Overview of content related to 'bbc' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/1227/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en LinkedUp: Linking Open Data for Education http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author1">Marieke Guy</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author2">Mathieu d’Aquin</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author3">Stefan Dietze</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author4">Hendrik Drachsler</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author5">Eelco Herder</a> and <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author6">Elisabetta Parodi</a> describe the activities carried out by the LinkedUp Project looking at the promotion of open data in education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the past, discussions around Open Education have tended to focus on content and primarily Open Educational Resources (OER), freely accessible, openly licensed resources that are used for teaching, learning, assessment and research purposes. However Open Education is a complex beast made up of many aspects, of which the opening up of data is one important element.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article eelco herder elisabetta parodi hendrik drachsler marieke guy mathieu d’aquin stefan dietze bbc dcc elsevier knowledge media institute mimas open knowledge foundation open university ordnance survey ukoln university of bath university of manchester university of southampton w3c dbpedia europeana linkedup project wikipedia blog cataloguing cloud computing data data management data mining data set data visualisation dissemination facebook framework higher education hypertext ict identifier information retrieval infrastructure interoperability learning analytics learning management system linked data lod mashup metadata mobile mobile learning mooc oer open data open education personalisation portal privacy rdf remote working repositories research search technology semantic web sparql topic map twitter uri usability video visualisation web resources web standards xml Tue, 04 Feb 2014 13:12:30 +0000 editor 2503 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Potential of Learning Analytics and Big Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/charlton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/charlton-et-al#author1">Patricia Charlton</a>, <a href="/issue71/charlton-et-al#author2">Manolis Mavrikis</a> and <a href="/issue71/charlton-et-al#author3">Demetra Katsifli</a> discuss how the emerging trend of learning analytics and big data can support and empower learning and teaching.</p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p style="margin-left:18.0pt;">&nbsp;‘<em>Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted</em>.’ Attributed to Albert Einstein</p> </blockquote><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/charlton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article demetra katsifli manolis mavrikis patricia charlton bbc google ieee jenzabar london knowledge lab algorithm big data browser cybernetics data data mining database doi e-learning educational data mining framework hadoop higher education identifier learning analytics learning design modelling mooc personalisation research search technology semantic web social networks software streaming video visualisation Mon, 08 Jul 2013 20:07:14 +0000 lisrw 2476 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Engaging Researchers with Social Media Tools: 25 Research Things@Huddersfield http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author1">Graham Stone</a> and <a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author2">Ellen Collins</a> investigate whether 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme, could help researchers understand the value of Web 2.0 tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article explores whether an online learning course can help academic researchers to become more familiar with social media tools, and seeks to understand how they can put them to use within their research and teaching activities. It does so by considering the development, implementation and evaluation of a pilot Web 2.0 course, 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme developed at the University of Huddersfield, which gives researchers a structured way to engage with selected Web 2.0 tools.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article ellen collins graham stone bbc blackboard british library cilip google jisc jisc collections research information network university of huddersfield citeulike myexperiment wikipedia aggregation archives blog creative commons data diigo dissemination e-learning facebook flickr framework further education google docs higher education identifier interoperability learning design learning objects librarything mashup metadata mobile phone open access podcast repositories research rss social networks software streaming tagging technorati twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress Thu, 27 Jun 2013 20:52:47 +0000 lisrw 2457 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ECLAP 2013: Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eclap-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the second international conference held by ECLAP, the e-library for performing arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The beautiful city of Porto was the host location for ECLAP 2013 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the 2nd International Conference on Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment. &nbsp;Porto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon and home of the Instituto Politécnico do Porto (IPP), the largest polytechnic in the country, with over 18,500 students.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report marieke guy bbc coventry university dcc microsoft oais ukoln university of leeds university of lisbon w3c europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data blog copyright creative commons data data management digital archive digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dublin core dvd ebook epub foaf framework geospatial data haptics higher education ict internet explorer interoperability knowledge base lod metadata multimedia ontologies open data owl preservation rdf remote working repositories research schema social networks software standards streaming usability video vocabularies Thu, 04 Jul 2013 20:46:57 +0000 lisrw 2471 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Crisis Information Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tonkin-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tonkin-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> offers a review of a thought-provoking overview of crisis informatics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In her introduction to this collection, Hagar [<a href="#1">1</a>] – who coined the term ‘crisis informatics’ [<a href="#2">2</a>] - begins by providing the following definition of the term ‘crisis’ (taken from Johnston, <em>The Dictionary of Human Geography</em>,&nbsp; 2002 [<a href="#3">3</a>]) - ‘an interruption in the reproduction of economic, cultural, social and/or political life’. This book discusses crises as diverse as wartime disruption, earthquakes, fires, hurricanes, viruses and terrorist activity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tonkin-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review emma tonkin american library association bbc jisc library of congress ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of oxford jisc information environment data management data visualisation dissemination dublin core framework infrastructure metadata preservation repositories research search technology tagging twitter usability Sat, 06 Jul 2013 21:26:52 +0000 lisrw 2474 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 'Does He Take Sugar?': The Risks of Standardising Easy-to-read Language http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/kelly-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author1">Brian Kelly</a>, <a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author2">Dominik Lukeš</a> and <a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author3">Alistair McNaught</a> highlight the risks of attempting to standardise easy-to-read language for online resources.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The idea that if we could only improve how we communicate, there would be less misunderstanding among people is as old as the hills. Historically, this notion has been expressed through things like school reform, spelling reform, publication of communication manuals, etc. The most radical expression of the desire for better understanding is the invention of a whole new artificial language with the intention of providing a universal language for humanity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/kelly-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article alistair mcnaught brian kelly dominik lukes alt alt-c bbc google jisc jisc techdis rdwg ukoln university of bath w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility algorithm blog bs8878 dissemination doi e-learning framework higher education internet explorer multimedia operating system research search technology software standards vocabularies wcag web 2.0 web resources Sat, 15 Dec 2012 15:18:25 +0000 lisrw 2431 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 21st-century Scholarship and Wikipedia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/thomas#author1">Amber Thomas</a> explores the ways in which emerging research practices and Wikipedia illustrate the changing boundaries of academic work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia, the world’s fifth most-used Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>], is a good illustration of the growing credibility of online resources. In his article in <em>Ariadne </em>earlier this year, “Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Academic Acceptance” [<a href="#2">2</a>], Brian Whalley described the debates around accuracy and review, in the context of geology.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article amber thomas bbc becta british library jisc open university orcid ukoln university of warwick jorum myexperiment wikipedia archives blog data dewey decimal e-learning framework further education google scholar higher education identifier infrastructure linked data oer open access open education open source rdf repositories research search technology semantic web smartphone software uri web 2.0 wiki Fri, 30 Nov 2012 13:18:23 +0000 lisrw 2390 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hydra UK: Flexible Repository Solutions to Meet Varied Needs http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the Hydra UK event held on 22 November 2012 at the Library of the London School of Economics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Hydra, as described in the opening presentation of this event, is a project initiated in 2008 by the University of Hull, Stanford University, University of Virginia, and DuraSpace to work towards a reusable framework for multi-purpose, multi-functional, multi-institutional repository-enabled solutions for the management of digital content collections [<a href="#1">1</a>]. An initial timeframe for the project of three years had seen all founding institutional partners successfully implement a repository demonstrating these characteristics.&nbsp; Key to the aims of the project has always been to generate wider interest outside the partners to foster not only sustainability in the technology, but also sustainability of the community around this open source development.&nbsp; Hydra has been disseminated through a range of events, particularly through the international Open Repositories conferences [<a href="#2">2</a>], but the sphere of interest in Hydra has now stimulated the holding of specific events in different countries: Hydra UK is one of them.</p> <p>The Hydra UK event was held on 22 November 2012, kindly hosted by the Library at the London School of Economics.&nbsp; Representatives from institutions across the UK, but also Ireland, Austria and Switzerland, came together to learn about the Hydra Project, and to discuss how Hydra might serve their digital content collection management needs.&nbsp; 29 delegates from 21 institutions were present, representing mostly universities but also the archive, museum and commercial sectors.&nbsp; Five presentations were given on Hydra, focusing on the practical experience of using this framework and how it fits into overall system architectures, and time was also deliberately given over to discussion of more specific topics of interest and to allow delegates the opportunity to voice their requirements.&nbsp; The presentations were:</p> <ul> <li>Introduction to Hydra</li> <li>Hydra @ Hull</li> <li>Hydra @ Glasgow Caledonian University</li> <li>Hydra @ LSE</li> <li>Hydra @ Oxford</li> </ul> <h2 id="Introduction_to_Hydra">Introduction to Hydra</h2> <p>Chris Awre from the University of Hull gave the opening presentation.&nbsp; The starting basis for Hydra was mutual recognition by all the founding partners that a repository should be an enabler for managing digital content collections, not a constraint or simply a silo of content.&nbsp; Digital repositories have been put forward and applied as a potential solution for a variety of use cases over the years, and been used at different stages of a content lifecycle.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="LSE Library (Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure1-hydra-rpt-lse-library.jpg" style="width: 178px; height: 178px;" title="LSE Library (Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: LSE Library</strong><br /><small>(Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)</small></p> <p>To avoid producing a landscape of multiple repositories all having to be managed to cover these use cases, the Hydra Project sought to identify a way in which one repository solution could be applied flexibly to meet the requirements of different use cases. The idea of a single repository with multiple points of interaction came into being – Hydra – and the concept of individual Hydra ‘head’ solutions.</p> <p>The Hydra Project is informed by two main principles:</p> <ul> <li>No single system can provide the full range of repository-based solutions for a given institution’s needs,<br />o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; …yet sustainable solutions require a common repository infrastructure.</li> <li>No single institution can resource the development of a full range of solutions on its own,<br />o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; …yet each needs the flexibility to tailor solutions to local demands and workflows.</li> </ul> <p>The Hydra Project has sought to provide the common infrastructure upon which flexible solutions can be built, and shared.</p> <p>The recognition that no single institution can achieve everything it might want for its repository has influenced the project from the start. &nbsp;To quote an African proverb, ‘If you want to go fast go alone, if you want to go far, go together’. Working together has been vital.&nbsp; To organise this interaction, Hydra has structured itself through three interleaving sub-communities, the Steering Group, the Partners and Developers, as shown by Figure 2.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/hydra-community-structure-v4.jpg" style="width: 661px; height: 506px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> <!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure2-hydra-community-structure.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 490px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> --><!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure2-hydra-community-structure.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 490px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> --><p>The concept of a Hydra Partner has emerged from this model of actively working together, and the project has a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) process for any institution wishing to have its use of, and contribution and commitment to Hydra recognised.&nbsp; Starting with the original four partners in 2008, Hydra now has 11 partners, with two more in the process of joining.&nbsp; All have made valuable contributions and helped to make Hydra better.&nbsp; Hydra partnership is not the only route to involvement, though, and there are many in the Hydra developer community who are adopters of the software, but who have not reached a stage where partnership is appropriate.</p> <p>The technical implementation of Hydra was supported through early involvement in the project by MediaShelf, a commercial technical consultancy focused on repository solutions.&nbsp; All Hydra software is, though, open source, available under the Apache 2.0 licence, and all software code contributions are managed in this way.&nbsp; The technical implementation is based on a set of core principles that describe how content objects should be structured within the repository, and with an understanding that different content types can be managed using different workflows.&nbsp; Following these principles, Hydra could be implemented in a variety of ways: the technical direction taken by the project is simply the one that suited the partners at the time.</p> <p>Hydra as currently implemented is built on existing open source components, and the project partners are committed to supporting these over time:</p> <ul> <li>Fedora: one of the digital repository systems maintained through DuraSpace [<a href="#3">3</a>]</li> <li>Apache Solr: powerful indexing software now being used in a variety of discovery solutions [<a href="#4">4</a>]</li> <li>Blacklight: a next-generation discovery interface, which has its own community around it [<a href="#5">5</a>]</li> <li>Hydra plugin: a collection of components that facilitate workflow in managing digital content [<a href="#6">6</a>]</li> <li>Solrizer: a component that indexes Fedora-held content into a Solr index</li> </ul> <p>These components are arranged in the architecture shown in Figure 3.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 3: Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure3-hydra-architecture-v4.jpg" style="width: 543px; height: 258px;" title="Figure 3: Hydra architecture" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 3: Hydra architecture</strong></p> <!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/architecture.png" style="width: 547px; height: 262px;" title="Hydra architecture"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Hydra architecture</strong></p> --><!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/architecture.png" style="width: 547px; height: 262px;" title="Hydra architecture"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Hydra architecture</strong></p> --><p>A common feature of the last three components in the list above is the use of Ruby on Rails as the coding language and its ability to package up functionality in discrete ‘gems’.&nbsp; This was consciously chosen for Hydra because of its agile programming capabilities, its use of the MVC (Model–View–Controller) structure, and its testing infrastructure.&nbsp; The choice has been validated on a number of occasions as Hydra has developed.&nbsp; However, it was noted that other coding languages and systems could be used to implement Hydra where appropriate.&nbsp; This applies to all the main components, even Fedora.&nbsp; Whilst a powerful and flexible repository solution in its own right, Fedora has proved to be complex to use: Hydra has sought in part to tap this capability through simpler interfaces and interactions.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report chris awre bbc bodleian libraries california digital library duraspace glasgow caledonian university jisc london school of economics sakai stanford university university of hull university of oxford university of virginia hydra jisc information environment remap project apache api archives authentication cataloguing collection development content management data data management data set digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination eprints fedora commons framework google maps infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata multimedia open source preservation repositories research ruby search technology sharepoint software solr streaming video vle Thu, 13 Dec 2012 19:24:07 +0000 lisrw 2411 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: User Studies for Digital Library Development http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/aytac-rvw#author1">Selenay Aytac</a> reviews a collection of essays on user studies and digital library development that provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>User Studies for Digital Library Development</em> provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries. While there are many books on user studies and digital library development, this work operates at the junction of these two domains and stands out for its insights, balance, and quality of its case-based investigations. The book brings together points of view from different professional communities, including practitioners as well as researchers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review selenay aytac bbc glasgow caledonian university library of congress long island university manchester metropolitan university national library of australia university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of malta university of oxford university of sheffield university of strathclyde europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data course design creative commons data digital library digital preservation e-learning framework information society metadata mobile multimedia national library open access research resource discovery usability web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:10:17 +0000 lisrw 2412 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The E-copyright Handbook http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/oppenheim-rvw#author1">Charles Oppenheim</a> takes a look at the latest of Paul Pedley’s copyright guidance books, and, in some respects, finds it wanting.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Paul Pedley is a name that needs no introduction to <em>aficionados</em> of copyright textbooks, being the author of several such books published by Facet Publishing in the past (and reviewed by <em>Ariadne </em>[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>][<a href="#3">3</a>][<a href="#4">4</a>][<a href="#5">5</a>]).&nbsp; His latest effort, <em>The E-copyright Handbook</em>, attempts to cover the fast-moving and complex world of electronic copyright, using an interesting approach.&nbsp; Rather than the traditional way of such books, describing the media and describing the rights granted to copyright owners, the way the law applies to each media type, exceptions to copyright and so on, his approach is a mixture but with some emphasis on activities, as a glance at the chapter titles shows: Introduction, Content Types, Activities, Copyright Exceptions, Licences, the Digital Economy Act, Enforcement and The Hargreaves Review.&nbsp;</p> <p>It is a complex approach, which requires careful cross-referencing and also checking that material is neither duplicated, nor that is anything is overlooked.&nbsp; It is not clear to me whether the book is meant for reading through, or whether it should be just dipped into when a particular issue causes someone to check the law; but I found the approach confusing.&nbsp;</p> <p>The book also suffers from being in a fast-moving area, where the law, and technology, change fast and although it is clear that Facet got the book published in record time, as there are numerous references to 2012 developments in the text, the work is already out of date in several places, and will no doubt get more out of date as the months go on.&nbsp; Another problem is that the book cannot make up its mind whether it is written for UK readers, or readers in the EU, or in the USA.&nbsp; All too often, different countries’ court cases are mentioned together; one is (say) a UK case and another is a US case.&nbsp; Without the understanding that US law and UK law in this field are very different, people will come to incorrect conclusions about the significance of the cases to them in their day to day work. Moreover, all too often the cases are described without any court decisions relating to them being provided; so one is left with the worry ‘why did the author mention this case at all?’</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review charles oppenheim bbc de montfort university google jisc loughborough university university of strathclyde bibliographic data bibliometrics cloud computing copyright data database dissemination google books open access research standards streaming url web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:30:54 +0000 lisrw 2415 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 69 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 69.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Never blessed with any sporting acumen, I have to confess to a degree of ambivalence towards the London Olympics unfolding around this issue as it publishes. That does not mean that I do not wish all the participants well in what after all is an enormous achievement just to be able to compete there at all. While I admit to not watching every team walk and wave, I cannot deny that the beginning and end of the Opening Ceremony [<a href="#1">1</a>] did grab my attention. Who could blame me? I suspect we sat as a nation terrified to discover what this would say about us all.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 editorial richard waller bbc blackboard jisc jisc collections loughborough university ukoln university of bath university of glamorgan university of pretoria devcsi wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives authentication blog cache collection development content management data database digital preservation drupal ebook framework internet explorer json knowledge management licence metadata ocr opac open source perl refworks repositories research schema search technology shibboleth standards usability visualisation wiki xml Tue, 31 Jul 2012 11:45:13 +0000 lisrw 2372 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Acceptance in Academic Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the light of a workshop run by the Geological Society of London and Wikimedia UK, <a href="/issue69/whalley#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reflects on the attitudes and practice of academia in respect of present-day Wikipedia content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia has become internationally known as an online encyclopaedia ('The Free Encyclopedia'). Developed by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger and launched in 2001 it has, to date, editions in 285 languages. Wikipedia is but one subset of the Web-based applications known as 'wikis'. The original wiki (as wikiwikiweb) was developed by Ward Cunningham in the 1990s as the least complex way of rapidly sharing and communicating 'information'. Wiki is Hawaiian for 'quick'; repeating the word is equivalent to adding 'very'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article brian whalley amazon bbc hea jisc massachusetts institute of technology oxford university press university of exeter university of oxford university of sheffield wikipedia algorithm augmented reality creative commons data database ebook further education higher education ipad iphone metadata mobile oer open access portal research search technology semantic web software web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 20:26:22 +0000 lisrw 2357 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Managing Research Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rumsey-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/rumsey-rvw#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> reviews a book which describes and explains the topics of interest central to practitioners involved with research data management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Higher Education institutions (HEIs) in the UK are planning and implementing infrastructure and services to manage research data more urgently than they did for research publications. One policy framework sent to UK vice-chancellors from a major UK funding body (EPSRC), which set out clear expectations of responsibilities for data management at institutions within a given timetable, appears to have been the spark that prompted research data management (RDM) to be taken up by the upper echelons of management, and concrete activities set in place to start addressing the problem.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rumsey-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review sally rumsey bbc bodleian libraries datacite dcc jisc oais university of oxford archives blog curation data data citation data management data set doi foi framework higher education identifier infrastructure repositories research social networks wiki Sun, 29 Jul 2012 13:51:34 +0000 lisrw 2361 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Has Second Life Lived up to Expectations? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gorman <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/gorman#author1">Paul Gorman</a> examines to what degree Second Life has justified the claims made for it by its evangelists with particular regard to education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Second Life (SL) is a virtual world created and owned by a company called Linden Lab and was launched in 2003. By 2006, SL was increasingly visible in the UK media and by 2007 SL had secured over 600 mentions in UK newspapers and magazines [<a href="#1">1</a>]. However, media interest in SL evaporated rapidly with references to it dropping by more than 40% in 2008 and even further since. During this peak period SL attracted large investment in virtual land from multi-national corporations, businesses and also attracted significant interest from educational institutions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gorman" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article paul gorman bbc city of glasgow college glasgow caledonian university harvard university jisc linden lab university of edinburgh avatar blog e-learning facebook graphics instant messaging research second life twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2224 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The CLIF Project: The Repository as Part of a Content Lifecycle http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/green-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/green-et-al#author1">Richard Green</a>, <a href="/issue68/green-et-al#author2">Chris Awre</a> and <a href="/issue68/green-et-al#author3">Simon Waddington</a> describe how a digital repository can become part of the technical landscape within an institution and support digital content lifecycle management across systems.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>At the heart of meeting institutional requirements for managing digital content is the need to understand the different operations through which content goes, from planning and creation through to disposal or preservation.&nbsp; Digital content is created using a variety of authoring tools.&nbsp; Once created, the content is often stored somewhere different, made accessible in possibly more than one way, altered as required, and then moved for deletion or preservation at an appropriate point.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/green-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article chris awre richard green simon waddington bbc jisc kings college london microsoft sakai stanford university university of hull university of virginia clif hydra jisc information environment remap project repomman archives cataloguing collection development content management content management interoperability services data data management digital repositories dublin core e-research fedora commons framework higher education institutional repository metadata mods opac open source preservation repositories research search technology sharepoint software solr standards url Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2225 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Future of the Past of the Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/fpw11-rpt#author1">Matthew Brack</a> reports on the one-day international workshop 'The Future of the Past of the Web' held at the British Library Conference Centre, London on 7 October, 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We have all heard at least some of the extraordinary statistics that attempt to capture the sheer size and ephemeral nature of the Web. According to the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), more than 70 new domains are registered and more than 500,000 documents are added to the Web every minute [<a href="#1">1</a>]. This scale, coupled with its ever-evolving use, present significant challenges to those concerned with preserving both the content and context of the Web.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report matthew brack bbc british library bsi dcc digital preservation coalition google hanzo archives institute of historical research iso jisc kings college london library of congress nhs oxford internet institute the national archives university of oxford university of sheffield wellcome library arcomem internet archive memento uk government web archive aggregation algorithm api archives big data blog browser cache curation data data mining data model digital asset management digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi flickr identifier interoperability library data lod metadata preservation repositories research search technology social web software tag cloud twitter ulcc uri url visualisation warc wayback machine web resources wordpress youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 12:06:52 +0000 lisrw 2236 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) Project Launch Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/lis-rc-dream-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/lis-rc-dream-rpt#author1">Ray Harper</a> reports on a one-day conference which launched the DREaM Project, held by the Library and Information Science Research Coalition in London on 19 July 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The DREaM (Developing Research Excellence and Methods) Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held at the British Library Conference Centre in London in July 2011. The conference was attended by 86 delegates, and consisted of an overview of the DREaM Project, two keynote papers, a one-minute madness session, and four parallel breakout sessions. I had the opportunity to attend as a sponsored delegate, thanks to Glen Recruitment, Sue Hill Recruitment and TFPL.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/lis-rc-dream-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report ray harper american library association bbc british library cilip edinburgh napier university imperial college london indiana university information today loughborough university nhs northumbria university university college cork university of cambridge university of oxford university of sheffield lis research coalition blog cookie data dissemination framework information society knowledge management metadata open access repositories research search technology social networks taxonomy Mon, 27 Feb 2012 16:59:05 +0000 lisrw 2237 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: From Lending to Learning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/davies-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/davies-rvw#author1">Tim Davies</a> reviews a spirited defence of public libraries, which tries to define their core purpose and which argues for a re-positioning of their place in society.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For those of us who work in public libraries these are, in the words of the old Chinese proverb, 'interesting times'. The service is under scrutiny at both local and national levels, with an intensity unknown in previous generations. Public libraries are in the news, with headline stories on the BBC's <em>Today</em> and <em>Newsnight</em>. They are the focus of demonstrations and read-ins, as councils struggle to balance severely reduced budgets.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/davies-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review tim davies bbc north lincolnshire library jisc information environment wikipedia dvd ebook information retrieval information society plain text research standards Sat, 18 Feb 2012 23:25:28 +0000 lisrw 2228 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk From Link Rot to Web Sanctuary: Creating the Digital Educational Resource Archive (DERA) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/scaife <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/scaife#author1">Bernard M Scaife</a> describes how an innovative use of the EPrints repository software is helping to preserve official documents from the Web.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>When I started as Technical Services Librarian at the Institute of Education (IOE) in September 2009, one of the first tasks I was given was to do something about all the broken links in the catalogue. Link rot [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the bane of the Systems Librarian's life and I was well aware that you had to run fast to stand still.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/scaife" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article bernard m scaife bbc becta google jisc national library of australia oai the national archives uk data archive university of london university of southampton archives bibliographic data cataloguing collection development content management copyright creative commons data data mining digital preservation digitisation dspace eprints fedora commons higher education html identifier infrastructure interoperability lcsh library management systems licence metadata ms word multimedia national library oai-pmh open access preservation provenance repositories research schema search technology software thesaurus ulcc url xml Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1625 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Why UK Further and Higher Education Needs Local Software Developers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/mahey-walk <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/mahey-walk#author1">Mahendra Mahey</a> and <a href="/issue65/mahey-walk#author2">Paul Walk</a> discuss the work of the Developer Community Supporting Innovation (DevCSI) Project which focuses on building capacity for software developers in UK Further and Higher Education to support innovation in the sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Software developers are important to Further (FE) and Higher Education (HE). They are needed to develop and implement local FEI (Further Education Institution) and HEI (Higher Education Institution) solutions, to build e-infrastructure, and to innovate and develop ideas and prototypes that can be exploited by others. They also play an important part in the development and uptake of open standards and interoperability.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/mahey-walk" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article mahendra mahey paul walk bbc google harvard university jisc oracle ukoln university of bath university of london devcsi list8d accessibility blog data digital repositories disruptive innovation eprints further education google docs higher education infrastructure interoperability metadata python rdf rdfa repositories research software ulcc video Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1587 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Survive or Thrive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt#author1">Ed Fay</a> reports on a two-day conference organised by UKOLN on behalf of JISC to consider growth and use of digital content on the Web, which was held in Manchester in June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Survive or Thrive [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the punchy title given to an event intended to stimulate serious consideration amongst digital collections practitioners about future directions in our field - opportunities but also potential pitfalls. The event, which focused on content in HE, comes at a time of financial uncertainty when proving value is of increasing importance in the sector and at a point when significant investment has already been made in the UK into content creation, set against a backdrop of increasingly available content on the open Web from a multitude of sources.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report ed fay apple bbc california digital library cerlim edina eduserv google jisc jisc digital media london school of economics massachusetts institute of technology ordnance survey rdtf talis the national archives university of huddersfield accessibility aggregation agile development api archives blog cataloguing data digital curation digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dissemination domain model e-learning flickr geospatial data gis html identifier information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository interoperability itunes javascript linked data mashup metadata mobile personalisation preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology social networks software solr standards tagging text mining twitter usability widget Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1593 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Europeana Open Culture 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author1">David Fuegi</a> and <a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author2">Monika Segbert-Elbert</a> report on the annual Europeana Conference, held at the Westergasfabriek in Amsterdam in October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Europeana Conference is a free annual event which highlights current challenges for libraries, museums, archives and audio-visual archives and which looks for practical solutions for the future. It connects the main actors in cultural and scientific heritage in order to build networks and establish future collaborations. The Europeana Open Culture 2010 Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was the third annual conference and the biggest so far. It focused on how the cultural institutions can create public value by making digital, cultural and scientific information openly available.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report david fuegi monika elbert bbc british museum google europeana wikipedia aggregation archives authentication blog copyright creative commons data database digital library digitisation dissemination flickr framework geospatial data gis google books information society intellectual property linked data metadata open access open data open source portal provenance semantic web standards video web 2.0 Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1594 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 64: Supporting the Power of Research Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 64.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In these cash-strapped times among all the admonitions to save money here, and resources there, I rather hope to hear much about the necessity of protecting and building the knowledge economy if the UK is to make its way in the globalised world, since we cannot pretend to compete easily in other areas of endeavour. Hence research has to be regarded as one of the aces remaining to us, and thus I hope the importance of gathering, managing and preserving for long-term access research outcomes will be widely appreciated and supported.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 editorial richard waller bbc cerlim google ifla intute national library of australia rnib automatic metadata generation itunes u archives bibliographic data bibliographic record big data blog cataloguing curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories digitisation drupal dspace e-science electronic theses fedora commons framework frbr google scholar higher education infrastructure interoperability ipad iphone itunes metadata mobile national library preservation repositories research search technology social networks software standards twitter vim web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1559 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Public Library 2.0: Culture Change? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/hammond <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/hammond#author1">Sarah Hammond</a> explores UK public libraries' growing participation in social media to reach their audiences online, with a focus on blogging.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Beginning in the mid 2000s I began keeping an eye on how libraries have been getting involved with social software - I started this haphazardly just out of interest but then I started to be more systematic when I needed to explore online resources for my organisation, the National Railway Museum. When I left to pursue my MA in Librarianship at the University of Sheffield I took the opportunity to do some serious research into the subject with a focus on UK public libraries as it seemed to me that they were hugely under-represented online.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/hammond" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article sarah hammond bbc british library information today nhs oxford university press robert gordon university university of oxford university of sheffield university of the west of england archives blog doi facebook flickr framework higher education librarything microblogging mobile netvibes opac podcast research search technology social software software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1562 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intute Reflections at the End of an Era http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author1">Angela Joyce</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author2">Linda Kerr</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author3">Tim Machin</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author4">Paul Meehan</a> and <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author5">Caroline Williams</a> look back at the history and achievements of Intute, and reflect on lessons learned as the service enters its final year.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article angela joyce caroline williams linda kerr paul meehan tim machin ahrc bbc british library google hea heriot-watt university intute jisc linden lab mimas ukoln university of bristol university of glamorgan university of huddersfield university of manchester university of oxford wellcome trust automatic metadata generation eevl elib jisc information environment mobile internet detective sosig wikipedia blog cataloguing collection development curation data database digitisation dissemination google scholar higher education metadata mobile personalisation research resource discovery search technology second life software tagging twitter vim vocabularies web 2.0 web browser web resources widget Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1564 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23 Things in Public Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/leech#author1">Helen Leech</a> describes a collaborative project to increase front-line staff's understanding and use of Web 2.0 in public libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Did you know that:</p> <ul> <li>Of the Generation Y – the generation born in the 1980s and 1990s – 96% are members of a social network</li> <li>There are some 200 million blogs on the World Wide Web</li> <li>One in eight couples who married in the USA in 2009 met over the Internet</li> <li>If Facebook were a country, it would be the fourth largest by population in the world after China, the USA and India</li> </ul> <p>All the statistics emanate from Socialnomics [<a href="#1">1</a>]. They are designed to be attention-grabbers, and they will no doubt provoke ferocious debate. However, what is unarguable is that some seismic shifts have taken place on the Internet in the past ten years, and social media and user-generated content now play a huge role in the way many people create and share information and how they communicate with each other.</p> <p>These changes have crept up on public libraries. Ten years ago, we became Internet experts when the People's Network initiative put 30,000 computers into our buildings. We became used to the new role of teaching people how to use a mouse, what a search engine is, how to create an email account. But when it came to content, we tended to leave that to our customers. Friends Reunited came along, followed by Myspace, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, and we were dimly aware of them as social phenomena, but we did not have much to do with them in our day-to-day work.</p> <h2 id="Changes_in_Public_Libraries">Changes in Public Libraries</h2> <p>So what has changed and why do we need to know about them now? The list below is by no means exhaustive but represents some of the main drivers behind changes emerging within public libraries in the UK.</p> <ol> <li>The need to help people get online. As I write, every public library in the UK is being asked to sign up to Race Online [<a href="#2">2</a>], the initiative to get 100% of the population clued up by the time the Olympics happens. The reappointed UK Digital Champion Martha Lane Fox launched the Race Online 2012 campaign in March 2010. The initiative reports that more than 600 partners have pledged to help more than 1.7 million new people to get online by the end of 2012. Its rationale is "to build a UK of near-universal web literacy by the time of the Olympics, with access as easy and affordable as water, electricity or gas and skills considered as fundamental as literacy and numeracy: [its] ambition is to get everyone of working-age online by the end of this Parliament." People need to know the key skills for getting around online, and a large part of these skills involves social networking.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>Changes in the way people communicate. There is a subtle shift taking place in electronic communication, moving onwards from email towards more collaborative methods: file sharing and cloud computing, social media that include information 'walls,' instant messaging and mobile apps. There is growing evidence that Generation Y and the Millenials – the generations born after the late 1980s – are moving towards very different methods of communication. It is important that library staff understand these technologies, since they are going to become as mainstream as email very shortly.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><em>Communities in Control</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>]: you might recognise this as the title of a recent government paper, looking at the need to pass control over political processes to local communities, and how this could be achieved. The principle is being reinforced through the new administration's Big Society initiative [<a href="#4">4</a>]. New technologies are allowing people to mobilise in a way that simply has not been possible before, to create and share content, and to become involved in the running of public libraries in radical new ways. It is also worth looking at the International Association for Public Participation's <em>Spectrum of Public Participation </em>[<a href="#5">5</a>] which gives some idea of the range of ways in which we need to work with our communities, from providing them with information all the way up to acting as facilitators so that they can manage and run services themselves. It is also worth watching the film <em>Us Now</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], which gives a glimpse of the way that new technologies might affect people's relationships with central government and public services. It highlights the way that social networking applications allow huge numbers of people to collaborate to do previously unthinkable things, like run a bank. If communities can make the day-to-day decisions necessary to run a bank or a second division football club, then it starts to become possible that they could do the same for political processes or delivery of public services. Library staff need to understand this culture of engagement, and to understand the tools that facilitate it.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>The economic environment. The next four years, 2010-14, are going to be the hardest public services have seen, and we are going to have to make cost savings everywhere we can. There are clear benefits in collaboration, and the tools that are available for this are improving rapidly. Which is where <em>23 Things</em> comes in.<br /> </li></ol><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article helen leech bbc google imperial college london university of huddersfield wikipedia archives blog cataloguing cloud computing database facebook file sharing flickr google wave instant messaging librarything mobile podcast rss search technology social networks software tagging twitter url video web 2.0 wiki youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1565 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Blue Ribbon Task Force Symposium on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/blue-ribbon-uk-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/blue-ribbon-uk-2010-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on a symposium which provided an opportunity for stakeholders to respond to the recent Blue Ribbon Task Force report on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On Thursday 6 May 2010 an historic event took place. The event allowed people to express their opinions on potential future action in a highly significant area. No, not the British general election, and I'm sure the concurrence of dates was unintentional! This event was the Blue Ribbon Task Force Symposium on sustainable digital preservation and access, held at the Wellcome Collection Conference Centre in London [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/blue-ribbon-uk-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report marieke guy bbc british library cni coalition for networked information datacite dcc iso jisc oclc open planets foundation uk data archive ukoln university college london university of bath university of essex beginners guide to digital preservation europeana archives blog copyright creative commons curation data data set digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dublin core fedora commons framework infrastructure national library open access open source preservation research software video Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1570 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Fourth DCC-RIN Research Data Management Forum http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/rdmf4-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/rdmf4-rpt#author1">Martin Donnelly</a> and <a href="/issue63/rdmf4-rpt#author2">Graham Pryor</a> report on the fourth Research Data Management Forum event, on the theme "Dealing with Sensitive Data: Managing Ethics, Security and Trust," organised by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) and Research Information Network (RIN) in Manchester, England, over 10 - 11 March, 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The fourth meeting of the Research Data Management Forum was held in Manchester on 10 and 11 March 2010, co-sponsored by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) [<a href="#1">1</a>] and the Research Information Network (RIN) [<a href="#2">2</a>]. The event took <em>Dealing with Sensitive Data: Managing Ethics, Security and Trust</em> as its theme [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Day_1:_10_March_2010">Day 1: 10 March 2010</h2> <p>DCC Associate Director <strong>Liz Lyon</strong> and RIN Head of Programmes <strong>Stéphane Goldstein </strong>welcomed the 45 delegates to the event, and began by introducing the keynote speaker, <strong>Iain Buchan</strong>, Professor of Public Health Informatics and Director of the Northwest Institute for Bio-Health Informatics (NIBHI), University of Manchester.</p> <p>Iain's talk was entitled <em>Opening Bio-Health Data and Models Securely and Effectively for Public Benefit</em>, and addressed three main questions:</p> <ol> <li>Where does the public's health need digital innovation?</li> <li>How can research curators promote this innovation (and what are the implications for Ethics, Security and Trust)?</li> <li>Is a framework required (covering the Social Contract and a digital and operational infrastructure)?</li> </ol> <p>A major theme in contemporary healthcare is that of <em>prevention</em>, and the need for proactive 'citizen buy-in' in order to avert NHS bankruptcy, a need supported by the use of 'persuasive technologies.' There is, however, a disconnect between the proactive public health model, and the reactive clinical model, and between expectations and available resource. 'Digital bridges', composed of new information technologies, are used to close the gaps between primary and secondary care, and to link disease-specific pathways.</p> <p>Iain touched on the impact that the data deluge is having on healthcare, reflecting that knowledge can no longer be managed solely by reading scholarly papers: the datasets and structures now extend far beyond any single study's observations. It is now necessary to build data-centred models, and to interrogate them for clusters via dedicated algorithms.</p> <p>However, there are holes in the datasets – for example, clinical trials exclude women of childbearing age and subjects undergoing certain treatments – hence electronic health records must be mined in order to fill these gaps, but this can be problematised by a lack of useful metadata, leading to 'healthcare data tombs,' repositories of health records lacking the contextual information to make them useful. Such data resources may be worse than useless: they may be misinformation.</p> <p>Comprehensible social networks with user-friendly interfaces can be used to improve the quality of metadata, based on the principle that more frequent use leads to better quality information. These networks can also bridge the Balkanisation that can occur when different groups tackle the same issue from varying standpoints (e.g. examining obesity from dietary- and exercise-based perspectives, but not sharing data across these boundaries.) The vision is for a joint, open, unifying and interdisciplinary framework and understanding wherein resources and expertise are shared. Of course, crossing these divides is accompanied by a raft of trust and security issues, and Iain described the various measures that are implemented to cope with them.</p> <p>Iain discussed the ethical issues surrounding wider use of health record information across the NHS, including consent (opt-in versus opt-out), the right (or lack thereof) of an investigator to go to a patient directly, and – perhaps most controversially – whether it was actually <em>unethical </em>to allow a health dataset to go under-exploited. If this is indeed the case, it follows that there is a real need to audit the demonstrable good that is derived from datasets.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/rdmf4-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report graham pryor martin donnelly bbc dcc jisc nhs research information network the national archives uk data archive university of bristol university of edinburgh university of london university of manchester algorithm archives curation data data management data set digital archive digital curation foi framework higher education infrastructure licence metadata preservation repositories research social networks standards ulcc Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1551 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Approximately 97 Things http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/cliff-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/cliff-rvw#author1">Pete Cliff</a> learns something new in this 'Open Source' book every time he makes the tea.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2. 2010-05-25-18-28 implementing Pete's edits -REW --><!-- v2. 2010-05-25-18-28 implementing Pete's edits -REW --><p><em>97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know.</em> From the title it should be pretty clear what we're getting, but the creation of this book is a little different. The editor goes so far as to state this is an Open Source book and likens its creation to Open Source Software development. It contains (you guessed it) 97 short (2-page) essays ('axioms'), each one contributed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence. Each presents a single pearl of wisdom from an expert in the field of Software Architecture.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/cliff-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review pete cliff bbc bodleian libraries oreilly university of oxford wikipedia creative commons licence open source software Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1554 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Product Review: The IPad and the Educator, First Impressions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw-2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/whalley-rvw-2#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reports on his initial impressions of the new Apple iPad in the first three weeks since its release in the USA and what it has to offer the mobile educator.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Triumph_of_Design_over_Function">Triumph of Design over Function?</h2> <p>So, you have seen and read the hype about the iPad [<a href="#1">1</a>]; the world release has been delayed until the US appetite has been satiated and it will be the end of May for the rest of the world. Should you buy one or is this an example of the triumph of elegant design over function? What follows is an initial view of an iPad bought in the US in April and the results of some playing around with it in the USA and then the UK. It is not a comparative test with 'netbooks' or other e-book readers (such as Kindle and Sony), although I shall make some discrete comparisons because this review stems from an earlier discussion about e-books in <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <h2 id="Main_Impressions">Main Impressions</h2> <p>One complaint about existing e-book readers was, and is, that they do not have colour screens. I want to view Web pages with images and text at a decent size and read e-books with coloured (and preferably hypertext) material. I'd like my students to have this capability too. The e-ink technology in a Kindle cannot currently offer anything other than greyscale so the iPad is immediately a 'wow' when you turn it on. The touch screen is excellent and a size that can be used to read books as well as Web pages without lots of scrolling. This was my main reason for trying the iPad as, apart of my desire to have students use a Personal Learning Environment (PLE, device plus appropriately chosen applications), the screen was a major consideration. Netbooks fill the bill to a limited extent but with the 9.7" diagonal (19.5 x 15 cm screen, portrait or landscape conversion in 1 second) the iPad is more than good. All my colleagues who have paid me £5 just to touch it have remarked on this. Have a look at the (<em>Guardian</em>) Eyewitness app [<a href="#3">3</a>] to see what it can do. The screen also provides a keyboard (scaling for the orientation) that can be used for typing rather than prodding with a finger or stylus but, as with the iPhone, you can only get numerals by shifting a key. A separate Apple Bluetooth keyboard is available which is very neat, light and allows proper typing. This review was initially typed on the iPad Notes application ('app' now of course), I have not yet tried the Apple iWorks suite and at this stage I am not using the iPad as a laptop replacement; but rather, as a lightweight device that can be used for basic notebook functionality with the ability to read text and view Web pages without strain or undue scrolling.</p> <p>The 3G version of the iPad is not yet out but, for the moment, this does not concern me; I can 'synch' my iPhone and Macbook Pro when needed and my iPhone gives me some iPhone applications of usefully increased screen size (there are lots more to come specifically for the iPad of course). Music and video (4:3 ratio) come over smoothly - and video is at a reasonable size to view rather than squinting myopically at an iPhone. The iPad was useful on a Transatlantic flight (steerage with restricted lapspace) for typing, music and film. When necessary, you can slip it beside you and need not worry about slopping your gin and tonic over a keyboard. Convenience is a great selling point about the iPad, battery life is excellent, a claimed 10 hours. It took about 6 hours to recharge from 4% capacity to full. The same power connector-USB cable (used also for data connectivity) works for the iPod and iPhone as well so you can easily charge from laptop, external AC sources, car adapter as well, as a <em>PowerMonkey </em>or similar external power source. Power efficiency is mainly due to the type of computer architecture the machine uses. It is the same Apple custom CPU (known as A4) that is used by the iPhone and so, from this point of view, the iPad is indeed a large iPhone. The architecture differs from that used on most netbooks, which are really stripped down and relatively slow and power-hungry versions of (x86 architecture) laptops. We should really think of the iPad as a new generation of small computer and it remains to be seen what Apple will develop in the future.</p> <p>Unfortunately, Digital Rights Management (DRM) meant that I could not access iTunes myself in the USA so I had to rely on my son's access to try a few things out. I now have a list of applications to experiment with but I shall not report on those here, they will have to wait until the App Store opens for iPad use in the UK. At present, you can only have one app open at a time (plus audio on the iPod application). Apple have already indicated that the next version of the OS will have multiple-tasking, that is, keeping two applications open at the same time; currently you have to switch using the discrete 'home' button. This button is on the screen, the on/off and volume controls are around the rim together with docking connector, earpiece jack socket, aperture for microphone (so you can use the iDictaphone app) and a switch to lock/unlock the screen orientation.</p> <p>I mentioned DRM earlier so the only iBooks downloaded so far are <em>Winnie the Pooh</em> and <em>Twelfth Night</em>. The former is really very good with the original E.H. Shepard coloured illustrations. They are text-searchable (did you know that the word 'hunny' only occurs three times in <em>Winnie the Pooh</em>?), there is a dictionary and the ability to change to one of five different typefaces and two sizes. The text is very clear and readable in either mode and the graphics can give you a page turn as slow or as fast as you like, neat. I also tried <em>Alice's Adventures in Wonderland</em> downloaded from <em>Stanza</em> where there is more flexibility with fonts but the text is less crisp. I downloaded apps for <em>Kindle </em>[<a href="#4">4</a>] and <em>Reader Lite </em>but did not use their offerings. I suspect that there will be improvements from most e-book vendors with iPad optimisation in the jockeying for position that appears to be going on in the e-book world. We have yet to see how the commercial textbook vendors deal with e-books for the iPad.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw-2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review brian whalley alt alt-c apple bbc google queens university belfast adobe data drm ebook flash google scholar graphics html html5 hypertext ipad iphone itunes jpg podcast usb video wiki Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1558 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Fedora UK & Ireland / EU Joint User Group Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the first coming together of two regional user groups for the Fedora digital repository system, hosted by the University of Oxford in December 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><p>The Fedora digital repository system [<a href="#1">1</a>] (as opposed to the Fedora Linux distribution, with which there is no connection) is an open source solution for the management of all types of digital content. Its development is managed through DuraSpace [<a href="#2">2</a>], the same organisation that now oversees DSpace, and carried out by developers around the world. The developers, alongside the extensive body of Fedora users, form the community that sustains Fedora.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report chris awre bbc duraspace ieee jisc kings college london stanford university technical university of denmark university of edinburgh university of hull university of oxford university of southampton university of virginia bril datashare hydra idmb cloud computing content management data data management database digital repositories dspace e-research e-science eprints fedora commons flickr framework geospatial data gis infrastructure institutional repository linux metadata mobile open source portal qr code rdbms rdf repositories research search technology software usability virtual research environment wiki xml youtube Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1531 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 61: The Double-edged Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 61.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Perhaps one of the current benchmarks for gauging when a Web technology has migrated from the cluttered desks of the technorati to the dining tables of the chatterati is if it becomes a topic for BBC Radio 4's <em>The Moral Maze</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>]. More accustomed to discussing matters such as child-rearing or a controversial pronouncement of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the panel members who, over the years have ranged from the liberal to the harrumphing illiberal (and in one case, both at the same time), recently did battle over Twitter [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 editorial richard waller bbc jisc mimas national library of wales sherpa ukoln university of birmingham university of york ojims yodl yodl-ing access control ajax archives blog curation data data set digital library digital repositories digitisation fedora commons framework geospatial data gis infrastructure institutional repository javascript ldap mobile national library open access provenance repositories research search technology software technorati twitter web 2.0 xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1505 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Share. Collaborate. Innovate. Building an Organisational Approach to Web 2.0 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/bevan <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/bevan#author1">Paul Bevan</a> outlines the National Library of Wales' development of a strategic approach to meeting user needs in a post-Web 2.0 world.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The National Library of Wales has recently published a new Strategy for the Web [<a href="#1">1</a>] which integrates Web 2.0 with the existing Web portfolio and seeks to provide an approach to Web 2.0 which is focused on the organisation. Rather than centring on technical developments, this paper outlines a strategic research approach and discusses some of the outcomes which may speak to others seeking to engage with emerging Web technologies and approaches.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/bevan" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article paul bevan bbc google national library of wales archives blog cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data digital media digitisation facebook flickr framework google analytics html ict infrastructure licence metadata mobile mobile phone national library open source portfolio research search engine optimisation search technology software tagging twitter url video web 2.0 web app web services windows youtube Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1506 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Scientific Communication through Aggregated Publications http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/hogenaar <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/hogenaar#author1">Arjan Hogenaar</a> describes changes in the publication and communication process which will mean that the role of authors will become a more prominent one.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 2, 2009-11-23-09-43, incorporating AH's 2 final edits REW --><!-- version 2, 2009-11-23-09-43, incorporating AH's 2 final edits REW --><p>The Internet has caused a revolution in the way scientists and scholars have access to scholarly output. Only 15 years ago, the (university) library decided what sources should be offered to the staff and individual scientists could only hope the librarian would listen to their wishes. In this system scientists frequently had no instantaneous access to the information they wanted. In such instances they had to rely on the Interlibrary Loan System.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/hogenaar" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article arjan hogenaar bbc elsevier oai royal netherlands academy of arts and sciences surffoundation university of groningen w3c escape project preserv aggregation archives atom content management data data model data set didl digital curation digital preservation e-research e-science fedora commons foaf frbr identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability linked data metadata oai-ore oai-pmh ontologies open access open archives initiative preservation rdf repositories research search technology semantic web tagging uri url video vocabularies web app web resources xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1509 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Live Blogging @ IWMW 2009 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/iwmw-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/iwmw-2009-rpt#author1">Kirsty McGill</a> provides a live blogger perspective on the three-day Institutional Web Managers Workshop, held by UKOLN at the University of Essex, Colchester, in July 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 12th annual Institutional Web Managers Workshop (IWMW) attracted nearly 200 delegates, making it the largest workshop in the event's history. Whilst the popularity of the physical event has grown, so too has the remote audience. So this year organisers Marieke Guy and Brian Kelly decided that it was time to start treating this remote audience as first class citizens.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/iwmw-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 event report kirsty pitkin amazon bbc cardiff university edge hill university google jisc ukoln university of essex university of glasgow university of southampton university of strathclyde devcsi iwmw accessibility ajax amazon web services api blog browser cloud computing content management css curation data database domain model e-learning facebook flickr html interoperability javascript metadata mobile netvibes photoshop preservation privacy research schema social web software streaming twitter uri video web 2.0 web development web resources web services wireframe Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1515 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The RSP Goes 'Back to School' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/strsp-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/strsp-rpt#author1">Stephanie Taylor</a> reports on the three-day residential school for repository managers run by the Repositories Support Project (RSP), held on 14-16 September 2009 in Northumberland.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I recently attended the Back to School event [<a href="#1">1</a>] run by the Repositories Support Project (RSP)[<a href="#2">2</a>] at Matfen Hall [<a href="#3">3</a>], Northumberland, where I gave a workshop on metadata and also attended the second and third days of the event as a delegate. I was sorry not to be able to attend the sessions on the first day, but arrived in time for dinner so was able to meet the delegates and other presenters.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/strsp-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 event report stephanie taylor bbc british library google jisc jisc collections kings college london open university sherpa ukoln university of bath university of east anglia university of edinburgh university of nottingham university of sunderland eris r4r recruitment toolkit repositories support project rsp wrn application profile archives avi cataloguing cerif content provider copyright data database digital archive digital media digital preservation digital repositories digitisation ejournal framework higher education infrastructure interoperability metadata preservation rae repositories research schema scholarly works application profile tagging Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1516 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h3 id="th_International_Digital_Curation_Conference_Moving_to_Multi-Scale_Science:_Managing_Complexity_and_Diversity">5th International Digital Curation Conference – Moving to Multi-Scale Science: Managing Complexity and Diversity</h3> <p>Millennium Gloucester Hotel, Kensington, London<br />2-4 December 2009<br /><a href="http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/dcc-2009/">http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/dcc-2009/</a></p> <p>The International Digital Curation Conference is an established annual event reaching out to individuals, organisations and institutions across all disciplines and domains involved in curating data for e-science and e-research.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 news and events richard waller american library association arl association of research libraries bbc british library coalition for networked information dcc digital preservation coalition harvard university jisc library of congress london school of economics mla monash university national library of finland national library of wales national science foundation northumbria university oclc research information network talis uk data archive ukoln university college dublin university of bath university of edinburgh university of essex university of strathclyde europeana aggregation archives blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation e-learning e-research e-science framework higher education infrastructure interoperability iphone mashup metadata mets mobile moodle national library open access open source podcast portal preservation remote working repositories research search technology semantic web social networks software standards url video web development xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1517 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Second International M-Libraries Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/m-libraries-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/m-libraries-2009-rpt#author1">Keren Mills</a> reports on a two-day conference exploring and sharing delivery of services and resources to users 'on the move,' via mobile and hand-held devices.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Jointly hosted by the University of British Columbia (UBC), Athabasca University, the UK Open University (OU) and Thomson Rivers University, the conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held on UBC's beautiful campus in Vancouver and covered a broad range of topics, from SMS reference to using QR codes.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/m-libraries-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 event report keren mills bbc coalition for networked information liverpool john moores university microsoft oclc open university university of bath university of cambridge yale university blog browser cataloguing cloud computing ebook ejournal javascript learning objects mobile mobile learning mobile phone mp3 multimedia open source podcast qr code research sms software tagging twitter url Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1495 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Content Architecture: Exploiting and Managing Diverse Resources http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/isko-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/isko-2009-rpt#author1">Jane Stevenson</a> gives a personal view of the recent UK conference organised by the International Society of Knowledge Organization.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/isko-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 event report jane stevenson bbc coalition for networked information google microsoft mimas oracle university college london university of cambridge university of manchester archives hub dbpedia wikipedia algorithm api archives browser cloud computing controlled vocabularies data data set database digitisation e-research framework identifier infrastructure infrastructure as a service knowledge base linked data lod metadata microsoft office multimedia ontologies open data rdf research resource description search technology semantic web software uri vocabularies wordpress xml Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1499 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Addendum to Issue 60: Snapshot of the Global Economy, Summer 2009 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/economic-snapshot <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Richard Waller collects images and links describing economic conditions in 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The snapshot taken from a high-level page from the BBC News economy pages on 31 July 2009 should give future readers a notion of the situation to which many <em>Ariadne</em> authors allude.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/economic-snapshot" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 editorial richard waller bbc Mon, 13 Jul 2009 15:58:18 +0000 editor 1664 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk