Overview of content related to 'dest' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/12212/0?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Abstract Modelling of Digital Identifiers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/nicholas-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/nicholas-et-al#author1">Nick Nicholas</a>, <a href="/issue62/nicholas-et-al#author2">Nigel Ward</a> and <a href="/issue62/nicholas-et-al#author3">Kerry Blinco</a> present an information model of digital identifiers, to help bring clarity to the vocabulary debates from which this field has suffered.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2, incorporating author review edits inc. lead-ins to bullet lists - 2010-02-12-19-30-rew--><!-- v2, incorporating author review edits inc. lead-ins to bullet lists - 2010-02-12-19-30-rew--><p>Discussion of digital identifiers, and persistent identifiers in particular, has often been confused by differences in underlying assumptions and approaches. To bring more clarity to such discussions, the PILIN Project has devised an abstract model of identifiers and identifier services, which is presented here in summary. Given such an abstract model, it is possible to compare different identifier schemes, despite variations in terminology; and policies and strategies can be formulated for persistence without committing to particular systems. The abstract model is formal and layered; in this article, we give an overview of the distinctions made in the model. This presentation is not exhaustive, but it presents some of the key concepts represented, and some of the insights that result.</p> <p>The main goal of the Persistent Identifier Linking Infrastructure (PILIN) project [<a href="#1">1</a>] has been to scope the infrastructure necessary for a national persistent identifier service. There are a variety of approaches and technologies already on offer for persistent digital identification of objects. But true identity persistence cannot be bound to particular technologies, domain policies, or information models: any formulation of a persistent identifier strategy needs to outlast current technologies, if the identifiers are to remain persistent in the long term.</p> <p>For that reason, PILIN has modelled the digital identifier space in the abstract. It has arrived at an ontology [<a href="#2">2</a>] and a service model [<a href="#3">3</a>] for digital identifiers, and for how they are used and managed, building on previous work in the identifier field [<a href="#4">4</a>] (including the thinking behind URI [<a href="#5">5</a>], DOI [<a href="#6">6</a>], XRI [<a href="#7">7</a>] and ARK [<a href="#8">8</a>]), as well as semiotic theory [<a href="#9">9</a>]. The ontology, as an abstract model, addresses the question 'what is (and isn't) an identifier?' and 'what does an identifier management system do?'. This more abstract view also brings clarity to the ongoing conversation of whether URIs can be (and should be) universal persistent identifiers.</p> <h2 id="Identifier_Model">Identifier Model</h2> <p>For the identifier model to be abstract, it cannot commit to a particular information model. The notion of an identifier depends crucially on the understanding that an identifier only identifies one distinct thing. But different domains will have different understandings of what things are distinct from each other, and what can legitimately count as a single thing. (This includes aggregations of objects, and different versions or snapshots of objects.) In order for the abstract identifier model to be applicable to all those domains, it cannot impose its own definitions of what things are distinct: it must rely on the distinctions specific to the domain.</p> <p>This means that information modelling is a critical prerequisite to introducing identifiers to a domain, as we discuss elsewhere [<a href="#10">10</a>]: identifier users should be able to tell whether any changes in a thing's content, presentation, or location mean it is no longer identified by the same identifier (i.e. whether the identifier is restricted to a particular version, format, or copy).</p> <p>The abstract identifier model also cannot commit to any particular protocols or service models. In fact, the abstract identifier model should not even presume the Internet as a medium. A sufficiently abstract model of identifiers should apply just as much to URLs as it does to ISBNs, or names of sheep; the model should not be inherently digital, in order to avoid restricting our understanding of identifiers to the current state of digital technologies. This means that our model of identifiers comes close to the understanding in semiotics of signs, as our definitions below make clear.</p> <p>There are two important distinctions between digital identifiers and other signs which we needed to capture. First, identifiers are managed through some system, in order to guarantee the stability of certain properties of the identifier. This is different to other signs, whose meaning is constantly renegotiated in a community. Those identifier properties requiring guarantees include the accountability and persistence of various facets of the identifier—most crucially, what is being identified. For digital identifiers, the <strong>identifier management system</strong> involves registries, accessed through defined services. An HTTP server, a PURL [<a href="#11">11</a>] registry, and an XRI registry are all instances of identifier management systems.</p> <p>Second, digital identifiers are straightforwardly <strong>actionable</strong>: actions can be made to happen in connection with the identifier. Those actions involve interacting with computers, rather than other people: the computer consistently does what the system specifies is to be done with the identifier, and has no latitude for subjective interpretation. This is in contrast with human language, which can involve complex processes of interpretation, and where there can be considerable disconnect between what a speaker intends and how a listener reacts. Because the interactions involved are much simpler, the model can concentrate on two actions which are core to digital identifiers, but which are only part of the picture in human communication: working out what is being identified (<em>resolution</em>), and accessing a representation of what is identified (<em>retrieval</em>).</p> <p>So to model managing and acting on digital identifiers, we need a concept of things that can be identified, names for things, and the relations between them. (Semiotics already gives us such concepts.) We also need a model of the systems through which identifiers are managed and acted on; what those systems do, and who requests them to do so; and what aspects of identifiers the systems manage.</p> <p>Our identifier model (as an ontology) thus encompasses:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Entities</strong> - including actors and identifier systems;</li> <li><strong>Relations</strong> between entities;</li> <li><strong>Qualities</strong>, as desirable properties of entities. Actions are typically undertaken in order to make qualities apply to entities.</li> <li><strong>Actions</strong>, as the processes carried out on entities (and corresponding to <strong>services</strong> in implementations);</li> </ul> <p>An individual identifier system can be modelled using concepts from the ontology, with an identifier system model.</p> <p>In the remainder of this article, we go through the various concepts introduced in the model under these classes. We present the concept definitions under each section, before discussing issues that arise out of them. <em>Resolution</em> and <em>Retrieval</em> are crucial actions for identifiers, whose definition involves distinct issues; they are discussed separately from other Actions. We briefly discuss the standing of HTTP URIs in the model at the end.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/nicholas-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article kerry blinco nick nicholas nigel ward d-lib magazine dest ietf oasis internet archive aggregation archives ark ascii browser cataloguing cool uri cordra curation data database digital object identifier dns document management doi e-learning ftp identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects metadata mobile mobile phone namespace ontologies openurl persistent identifier purl repositories research rfc search technology semantic web semiotic service usage model uri url vocabularies wayback machine web browser xml xml namespaces Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1528 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk e-Framework Implements New Workplan http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/dolphin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/dolphin#author1">Ian Dolphin</a> and <a href="/issue59/dolphin#author2">Phil Nicholls</a> describe recent and forthcoming developments from the e-Framework Partnership for Education and Research.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/dolphin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article ian dolphin phil nicholls amazon deewr dest jisc oreilly sakai university of bolton university of hull university of sheffield e-framework wikipedia data digital library e-learning framework ict infrastructure interoperability operating system preservation repositories research service oriented architecture soa software standards twitter uportal Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1465 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Supporting eResearch: The Victorian eResearch Strategic Initiative http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/borda <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue58/borda#author1">Ann Borda</a> reports on the Victorian eResearch Strategic Initiative (VeRSI).</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- This version is version index-v3.html being the implementation of edits missed in the final revised author file - REW --><!-- This version is version index-v3.html being the implementation of edits missed in the final revised author file - REW --><p>The Victorian eResearch Strategic Initiative (VeRSI) [<a href="#1">1</a>] was the first State-funded initiative of its kind in Australia.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/borda" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue58 feature article ann borda deewr dest jisc monash university university of melbourne versi archives authentication data data management data set database dissemination e-research e-science framework ict infrastructure multimedia mysql open source research shibboleth software video visualisation web 2.0 wiki Fri, 30 Jan 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1449 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Copyright Angst, Lust for Prestige and Cost Control: What Institutions Can Do to Ease Open Access http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/waaijers-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/waaijers-et-al#author1">Leo Waaijers</a> writes about copyright, prestige and cost control in the world of open access while in two appendices Bas Savenije and Michel Wesseling compare the costs of open access publishing and subscriptions/licences for their respective institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 3 to accept 3 post-edits from author 2008-11-06 rew --><!-- version 3 to accept 3 post-edits from author 2008-11-06 rew --><p>The view that the results of publicly financed research should also be publicly accessible enjoys broad support in the academic community. Where their own articles are concerned, however, many authors hesitate to circulate them openly, for example by publishing them in Open Access journals or placing them in their institution's repository. They ask themselves whether that will not be at odds with the copyright rules and whether they will gain – or perhaps even lose – prestige.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/waaijers-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article leo waaijers michel wesseling dest elsevier google jisc lund university sherpa stm university of nottingham university of utrecht repec romeo wikipedia accessibility aggregation algorithm archives copyright database digitisation dissemination google scholar higher education licence metadata open access passwords repositories research sfx software standards Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1429 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ARROW and the RQF: Meeting the Needs of the Research Quality Framework Using an Institutional Research Repository http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/groenewegen-treloar <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue52/groenewegen-treloar#author1">David Groenewegen</a> and <a href="/issue52/groenewegen-treloar#author2">Andrew Treloar</a> describe the role of repositories in the forthcoming Australian Research Quality Framework (RQF) and the responses of the ARROW Project to the needs of the RQF.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This paper describes the work of the ARROW Project to meet the requirements of the forthcoming Research Quality Framework (RQF). The RQF is an Australian Federal Government initiative designed to measure the quality and impact of Australian research, and is based partly on the existing Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) held in the UK. The RQF differs from the RAE in its reliance on local institutional repositories for the provision of access to research outputs, and this paper will explain how it is envisaged that this role will be filled, and the challenges that arise from this role.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/groenewegen-treloar" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 feature article andrew treloar david groenewegen dest ims monash university national library of australia wikipedia access control accessibility authentication copyright data digital repositories dissemination dspace eprints fedora commons framework identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata national library persistent identifier preservation rae repositories research software standards xacml xml Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1326 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ARROW, DART and ARCHER: A Quiver Full of Research Repository and Related Projects http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/treloar-groenewegen <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/treloar-groenewegen#author2">Andrew Treloar</a> and <a href="/issue51/treloar-groenewegen#author1">David Groenewegen</a> describe three inter-related projects to support scholarly outputs and the e-research life cycle which have been funded by the Australian Commonwealth Government.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/treloar-groenewegen" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 feature article andrew treloar david groenewegen dest monash university national library of australia oai university of queensland accessibility archives cache cataloguing content management curation data data management data set digital library digital repositories dissemination dspace e-research eprints fedora commons framework identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability metadata national library oai-pmh ontologies open access open archives initiative open source persistent identifier portal privacy repositories research schema search technology shibboleth software sru srw standards url web services Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1307 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Rustle of Digital Curation: The JISC Annual Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt#author1">Julie Allinson</a>, <a href="/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt#author2">Marieke Guy</a> and <a href="/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt#author3">Maureen Pennock</a> find themselves contemplating e-frameworks, digital curation and repositories at the JISC Annual Conference.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On 14 March 2006 we found ourselves back at the Birmingham International Convention Centre (ICC) for the 2006 JISC Conference. The annual conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] is both an opportunity for JISC to platform the variety of activities it funds and for delegates to learn about the full range of JISC's work by participating in seminars, debates, workshops and demonstrations. This report tries to capture the air of the event through a series of session snapshots.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 event report julie allinson marieke guy maureen pennock british library cclrc coalition for networked information dcc dest digital preservation coalition edina google hefce intute jisc jisc collections london school of economics mimas ogc open geospatial consortium sherpa ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of southampton wellcome trust cd-lor claddier e-framework jisc information environment jorum romeo api archives blog cataloguing copyright curation data data set database digital curation digital preservation digital repositories digitisation e-learning e-research eportfolio eprints flash framework geospatial data gis google maps higher education ict infrastructure institutional repository interoperability learning design learning objects metadata open access open source preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology text mining vocabularies wireless wms xml Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1235 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The (Digital) Library Environment: Ten Years After http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/dempsey <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue46/dempsey#author1">Lorcan Dempsey</a> considers how the digital library environment has changed in the ten years since Ariadne was first published.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We have recently come through several decennial celebrations: the W3C, the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative, <em>D-Lib Magazine</em>, and now <em>Ariadne</em>. What happened clearly in the mid-nineties was the convergence of the Web with more pervasive network connectivity, and this made our sense of the network as a shared space for research and learning, work and play, a more real and apparently achievable goal.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/dempsey" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue46 feature article lorcan dempsey amazon bldsc british library california digital library d-lib magazine dest google harvard university iso jisc microsoft national library of australia oai oclc research information network sakai university of virginia w3c archives hub bath information and data services dner e-framework ebank uk elib irra jisc information environment worldcat aggregation api archives authentication authentication service bibliographic data blog born digital browser cache cataloguing content management copac copyright crm curation data data set database digital asset management digital curation digital identity digital library digital preservation digitisation dspace dublin core dublin core metadata initiative e-learning e-research eportfolio firefox flickr framework google scholar higher education html infrastructure instant messaging institutional repository itunes learning management system library management systems metadata national library netvibes network service oai-pmh ontologies open access open source openurl personalisation portal portfolio preservation programmable web rae repositories research resource description resource discovery resource management resource sharing rss schema search technology service registry software sru standardisation tagging taxonomy uportal url visualisation vle vocabularies web 2.0 web resources web services wiki wireless z39.50 Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1207 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Planet-SOSIG http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/planet-sosig <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue41/planet-sosig#author1">Angela Joyce</a> shares her personal impressions from the recent European Digital Libraries Conference in Bath; Emma Place introduces a new seminar series to support online information seeking in the social sciences.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="A_Digital_Day_in_Bath">A Digital Day in Bath</h2> <p>On a stormy wet Tuesday, I battled my way through the Bath University campus to attend the 2004 European Conference on Digital Libraries. The keynote address by <strong>Neil McLean</strong> from IMS Australia was called <em>The Ecology of Repository Services: A Cosmic View</em> and it lived up to its name, being a wide-ranging look at the explosion of interest in digital resources and e-learning. People are just starting to think about the lifecycle of online resources and how to manage them.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/planet-sosig" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue41 regular column angela joyce dest ilrt ims jisc mpeg university of bath university of bristol university of oxford sosig data database digital library dissemination e-learning higher education metadata multimedia personalisation repositories research resource discovery search technology software usability Fri, 29 Oct 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1085 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk