublin core e-research e-science gis higher education ict identifier infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property learning objects linux marc metadata open access portal preservation privacy repositories research software tiff video visualisation wiki windows xml Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1388 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Saving Energy in the Workplace http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/young <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/young#author1">Eddie Young</a> outlines some of the issues faced by a Systems Administrator when trying to save energy in the workplace.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/young" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 feature article eddie young apple bbc eduserv ukoln university of bath iwmw wikipedia blog data open source operating system podcast research second life software solaris usb video wiki windows Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1373 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Video Active Consortium: Europe's Television History Online http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras#author1">Johan Oomen</a> and <a href="/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras#author2">Vassilis Tzouvaras</a> provide an insight into the background and development of the Video Active Portal which offers access to television heritage material from leading archives across Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Europe's audiovisual heritage contains both a record and a representation of the past and as such it demonstrates the development of the 'audiovisual culture' we inhabit today. In this article we hope to offer an insight into the development of the Video Active Portal [<a href="#1">1</a>] which provides access broadcast heritage material retained by archives across Europe. We will explain how Video Active needed to find solutions for managing intellectual property rights, semantic and linguistic interoperability and the design of a meaningful user experience.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article johan oomen vassilis tzouvaras apple google iso mpeg national technical university of athens netherlands institute for sound and vision oai royal holloway university of london university of utrecht w3c api archives data data management database digital archive digital library digitisation dublin core dublin core metadata initiative dvd flash framework hypertext ict information architecture infrastructure intellectual property interoperability itunes java jena learning objects metadata multimedia mysql oai-pmh ontologies open archives initiative open source owl portal preservation rdf rdfs repositories research resource description schema search technology semantic web sesame sparql standardisation standards streaming thesaurus video vocabularies web app web services windows windows media xml xml schema youtube Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1348 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ECDL 2007 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/ecdl-2007-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/ecdl-2007-rpt#author1">Mahendra Mahey</a>, <a href="/issue53/ecdl-2007-rpt#author2">Emma Tonkin</a> and <a href="/issue53/ecdl-2007-rpt#author3">Robert John Robertson</a> report on the 2007 European Conference on Research and Advanced Technology for Digital Libraries, held in Budapest, Hungary, over 16-22 September, 2007.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This was the first time this event was held in the majestic and architecturally impressive city of Budapest. It was organised by The Computer and Automation Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA SZTAKI) [<a href="#1">1</a>] and held at the Europa Congress Centre.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/ecdl-2007-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 event report emma tonkin mahendra mahey robert john robertson cetis dcc iso jisc ukoln university of bath university of glasgow university of liverpool university of strathclyde university of wales jisc information environment accessibility aggregation controlled vocabularies data database dcmi digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories dspace ebook framework identifier information retrieval information society infrastructure interoperability library management systems linux medical subject headings metadata multimedia ocr ontologies operating system preservation repositories research search technology software tagging thesaurus vocabularies web 2.0 windows wireless xml Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1357 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Newsline http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h3 id="TASI_Workshops_in_November_and_December">TASI Workshops in November &amp; December</h3> <p>There are currently places available on the following Nov/Dec workshops:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 news and events shirley keane ahrc british library cilip cni coalition for networked information dcc deutsches filminstitut emory university google humboldt university berlin imperial college london jisc kings college london mla national library of the netherlands oai oais oclc tasi the national archives ukoln university college london university of bristol university of cambridge university of glasgow university of manchester university of nottingham university of oxford university of southampton datashare jisc information environment repositories research team repositories support project rosa rsp accessibility application profile archives authentication bibliographic data bibliometrics blog cloud computing copyright curation data data mining data set digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dissemination dspace e-learning e-research e-science ebook eprints fedora commons foi framework graphics html identifier information society infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property interoperability intranet learning objects linked data linux mashup metadata microformats national library open access open data open source operating system personalisation photoshop portal preservation privacy repositories research rss search technology second life semantic web soa social networks software tagging taxonomy usability visualisation web 2.0 wiki windows xml Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1646 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 24 Hour Museum: From Past to Future http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/pratty <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>As 24 Hour Museum rebuilds and looks outwards to new partnerships, <a href="/issue52/pratty#author1">Jon Pratty</a> looks at challenges faced over the last seven years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>24 Hour Museum [<a href="#1">1</a>] is a successful and sustainable cultural Web site. Type the word 'museum' into Google UK and up it pops as a top five search result. Unlike the other top sites, all national museums or galleries, 24HM's remit covers the whole country, in eclectic subject areas, reaching a wide variety of audiences with simple and accessible content.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/pratty" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 feature article jon pratty ahrc bbc google mla oai university of cambridge university of leicester wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives content management data database digital media further education html infrastructure interoperability knowledge management metadata portal research rss search technology semantic web soap software syndication tagging url vocabularies web 2.0 web services widget windows xml Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1331 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Towards Virtualisation: A New Approach in Server Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/young-thrower <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/young-thrower#author1">Eddie Young</a> provides an account of trials and implementations carried out here after Matt Thrower gives us the background and benefits of employing virtualisation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/young-thrower" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 feature article eddie young ibm massachusetts institute of technology microsoft ukoln university of cambridge apache blog data fedora commons free software infrastructure knowledge base linux open source operating system research search technology software solaris ssh standards wiki windows Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1312 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Models of Early Adoption of ICT Innovations in Higher Education http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/oppenheim-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue50/oppenheim-et-al#author1">Melanie Bates</a>, <a href="/issue50/oppenheim-et-al#author2">Sue Manuel</a> and <a href="/issue50/oppenheim-et-al#author3">Charles Oppenheim</a> provide an overview of some considerations for change agents attempting to introduce an innovative new information communication technology service into Higher Education institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/oppenheim-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 feature article charles oppenheim melanie king sue manuel jisc loughborough university data dissemination e-government e-learning framework higher education ict identifier information society infrastructure operating system repositories research social networks vle web development windows Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1287 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk New Search Engines in 2006 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue50/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> takes a look at some of the search engines that he noticed in 2006 and provides quick assessments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 feature article phil bradley american library association bbc cilip google nhs wikipedia algorithm blog cloud computing creative commons data ebook privacy research search technology tag cloud url video windows zip Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1289 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Take a Peek Beneath the EPrints V3 Wrappers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/eprints-v3-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>With v3 officially launched at the Open Repositories Conference in San Antonio last week, <a href="/issue50/eprints-v3-rpt#author1">William Nixon</a> and <a href="/issue50/eprints-v3-rpt#author2">Peter Millington</a> report on the EPrints 3 pre-launch briefing in London, 8 December 2006.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/eprints-v3-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 event report peter millington william nixon google jisc oai sherpa university of glasgow university of nottingham university of southampton romeo zetoc apache api archives atom bibliographic data data database digital library dspace dublin core eprints flash gif google maps javascript ldap metadata mets multimedia mysql quicktime refworks repositories research rss search technology software usability video wiki windows xml Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1298 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Considering a Marketing and Communications Approach for an Institutional Repository http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/gierveld <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue49/gierveld#author1">Heleen Gierveld</a> proposes a market-oriented approach to increase the rate of deposit to an institutional repository.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Institutional Repositories (IR) are a result of the vision to collect, secure, and provide access to scholarly publications in a novel, digital way, mostly initiated by the institutional library. Various factors have contributed to the emergence of these repositories, including technological innovations which allow a new form of collection management of a university's output, the desire to counteract the 'serials crisis', and the opportunity of promoting wide dissemination and quick access to publications.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/gierveld" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue49 feature article heleen gierveld arl california digital library cni d-lib magazine jisc massachusetts institute of technology sherpa techne press romeo accessibility archives copyright data data set database digital library digital object identifier digitisation dissemination doi framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata open access portal preservation repositories research search technology thesaurus url windows Mon, 30 Oct 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1270 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Video Streaming of Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/tourte-tonkin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue49/tourte-tonkin#author2">Greg Tourte</a> and <a href="/issue49/tourte-tonkin#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> describe the set-up and use of video streaming technology at the IWMW 2006 event.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The recent Institutional Web Management Workshop (<a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/webmaster-2006/">IWMW 2006</a>) [<a href="#1">1</a>] was a rare opportunity to try out a few new pieces of technology. With events that occur at a different location each year, it is often difficult to do so, since the infrastructure at the venue may not be suitable, and it is difficult to liase effectively with technical staff at the venue before the event in order to put all the necessary technology into place.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/tourte-tonkin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue49 feature article emma tonkin greg tourte apache software foundation apple bbc ieee microsoft mpeg ukoln university of bath iwmw wikipedia algorithm asf avi cache codec data dvd file format flash flash video gpl graphics h.263 h.264 infrastructure interoperability licence linux mac os mp3 mpeg-1 mpeg-2 mpeg-4 multimedia ogg ogg theora preservation quicktime research software standards streaming theora usability video video codec video encoding web development windows windows media wireless wmv Mon, 30 Oct 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1274 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Digitising an Archive: The Factory Approach http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/burbridge <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue47/burbridge#author1">Duncan Burbidge</a> describes a new approach to digitising an archive both as a future-proof substitute and for Web delivery.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The FP6 PrestoSpace Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] aims to develop systems that will permit quick, efficient and economically accessible preservation of analogue media [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/burbridge" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 feature article duncan burbidge apple mpeg archives audio codec avi browser codec copyright data database digitisation drm flash ftp metadata mp3 mpeg-1 mpeg-2 mpeg-4 multimedia preservation quicktime software standards video video codec wav web browser windows windows media Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1227 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Folksonomies: The Fall and Rise of Plain-text Tagging http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/tonkin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue47/tonkin#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> suggests that rising new ideas are often on their second circuit - and none the worse for that.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Despite the stability of many key technologies underlying today's Internet, venerable workhorses such as TCP/IP and HTTP, the rise of new candidate specifications frequently leads to a sort of collaborative manic depression. Every now and then, a new idea comes along and sparks a wave of interest, the first stage in the Internet hype cycle.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/tonkin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 feature article emma tonkin amazon apple d-lib magazine google jisc massachusetts institute of technology ukoln access control algorithm amazon web services archives ascii blog browser controlled vocabularies copyright data data mining data set database digital repositories document management doi dublin core eprints exif institutional repository interoperability linux metadata microformats mobile mp3 operating system provenance rdf repositories research resource discovery search technology semantic web semiotic simple dublin core software standardisation standards tagging uri usability vocabularies web 2.0 web services windows xhtml Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1233 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Accessibility: The Current Situation and New Directions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/carey <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue44/carey#author1">Kevin Carey</a> describes accessibility by disabled people to digital information systems across broadcasting, telecommunications and the Internet, looks into the future and makes recommendations.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h3 id="Accessibility_and_Usability">Accessibility and Usability</h3> <p>Before embarking on the major strands of my argument it would be as well to consider definitions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/carey" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue44 feature article kevin carey apple becta city university london microsoft nesta jisc information environment accessibility aggregation avatar browser data document format dvd framework gif graphics intellectual property metadata mobile mobile phone multimedia operating system research search technology sms software standards taxonomy usability video windows Fri, 29 Jul 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1160 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Accessibility Revealed: The Museums, Libraries and Archives Council Audit http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/petrie-weisen <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue44/petrie-weisen#author1">Marcus Weisen</a>, <a href="/issue44/petrie-weisen#author2">Helen Petrie</a>, <a href="/issue44/petrie-weisen#author3">Neil King</a> and <a href="/issue44/petrie-weisen#author4">Fraser Hamilton</a> describe a comprehensive Web accessibility audit involving extensive user testing as well as automatic testing of Web sites.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 2004, the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) commissioned a Web accessibility audit from City University London. MLA is the national development agency working for and on behalf of museums, libraries and archives in England and advising government on policy and priorities for the sector. The audit was inspired by a study conducted by City University London in 2003/2004 on the accessibility of 1,000 general Web sites for the Disability Rights Commission (DRC) [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/petrie-weisen" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue44 feature article fraser hamilton helen petrie marcus weisen neil king alt city university london mla ukoln university of leicester web accessibility initiative accessibility archives browser data digitisation e-government framework graphics higher education html ict plain text research software wcag web development web services windows Fri, 29 Jul 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1162 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Installing Shibboleth http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/mcleish <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue43/mcleish#author1">Simon McLeish</a> describes the experience of Shibboleth installation in a Higher Education environment, and suggests ways to make this experience more user-friendly.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="What_and_Why_Is_Shibboleth">What and Why Is Shibboleth?</h2> <p>One of the major issues that faces all today's Internet users is identity management: how to prove to a Web site that you are who you claim you are, and do so securely enough to prevent someone else being able to convince the Web site that they are you. There are many initiatives attacking the problem, with approaches both technical and legal.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/mcleish" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 tooled up simon mcleish edina eduserv google london school of economics microsoft mimas perseus sdss access control apache archives authentication cookie data fedora commons higher education infrastructure institutional repository ldap licence linux metadata open source passwords portal repositories research saml schema search technology shibboleth software standards tomcat wiki windows xml Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1148 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Virtual Rooms, Real Meetings http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/powell <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue41/powell#author1">Andy Powell</a> takes a brief look at VRVS, a desktop video-conferencing tool that can be used to support collaborative activities between groups of geographically distributed researchers.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>As a child I can remember watching an episode of <em>Tomorrow's World</em> (the BBC's weekly popular science programme of the time) [<a href="#1">1</a>] that showed the use of a video phone and how people would soon actually be able to see the person to whom they were talking.&nbsp; "Wow," I thought, "that is the future."</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/powell" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue41 tooled up andy powell bbc jisc ukerna ukoln university of manchester browser further education infrastructure java linux mobile operating system passwords quicktime research software url video videoconferencing windows Fri, 29 Oct 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1089 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="headlines"></a> <a name="events"></a><a name="news"></a></p> <h3 id="Hyper_Clumps_Mini_Clumps_and_National_Catalogues..."><a name="events0"></a>Hyper Clumps, Mini Clumps and National Catalogues...</h3> <p>The JISC-funded CC-interop Project completed its work during 2004 and now is holding an event to disseminate the key findings of the project. The project built on the work of the successful eLib Phase 3 "Clumps" projects and investigated three broad areas to inform about interoperability between physical and distributed union catalogues. Find out about:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue41 news and events richard waller ahds austrian national library becta british library edina jisc kings college london manchester metropolitan university mimas mla museum of london tasi the national archives university of edinburgh university of manchester university of oxford cc-interop elib gnu jisc information environment jorum l2l worldcat aggregation algorithm apache archives atom authentication cataloguing collection development copac copyright data database digital library digital preservation digitisation e-learning ebook framework free software further education gnu lesser general public license groovy html ict infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property interoperability knowledge base knowledge management learning objects licence linux mac os metadata multimedia mysql namespace national library openurl perl personalisation portal preservation rdf repositories research resource discovery rss rtf search technology software standards streaming tagging url video windows xml xsl z39.50 Fri, 29 Oct 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1098 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk