Overview of content related to 'university of edinburgh' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/12353/0?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en KAPTUR the Highlights: Exploring Research Data Management in the Visual Arts http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author1">Leigh Garrett</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author2">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author3">Carlos Silva</a> and <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author4">Anne Spalding</a> describe the exploration of the importance and nature of research data in the visual arts and requirements for their appropriate curation and preservation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>KAPTUR (2011-13) [<a href="#1">1</a>], funded by Jisc and led by the Visual Arts Data Service, was a collaborative project involving four institutional partners: the Glasgow School of Arts; Goldsmiths, University of London; University for the Creative Arts; and the University of the Arts London.&nbsp;Research data have in recent years become regarded as a valuable institutional resource and their appropriate collection, curation, publication and preservation as essential. This has been driven by a number of internal and external forces, and all UK Research Councils now require it as a condition of funding [<a href="#2">2</a>]. As a result, a network of data repositories has emerged [<a href="#3">3</a>], some funded by research councils and others by institutions themselves. However, at the outset of the project, research data management practice within the visual arts appeared to operate rather <em>ad hoc</em> with none of the specialist arts institutions within the UK having either implemented research data management policies [<a href="#4">4</a>] or established research data management systems.&nbsp; KAPTUR sought to:</p> <ul> <li>investigate the nature of visual arts research data;</li> <li>make recommendations for its effective management;</li> <li>develop a model of best practice applicable to both specialist institutions and arts departments within multidisciplinary institutions; and</li> <li>apply, test and refine the model of best practice across the four institutional partner institutions.</li> </ul> <p>This paper outlines the background and context of the project; explores the nature of visual arts research data; details the outcomes of the user and technical review; and describes the work which underwent within the partner institutions around policy formation and staff engagement.</p> <p>Led by the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS), in collaboration with the Glasgow School of Art, Goldsmiths College, University of the Arts London and University for the Creative Arts, and funded by Jisc, KAPTUR [<a href="#1">1</a>] sought to ‘...discover, create and pilot a sectoral model of best practice in the management of research data in the [visual] arts.’ [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-garrett-et-al/logo-2.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 210px;" title="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" /></p> <p>Recent years have witnessed an increasing recognition across the Higher Education sector that research data are a valuable resource and therefore its appropriate curation and preservation are essential.&nbsp; In addition, wider societal and political forces meant that research councils, teams and researchers were coming under increasing pressure to make publicly funded data freely available.&nbsp; As such the publication of research data was increasingly becoming a requirement of funding, for example the Arts and Humanities Research Council [<a href="#6">6</a>] and Medical Research Council [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Equally important was the need for increased data transparency, and to enable researchers to access existing datasets to test the validity and reliability of the data and associated research methods; to reinterpret the data; and to preserve the data for future scrutiny. In response, many universities, for example the University of Edinburgh, had established institutional research data management systems to support the deposit and preservation of research data, whilst others were in the process of piloting services, for example the University of Leicester, and establishing policies and procedures which actively support researchers to manage their data effectively, such as Canterbury Christ Church University and Northumbria University. In addition, many of the research councils themselves had established repositories, for example the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex, which curates research data in the social sciences and humanities, and the Natural Environment Research Council, which supports a network of data centres across its disciplinary areas.</p> <p>However, given the emerging landscape, at the outset of the project it was clear that very little was known about the collection, curation and usage of research data in the visual arts:&nbsp;none of the specialist arts institutions had research data management policies or infrastructure in place and evidence collected at the time indicated that practice was at best, <em>ad hoc</em>, left to individual researchers and teams with limited support or guidance. Little work had been undertaken to understand the distinctive and varied nature of research data in the visual arts, and even less to understand how these data could be collected, curated, preserved and exploited, or their potential impact assessed.</p> <p>By its very nature, research in the visual arts is highly complex and varied, often comprising a wide variety of outputs and formats which present researchers, repository managers and institutions with many discipline-specific difficulties. The methods and processes which generate this research are just as varied and complex.&nbsp; Research endeavour in the visual arts relies heavily on the physical artefact: sketchbooks, logbooks, journals, and workbooks.&nbsp; Alongside these data, a wide range of related project documentation and protocols are also created.&nbsp; While technology may offer considerable potential to support the safe storage and preservation of research and related data, and to enhance access, the highly distinctive nature of the visual arts and its research methods also present enormous technical problems with regard to formats, standards, roles and responsibilities, and policies.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article anne spalding carlos silva leigh garrett marie-therese gramstadt ahrc canterbury christ church university courtauld institute of art datacite dcc falmouth university glasgow school of art goldsmiths college hefce jisc northumbria university uk data archive university for the creative arts university of bath university of birmingham university of edinburgh university of essex university of leicester university of london university of the arts london vads kaptur keepit mrc scarlet archives augmented reality blog cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set digitisation eprints framework higher education infrastructure metadata oer open access preservation repositories research semantic web software video Mon, 01 Jul 2013 17:50:23 +0000 lisrw 2461 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making Citation Work: A British Library DataCite Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a workshop on practical data citation issues for institutions, held at the British Library, London, on 8 March 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On Friday, 8 March 2013, I attended the fifth in the series of DataCite workshops run by the British Library [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The British Library Conference Centre was the venue for this workshop on the theme 'Making Citation Work: Practical Issues for Institutions'. I counted myself lucky to get a place: the organisers had had so much interest they had started a reserve list for the event.&nbsp; I could believe it as it was standing room only at one point, though an awkwardly placed pillar may have contributed to that.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report alex ball ahds badc british library california digital library datacite dcc science and technology facilities council ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of edinburgh university of exeter university of nottingham university of york open exeter api archives blog cataloguing content negotiation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital object identifier doi framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property metadata open access persistent identifier preservation repositories research schema standards url video vocabularies Tue, 09 Jul 2013 15:38:46 +0000 lisrw 2478 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Gold Open Access: Counting the Costs http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/andrew <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/andrew#author1">Theo Andrew</a> presents new data on the cost of Gold OA publishing at the University of Edinburgh.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Research Councils UK (RCUK) have recently announced a significant amendment to their open access (OA) &nbsp;policy which requires all research papers that result from research partly or wholly funded by RCUK to be made open access [<a href="#1">1</a>]. To comply with this policy, researchers must either; a) publish in an open access journal, termed Gold OA, which often incurs an article processing charge (APC); or, b) ensure that a copy of the post-print is deposited in an appropriate repository, also known as Green OA.</p> <p>A subsequent clarification from RCUK stated that Gold OA is the preferred mechanism of choice to realise open access for outputs that they have funded and have announced the award of block grants to eligible institutions to achieve this aim [<a href="#2">2</a>]. Where a Gold OA option is unavailable, Green OA is also acceptable; however, RCUK have indicated that the decision will be ultimately left up to institutions as to which route to take [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p>Since RCUK are the major funder of research in the United Kingdom, this new policy will not only have a major impact on how researchers publish their work, but also huge implications for their budgets. Many research institutions funded by RCUK are currently investigating how they will implement this policy and are looking at the costs for open access publication, and how they can support the adoption of open access within their organisation. The ball is very much in the court of institutions to decide how to play the open access game.</p> <p>One of the key factors that will affect institutions is the cost that publishers will set for their APCs. So far RCUK have steered clear of suggesting an appropriate fee, leaving individual publishers to determine the market level of the APCs as per the current situation. Meanwhile there seems to be a huge variability in costs. There is a general expectation that over time APCs will settle to a reasonable rate and similarly journal subscriptions will lower to reflect the gradual change in business model from subscription fees to APCs. Most publishers have not yet been upfront about what impact they will have on journal subscriptions, if any, and it is hard to access and assess real-life data. RSC Publishing is one notable exception since it has introduced a system of waiving a proportion of APC fees based on institutional subscription costs.</p> <p>Much of this transition period to full open access will have to be navigated through uncharted territory, where no one has a clear handle on the costs involved. The rationale of this article is to present data on article processing charges gathered over the past five years, report on trends seen within this data, to suggest some approaches and to generally contribute to and inform the policy discussion.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>To put some rough-and-ready figures on the table, the University of Edinburgh publishes in the region of 4,000-4,500 peer-reviewed journal articles per year; this figure does not include other publication types like working papers not affected by the RCUK policy. Assuming an average Article Processing Charge (APC) of £1500 [<a href="#4">4</a>], the total publication costs to make all of these outputs Gold would be in the region of £6m. It is clear that even with guaranteed funding from HEFCE, and other funders of research, large research-intensive universities will not be able to pay for all of their research to be published under Gold OA. How to allocate funding to researchers will be a difficult choice that many institutions are currently asking themselves - will it be on a first-come-first-served basis, funder-specific, or will REF-submitted material take priority?</p> <p>Equally problematic are the difficulties we face in fully assessing an institution’s total spend on open access. Whilst it is possible to find out through aggregate sources like Web of Science how many articles are published in fully open access journals. It is virtually impossible to find out the number of open access articles published in hybrid journals as there is currently no flag in the metadata which indicates the open status of the paper. A hybrid journal is a traditional subscription journal that offers open access to individual articles upon payment of an APC. Of course it is possible to find hybrid open access content through EuropePMC.org; however this will only give a snapshot for the biomedical and life sciences. With current systems and processes it is virtually impossible to gauge this spend accurately.</p> <h2 id="Cost_Data">Cost Data</h2> <p>Unfortunately, financial data about open access publishing is scarce. The University of Edinburgh (UoE) has recently implemented account codes to allow the finance systems to track this spend going forwards; however, finding out costs retrospectively remains problematic. Furthermore, institutions are not typically in the habit of publishing this data with others. The institutions that have shared data show a degree of variability. In 2010, the foremost initial supporter and enabler of Gold Open Access publishing in the UK, the Wellcome Trust, found that the&nbsp;average cost of publication under the author-pays model was $2,367 (approximately £1,500) [<a href="#4">4</a>]. RCUK in their recent press release on block grants for open access estimate the average APC as £1,727 plus VAT [<a href="#2">2</a>], whilst, based on figures in the Finch Report, the University of Nottingham paid on average £1,216 [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p>All these figures are useful as they give a ballpark figure upon which further estimates can be based. The precise cost of individual APCs levied by publishers is generally unavailable in a form which easily enables further analysis. Typically this information is available from publisher’s Web sites; however, aggregating the data is cumbersome as there is no consistent way to interrogate the Web sites and APCs commonly vary from title to title in the publishers’ portfolio. There have been some commendable attempts to gather this information, for example the SHERPA RoMEO listing of Publishers with Paid Options for Open Access [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Here about 100 publishers have been surveyed and their APCs are listed. A large cost variance exists for some publishers’ records as individual journals often have different APCs, and also institutional subscriptions/memberships can reduce costs in a non-uniform way. It takes a lot of effort to gather these data and keep them it up to date. Other approaches have tried to crowd-source this activity, for example Ross Mounce’s survey of open access publishers, publications, licences and fees. Here approximately 130 publishers’ web sites were surveyed to find out what licences are being used on the open access content; the cost being a secondary focus of the survey. Analysis of these data shows less than 5% of publishers claiming 'open access' are fully compliant with the Budapest Declaration on Open Access [<a href="#7">7</a>].</p> <p>The data we present here is an attempt to enrich the data available to interested parties and make them available in a reusable format for further analysis. It comprises articles funded by the Wellcome Trust at the University of Edinburgh between 2007 and 2012. In total there are 260 articles published in a mixture of open access journals and traditional subscription journals with an open access option (sometimes known as hybrid). All of the journals charged an article processing fee. Overall, the total cost incurred was £452,713.40. The mean article processing charge was £1,741.21, with the median value £1,644.22. The full data can be accessed online at the Edinburgh DataShare repository [<a href="#8">8</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/andrew" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article theo andrew hefce university of edinburgh university of nottingham wellcome trust datashare sherpa romeo accessibility altmetrics blog creative commons data data management data set digital library licence metadata open access portfolio repositories research Mon, 03 Dec 2012 20:23:29 +0000 lisrw 2393 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Motivations for the Development of a Web Resource Synchronisation Framework http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author1">Stuart Lewis</a>, <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author2">Richard Jones</a> and <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author3">Simeon Warner</a> explain some of the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article describes the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework. The Framework addresses the need to synchronise resources between Web sites. &nbsp;Resources cover a wide spectrum of types, such as metadata, digital objects, Web pages, or data files. &nbsp;There are many scenarios in which the ability to perform some form of synchronisation is required. Examples include aggregators such as Europeana that want to harvest and aggregate collections of resources, or preservation services that wish to archive Web sites as they change.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 tooled up richard jones simeon warner stuart lewis aberystwyth university cornell university imperial college london jisc library of congress niso oai oclc ukoln university of edinburgh university of oxford dbpedia europeana opendoar wikipedia access control aggregation api archives atom cache cataloguing data data management data set database digital library doi dspace dublin core eprints framework ftp higher education html hypertext identifier interoperability knowledge base linked data metadata namespace national library oai-ore oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source passwords portal portfolio preservation provenance repositories research rfc rss search technology service oriented architecture software sru srw standards sword protocol syndication twitter uri url web app web resources web services xml z39.50 Mon, 03 Dec 2012 15:58:46 +0000 lisrw 2392 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23rd International CODATA Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Online Information 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/online-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the largest gathering of information professionals in Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online Information [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an interesting conference as it brings together information professionals from both the public and the private sector. The opportunity to share experiences from these differing perspectives doesn’t happen that often and brings real benefits, such as highly productive networking. This year’s Online Information, held between 20 - 21 &nbsp;November, felt like a slightly different event to previous years.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy amazon dcc google jisc microsoft mimas oclc ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of sussex datashare dmponline rdmrose scarlet schema.org wikipedia worldcat algorithm augmented reality bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories facebook flickr framework higher education identifier interoperability junaio library data licence linked data marc metadata mobile oer open data open source operating system privacy qr code rdfa remote working repositories research search technology software streaming twitter uri video vocabularies youtube Sun, 16 Dec 2012 17:10:56 +0000 lisrw 2437 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: User Studies for Digital Library Development http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/aytac-rvw#author1">Selenay Aytac</a> reviews a collection of essays on user studies and digital library development that provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>User Studies for Digital Library Development</em> provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries. While there are many books on user studies and digital library development, this work operates at the junction of these two domains and stands out for its insights, balance, and quality of its case-based investigations. The book brings together points of view from different professional communities, including practitioners as well as researchers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review selenay aytac bbc glasgow caledonian university library of congress long island university manchester metropolitan university national library of australia university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of malta university of oxford university of sheffield university of strathclyde europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data course design creative commons data digital library digital preservation e-learning framework information society metadata mobile multimedia national library open access research resource discovery usability web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:10:17 +0000 lisrw 2412 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Institutional Web Management Workshop (IWMW) 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/iwmw-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/iwmw-2012-rpt#author1">Kirsty Pitkin</a> reports on the 16th Institutional Web Management Workshop held at the University of Edinburgh's Appleton Tower between 18 - 20 July 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 16th Institutional Web Management Workshop (IWMW 12) took place at the University of Edinburgh's Appleton Tower – a building with a stunning panoramic view over the volcanic city.&nbsp; The event brought together 172 delegates and attracted an additional 165 viewers to the live video stream of the plenary sessions over the three days.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/iwmw-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report kirsty pitkin blackboard cetis dcc edina edinburgh college of art jisc london school of economics nesta open university paper.li robert gordon university university of bradford university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of glamorgan university of southampton university of york devcsi dmponline iwmw jorum accessibility api archives authentication browser bs8878 content management cookie data data management data set data visualisation database foi google refine graphics infrastructure kis licence mobile native apps oer open data open source plone preservation repositories research responsive design search engine optimisation standards storify tagging twitter ukoer url video visualisation wcag web development web services widget xcri-cap Tue, 31 Jul 2012 12:54:44 +0000 lisrw 2373 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Has Second Life Lived up to Expectations? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gorman <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/gorman#author1">Paul Gorman</a> examines to what degree Second Life has justified the claims made for it by its evangelists with particular regard to education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Second Life (SL) is a virtual world created and owned by a company called Linden Lab and was launched in 2003. By 2006, SL was increasingly visible in the UK media and by 2007 SL had secured over 600 mentions in UK newspapers and magazines [<a href="#1">1</a>]. However, media interest in SL evaporated rapidly with references to it dropping by more than 40% in 2008 and even further since. During this peak period SL attracted large investment in virtual land from multi-national corporations, businesses and also attracted significant interest from educational institutions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gorman" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article paul gorman bbc city of glasgow college glasgow caledonian university harvard university jisc linden lab university of edinburgh avatar blog e-learning facebook graphics instant messaging research second life twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2224 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Challenges in the Data Decade http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author1">Marion Tattersall</a>, <a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author2">Carmen O'Dell</a> and <a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author3">John Lewis</a> report on Institutional Challenges in the Data Decade, organised by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) in partnership with the White Rose University Consortium and held 1-3 March 2011 at the University of Sheffield.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report carmen odell john lewis marion tattersall dcc jisc national grid service national science foundation queensland university of technology uk data archive ukoln university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of leeds university of manchester university of melbourne university of oxford university of sheffield university of york beginners guide to digital preservation data train project dmtpsych jisc information environment wikipedia yodl archives blog cloud computing copyright creative commons curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation e-research fedora commons foi framework infrastructure licence metadata multimedia open data portal preservation privacy repositories research resource discovery software taxonomy usb video visualisation vle Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1631 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk International Digital Curation Conference 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on the 6th International Digital Curation Conference, held on 7-8 December 2010 in Chicago.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version v2: final edits after author review 2011-01-12 REW --><!-- version v2: final edits after author review 2011-01-12 REW --><p>The International Digital Curation Conference has been held annually by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) [<a href="#1">1</a>] since 2005, quickly establishing a reputation for high-quality presentations and papers. So much so that, as co-chair Allen Renear explained in his opening remarks, after attending the 2006 Conference in Glasgow [<a href="#2">2</a>] delegates from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) offered to bring the event to Chicago.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report alex ball cni coalition for networked information cornell university datacite dcc indiana university johns hopkins university leiden university massachusetts institute of technology michigan state university national library of australia national science foundation research information network rutgers university ukoln university of arizona university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of chicago university of edinburgh university of illinois university of oxford university of sheffield university of southampton datashare i2s2 idmb myexperiment sagecite sudamih aggregation archives ark authentication blog cataloguing collection development content management curation data data citation data management data model data set database digital curation digital library e-science eprints framework identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability irods linked data linux metadata mobile national library ontologies open access open data operating system persistent identifier preservation preservation metadata provenance rdf repositories research resource description search technology semantic web sharepoint software standards tagging tei text mining twitter video virtual research environment visualisation wiki windows xml Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1611 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk What Is a URI and Why Does It Matter? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/thompson-hs#author1">Henry S. Thompson</a> describes how recent developments in Web technology have affected the relationship between URI and resource representation and the related consequences.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>URI stands for Uniform Resource Identifier, the official name for those things you see all the time on the Web that begin <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'http:'</font> or <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'mailto:'</font>, for example <span class="style1">http://<em>www.w3.org</em>/</span>, which is the URI for the home page of the World Wide Web Consortium [<a href="#1">1</a>]. (These things were called URLs (Uniform Resource Locators) in the early days of the Web, and the change from URL to URI is either hugely significant or completely irrelevant, depending on who is talking—I have nothing to say about this issue in this article. If you have never heard of URIs (or IRIs, the even more recent fully internationalised version), but are familiar with URLs, just think 'URL' whenever you see 'URI' below.)</p> <p>Historically, URIs were mostly seen as simply the way you accessed Web pages. These pages were hand-authored, relatively stable and simply shipped out on demand. More and more often that is no longer the case; in at least three different ways:</p> <ul> <li>Web pages for reading have been complemented by pictures for viewing, videos for watching and music for listening;</li> <li>The Web is now more than a conduit for information, it is a means to a variety of ends; we use it to <em>do</em> things: purchase goods and services, contribute to forums, play games;</li> <li>The things we access on the Web are often not hand-authored or stable, but are automatically synthesised from 'deeper' data sources on demand. Furthermore, that synthesis is increasingly influenced by aspects of the way we initiate the access.</li> </ul> <p>It is against this background that I think it is worth exploring with some care what URIs were meant to be, and how they are being used in practice. In particular, I want to look at what is to be gained from a better understanding of how other kinds of identifiers work.</p> <h2 id="The_Official_Version">The Official Version</h2> <p>Insofar as there are definitive documents about all this, they all agree that URIs are, as the third initial says, <strong>identifiers</strong>, that is, names. They identify <strong>resources</strong>, and often (although not always) allow you to access <strong>representations</strong> of those resources. (Words in <strong>bold</strong> are used as technical terms—their ordinary language meaning is in many cases likely to be more confusing than helpful.)</p> <p>'Resource' names a role in a story, not an intrinsically distinguishable subset of things, just as 'referent' does in ordinary language. Things are resources because someone created a URI to identify them, not because they have some particular properties in and of themselves.</p> <p>'Representation' names a pair: a character sequence and a media type. The <strong>media type</strong> specifies how the character string should be interpreted. For example JPG or HTML or MP3 would be likely media types for representations of an image of an apple, a news report about an orchard or a recording of a Beatles song, respectively.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article henry s. thompson apple google ietf university of edinburgh w3c wikipedia aggregation ajax algorithm browser cataloguing cookie data framework gif google maps html hypertext identifier javascript jpg metadata mp3 png rfc search technology semantic web uri url web 2.0 web app xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1589 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Fringe 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt#author1">Martin Donnelly</a> (and friends) report on the Repository Fringe "unconference" held at the National e-Science Centre in Edinburgh, Scotland, over 2-3 September 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>2010 was the third year of Repository Fringe, and slightly more formally organised than its antecedents, with an increased number of discursive presentations and less in the way of organised chaos! The proceedings began on Wednesday 1 September with a one-day, pre-event SHERPA/RoMEO API Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] run by the Repositories Support Project team.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report martin donnelly cetis dcc duraspace edina google jisc open university sherpa ukoln university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of hull university of southampton university of st andrews addressing history crispool datashare depositmo hydra jorum memento repomman reposit repositories support project romeo sharegeo sneep wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data blog content management content negotiation csv curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi dspace eprints fedora commons file format framework geospatial data gis google maps hashtag html hypertext identifier infrastructure institutional repository ipad kml learning objects mashup metadata national library oer ontologies open access open source preservation repositories research rss search technology social networks solr standards tagging twitter uri video visualisation wordpress yahoo pipes Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1592 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Data Services for the Sciences: A Needs Assessment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/westra <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/westra#author1">Brian Westra</a> describes a data services needs assessment for science research staff at the University of Oregon.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Computational science and raw and derivative scientific data are increasingly important to the research enterprise of higher education institutions. Academic libraries are beginning to examine what the expansion of data-intensive e-science means to scholarly communication and information services, and some are reshaping their own programmes to support the digital curation needs of research staff. These changes in libraries may involve repurposing or leveraging existing services, and the development or acquisition of new skills, roles, and organisational structures [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>Scientific research data management is a fluid and evolving endeavour, reflective of the high rate of change in the information technology landscape, increasing levels of multi-disciplinary research, complex data structures and linkages, advances in data visualisation and analysis, and new tools capable of generating or capturing massive amounts of data.</p> <p>These factors can create a complex and challenging environment for managing data, and one in which libraries can have a significant positive role supporting e-science. A needs assessment can help to characterise scientists' research methods and data management practices, highlighting gaps and barriers [<a href="#2">2</a>], and thereby improve the odds for libraries to plan appropriately and effectively implement services in the local setting [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Methods">Methods</h2> <p>An initiative to conduct a science data services needs assessment was developed and approved in early 2009 at the University of Oregon. The initiative coincided with the hiring of a science data services librarian, and served as an initial project for the position. A researcher-centric approach to the development of services was a primary factor in using an assessment to shape services [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The goals of the project were to:</p> <ul> <li>define the information services needs of science research staff;</li> <li>inform the Libraries and other stakeholders of gaps in the current service structures; and</li> <li>identify research groups or staff who would be willing to participate in, and whose datasets would be good subjects for, pilot data curation projects.</li> </ul> <p>The library took the lead role on the assessment, consulting with other stakeholders in its development and implementation. Campus Information Services provided input on questions regarding campus information technology infrastructure, and to avoid unnecessary overlap with other IT service activities focused on research staff. The Vice President for Research and other organisational units were advised of the project and were asked for referrals to potential project participants. These units provided valuable input in the selection of staff contacts. Librarian subject specialists also suggested staff who might be working with data and interested in participating. Librarians responsible for digital collections, records management, scholarly communications, and the institutional repository were involved in the development of the assessment questions and project plan.</p> <p>The questions used in the assessment were developed through an iterative process. A literature and Web review located several useful resources and examples. These included the University of Minnesota Libraries' study of scientists' research behaviours [<a href="#3">3</a>], and a study by Henty, et al. on the data management practices of Australian researchers [<a href="#5">5</a>]. The Data Audit Framework (DAF - now called the Data Asset Framework) methodology was considered to provide the most comprehensive set of questions with a field-tested methodology and guidelines [<a href="#6">6</a>][<a href="#7">7</a>][<a href="#8">8</a>][<a href="#9">9</a>][<a href="#10">10</a>][<a href="#11">11</a>]. The stages outlined in the DAF methodology were also instructive, although we elected not to execute a process for identifying and classifying assets (DAF Stage 2), since the organisational structure of our departments and institutes are not conducive to that level of investigation. From the beginning it was recognised that recruitment of scientists was based as much on their willingness to participate as their responsibility for any specific class or type of research-generated data.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/westra" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article brian westra arl edina imperial college london jisc johns hopkins university microsoft uk data archive university of edinburgh university of essex university of glasgow university of illinois university of oregon university of oxford university of washington archives authentication csv curation data data management data set data visualisation database digital curation digital library drupal e-research e-science file format framework gis higher education infrastructure institutional repository metadata mysql open access provenance repositories research usability visualisation Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1568 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Repositories 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/or-10-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/or-10-rpt#author1">Philip Hunter</a> and <a href="/issue64/or-10-rpt#author2">Robin Taylor</a> report on the Open Repositories Conference held in Madrid between 6 -9 July 2010 at the Palacio de Congresos.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The air temperature in Madrid was around 37ºC when the Edinburgh contingent arrived in mid-afternoon on 5 July. The excellent air-conditioned Metro took us all the way into town - about 14km - for only 2 Euros. We were told later that the temperature during the preceding week had been about 21ºC, but by the end of the conference week we were enjoying 39ºC. The conference venue turned out to be opposite the Santiago Bernabeu stadium (home of Real Madrid), in Paseo de la Castellana.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/or-10-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report philip hunter robin taylor cornell university duraspace elsevier google microsoft orcid university of edinburgh university of london university of oxford university of southampton depositmo devcsi blog curation data database digital library digital repositories dspace eprints equella facebook fedora commons framework google analytics higher education identifier institutional repository metadata microsoft office open access repositories research research information management search technology software solr standards sword protocol tagging Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1571 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2010: The Mobile University http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt#author1">Shailey Minocha</a> reflects on the one-day symposium organised by Eduserv in May 2010. The aim of the event was to discuss whether and how mobile technology will play a significant role in the delivery of UK Higher Education in the future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report shailey minocha blackboard canterbury christ church university edge hill university eduserv google massachusetts institute of technology open university oucs ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of edinburgh university of oxford university of plymouth university of sheffield university of wolverhampton itunes u accessibility ajax android augmented reality blog browser cataloguing cloud computing data e-learning facebook framework higher education html html5 infrastructure ipad iphone itunes junaio location-based services mobile mobile learning mobile phone open source operating system podcast qr code research search technology smartphone sms social software software twitter url usability video web 2.0 web services webkit wiki wikitude wireless Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1573 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk International UPA 2010 Conference User Experience Design for the World http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/upa-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/upa-2010-rpt#author1">Liza Zamboglou</a> and <a href="/issue64/upa-2010-rpt#author2">Lorraine Paterson</a> report on the Usability Professionals' Association's International Conference held in Munich, Germany in May 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We were fortunate enough to attend the UPA 2010 International Conference [<a href="#2">2</a>] which was recently held in the Bayerischer Hof Hotel in Munich, a beautiful hotel which has accommodated numerous famous guests in the past ranging from Paris Hilton to the Dalai Lama. The conferences main focus this year was on how UX professionals can create great user experiences across different cultures.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/upa-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report liza zamboglou lorraine paterson jisc national e-science centre oracle university of edinburgh aquabrowser ux2.0 avatar data digital library e-science mobile research resource discovery search technology smartphone usability video Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1578 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Usability Inspection of Digital Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paterson-low <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/paterson-low#author1">Lorraine Paterson</a> and <a href="/issue63/paterson-low#author2">Boon Low</a> highlight findings from the usability inspection report conducted for the UX2.0 research project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paterson-low" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article boon low lorraine paterson american library association british library iso jisc national e-science centre oreilly university of edinburgh aquabrowser europeana jisc information environment ux2.0 worldcat accessibility ajax cataloguing digital library e-science facebook framework ict interoperability personalisation research resource discovery search technology social networks software standardisation standards tag cloud twitter usability web 2.0 Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1543 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Fourth DCC-RIN Research Data Management Forum http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/rdmf4-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/rdmf4-rpt#author1">Martin Donnelly</a> and <a href="/issue63/rdmf4-rpt#author2">Graham Pryor</a> report on the fourth Research Data Management Forum event, on the theme "Dealing with Sensitive Data: Managing Ethics, Security and Trust," organised by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) and Research Information Network (RIN) in Manchester, England, over 10 - 11 March, 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The fourth meeting of the Research Data Management Forum was held in Manchester on 10 and 11 March 2010, co-sponsored by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) [<a href="#1">1</a>] and the Research Information Network (RIN) [<a href="#2">2</a>]. The event took <em>Dealing with Sensitive Data: Managing Ethics, Security and Trust</em> as its theme [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Day_1:_10_March_2010">Day 1: 10 March 2010</h2> <p>DCC Associate Director <strong>Liz Lyon</strong> and RIN Head of Programmes <strong>Stéphane Goldstein </strong>welcomed the 45 delegates to the event, and began by introducing the keynote speaker, <strong>Iain Buchan</strong>, Professor of Public Health Informatics and Director of the Northwest Institute for Bio-Health Informatics (NIBHI), University of Manchester.</p> <p>Iain's talk was entitled <em>Opening Bio-Health Data and Models Securely and Effectively for Public Benefit</em>, and addressed three main questions:</p> <ol> <li>Where does the public's health need digital innovation?</li> <li>How can research curators promote this innovation (and what are the implications for Ethics, Security and Trust)?</li> <li>Is a framework required (covering the Social Contract and a digital and operational infrastructure)?</li> </ol> <p>A major theme in contemporary healthcare is that of <em>prevention</em>, and the need for proactive 'citizen buy-in' in order to avert NHS bankruptcy, a need supported by the use of 'persuasive technologies.' There is, however, a disconnect between the proactive public health model, and the reactive clinical model, and between expectations and available resource. 'Digital bridges', composed of new information technologies, are used to close the gaps between primary and secondary care, and to link disease-specific pathways.</p> <p>Iain touched on the impact that the data deluge is having on healthcare, reflecting that knowledge can no longer be managed solely by reading scholarly papers: the datasets and structures now extend far beyond any single study's observations. It is now necessary to build data-centred models, and to interrogate them for clusters via dedicated algorithms.</p> <p>However, there are holes in the datasets – for example, clinical trials exclude women of childbearing age and subjects undergoing certain treatments – hence electronic health records must be mined in order to fill these gaps, but this can be problematised by a lack of useful metadata, leading to 'healthcare data tombs,' repositories of health records lacking the contextual information to make them useful. Such data resources may be worse than useless: they may be misinformation.</p> <p>Comprehensible social networks with user-friendly interfaces can be used to improve the quality of metadata, based on the principle that more frequent use leads to better quality information. These networks can also bridge the Balkanisation that can occur when different groups tackle the same issue from varying standpoints (e.g. examining obesity from dietary- and exercise-based perspectives, but not sharing data across these boundaries.) The vision is for a joint, open, unifying and interdisciplinary framework and understanding wherein resources and expertise are shared. Of course, crossing these divides is accompanied by a raft of trust and security issues, and Iain described the various measures that are implemented to cope with them.</p> <p>Iain discussed the ethical issues surrounding wider use of health record information across the NHS, including consent (opt-in versus opt-out), the right (or lack thereof) of an investigator to go to a patient directly, and – perhaps most controversially – whether it was actually <em>unethical </em>to allow a health dataset to go under-exploited. If this is indeed the case, it follows that there is a real need to audit the demonstrable good that is derived from datasets.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/rdmf4-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report graham pryor martin donnelly bbc dcc jisc nhs research information network the national archives uk data archive university of bristol university of edinburgh university of london university of manchester algorithm archives curation data data management data set digital archive digital curation foi framework higher education infrastructure licence metadata preservation repositories research social networks standards ulcc Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1551 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information Science in Transition http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews an edited volume published to commemorate the founding of the Institute of Information Scientists in 1958.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3. 2010-05-19-13-35 REW updating with minor edits from author --><!-- v3. 2010-05-19-13-35 REW updating with minor edits from author --><p>Until it joined with the Library Association in 2002 to form the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), the Institute of Information Scientists was a professional organisation for those primarily working in scientific and technical information work. The chapters in this volume were first published in 2008 as a special issue of the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> to commemorate the founding of the institute in 1958. In accordance with this, many of the chapters provide a retrospective - sometimes even anecdotal - overview of developments in information science in the UK since the 1950s. While the approach of the volume is thematic, a major focus is on key initiatives and individuals, the latter including such luminaries as Jason Farradane, Cyril Cleverden and Karen Spärk Jones.</p> <p>Following a guest editorial by Brian Vickery, there are sixteen chapters in the book. While each chapter stands alone, conceptually the volume moves - with some exceptions - from largely retrospective reviews of past progress in information science by scholars of the older generation to overviews of current trends and technologies by their younger colleagues. Vickery's editorial tries to place information science in its historical context, explaining how the advent of digital computers and the Internet has transformed the discipline dramatically while simultaneously making its future more uncertain. This is also a view articulated by several of the volume contributors.</p> <p>The opening chapter is an attempt by Jack Meadows to discern the main research themes in UK information science over the past 50 years. A survey of the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> and other journals showed that the predominant theme was information retrieval, but that there was also important research being undertaken into information seeking, communication and bibliometrics. The chapter also tries to delineate some of the factors affecting information science research in the UK, for example noting the negative consequences of the demise of the old British Library Research and Development Department in the 1990s [<a href="#1">1</a>]. He concludes, however, on a positive note, pointing out that 'activities that were relatively marginal decades ago - such as automated information retrieval - are now at the heart of major growth industries' (p. 17). He also notes that the widening interest in information science concepts has brought in researchers from other disciplines - which is probably one of the key lessons of the whole book. In the second chapter, David Bawden (City University) again uses the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> as a means of exploring the development of the information science discipline itself, focusing on the underlying philosophical bases of the subject proposed by scholars like Bertie Brookes and Jason Farradane.</p> <p>The third chapter is by Stella Dextre Clarke. This is a retrospective of fifty years of knowledge organisation work in the information science domain that takes a partly anecdotal approach, attempting to illustrate 'how it felt to work in those times' (p. 45). Perhaps the best aspect of this is that it enables Dextre Clarke to give the reader a feel for what information retrieval could be like in the card-based pre-computer age. The chapter opens with a brief overview of the state of subject classification in the late 1950s, noting the continued practical predominance of enumerative schemes like the Dewey Decimal Classification while the theoreticians S. R. Ranganathan and Henry E. Bliss were still working away developing their (then) revolutionary ideas of 'faceted classification.' The focus then changes to the development of thesauri, noting the importance of Jean Aitchison's pioneering work on thesaurus construction. Dextre Clarke then provides a very brief overview of the role of controlled vocabularies in the early information retrieval tests conducted as part of the Aslib-Cranfield Research Project, a topic covered in more detail in the following chapter. Finally, moving to the present day, Dextre Clarke notes the continued importance of controlled vocabularies in the form of taxonomies and provides some pointers for a future Semantic Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review michael day british library cilip edinburgh napier university indiana university library association london school of economics loughborough university microsoft stm ukoln university of bath university of brighton university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of wolverhampton citeulike bibliographic data bibliometrics blog controlled vocabularies copyright data data mining data set database dewey decimal digital library ejournal facebook flickr ict information retrieval institutional repository metadata national library open access privacy repositories research rss second life semantic web social software standards thesaurus twitter vocabularies web 2.0 wiki youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1555 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Targets: Web Preservation and Reference Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/davis <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/davis#author1">Richard Davis</a> discusses the role of Web preservation in reference management. This article is based on a presentation given at the Innovations in Reference Management workshop, January 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3: amended in light of author's further final-read revisions 2010-02-12-11-11 rew --><!-- v3: amended in light of author's further final-read revisions 2010-02-12-11-11 rew --><p>It seems fair to say that the lion's share of work on developing online tools for reference and citation management by students and researchers has focused on familiar types of publication. They generally comprise resources that can be neatly and discretely bound in the covers of a book or journal, or their electronic analogues, like the Portable Document Format (PDF): objects in established library or database systems, with ISBNs and ISSNs underwritten by the authority of formal publication and legal deposit.</p> <p>Yet, increasingly, native Web resources are also becoming eminently citable, and managing both the resources, and references to them, is an ongoing challenge. Moreover, the issues associated with referencing this kind of material have received comparatively little attention, beyond introducing the convention that includes the URL and the date it was accessed in bibliographies. While it may be hard to quantify the "average lifespan of a web page" [<a href="#1">1</a>], what is undeniable is that Web resources are highly volatile and prone to deletion or amendment without warning.</p> <p>Web Preservation is one field of endeavour which attempts to counter the Web's transient tendency, and a variety of approaches continue to be explored. The aim of this article is to convey the fairly simple message that many themes and concerns of Web preservation are equally relevant in the quest for effective reference management in academic research, particularly given the rate at which our dependence on Web-delivered resources is growing.</p> <p>Digital preservation is, naturally, a strong theme in the work of the University of London Computer Centre (ULCC)'s Digital Archives Department, and Web preservation has featured particularly strongly in recent years. This article will draw upon several initiatives with which we have been involved recently. These include: the 2008 JISC Preservation of Web Resources Project (JISC-PoWR) [<a href="#2">2</a>], on which we worked with Brian Kelly and Marieke Guy of UKOLN; our work for the UK Web Archiving Consortium; and the ongoing JISC ArchivePress Project [<a href="#3">3</a>] (itself, in many ways, a sequel to JISC-PoWR).</p> <p>Another perspective that I bring is as a part-time student myself, on the MSc E-Learning programme at Edinburgh University. As a consequence I have papers to read, and write, and a dissertation imminent. So for this reason too I have a stake in making it easier to keep track of information for reading lists, footnotes and bibliographies, whether with desktop tools or Web-based tools, or through features in online VLEs, databases and repositories.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/davis" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article richard davis british library dcc digital preservation coalition google intute jisc leiden university the national archives ukoln university of edinburgh university of london wellcome trust internet archive jisc information environment powr wikipedia archives atom blog browser cache content management cool uri copyright data database digital archive digital curation digital preservation document format e-learning framework higher education identifier metadata open access open source preservation repositories research rss standards ulcc uri url wayback machine web 2.0 web app web resources web standards wiki wordpress Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1523 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Fedora UK & Ireland / EU Joint User Group Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the first coming together of two regional user groups for the Fedora digital repository system, hosted by the University of Oxford in December 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><p>The Fedora digital repository system [<a href="#1">1</a>] (as opposed to the Fedora Linux distribution, with which there is no connection) is an open source solution for the management of all types of digital content. Its development is managed through DuraSpace [<a href="#2">2</a>], the same organisation that now oversees DSpace, and carried out by developers around the world. The developers, alongside the extensive body of Fedora users, form the community that sustains Fedora.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report chris awre bbc duraspace ieee jisc kings college london stanford university technical university of denmark university of edinburgh university of hull university of oxford university of southampton university of virginia bril datashare hydra idmb cloud computing content management data data management database digital repositories dspace e-research e-science eprints fedora commons flickr framework geospatial data gis infrastructure institutional repository linux metadata mobile open source portal qr code rdbms rdf repositories research search technology software usability virtual research environment wiki xml youtube Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1531 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The RSP Goes 'Back to School' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/strsp-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/strsp-rpt#author1">Stephanie Taylor</a> reports on the three-day residential school for repository managers run by the Repositories Support Project (RSP), held on 14-16 September 2009 in Northumberland.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I recently attended the Back to School event [<a href="#1">1</a>] run by the Repositories Support Project (RSP)[<a href="#2">2</a>] at Matfen Hall [<a href="#3">3</a>], Northumberland, where I gave a workshop on metadata and also attended the second and third days of the event as a delegate. I was sorry not to be able to attend the sessions on the first day, but arrived in time for dinner so was able to meet the delegates and other presenters.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/strsp-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 event report stephanie taylor bbc british library google jisc jisc collections kings college london open university sherpa ukoln university of bath university of east anglia university of edinburgh university of nottingham university of sunderland eris r4r recruitment toolkit repositories support project rsp wrn application profile archives avi cataloguing cerif content provider copyright data database digital archive digital media digital preservation digital repositories digitisation ejournal framework higher education infrastructure interoperability metadata preservation rae repositories research schema scholarly works application profile tagging Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1516 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h3 id="th_International_Digital_Curation_Conference_Moving_to_Multi-Scale_Science:_Managing_Complexity_and_Diversity">5th International Digital Curation Conference – Moving to Multi-Scale Science: Managing Complexity and Diversity</h3> <p>Millennium Gloucester Hotel, Kensington, London<br />2-4 December 2009<br /><a href="http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/dcc-2009/">http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/dcc-2009/</a></p> <p>The International Digital Curation Conference is an established annual event reaching out to individuals, organisations and institutions across all disciplines and domains involved in curating data for e-science and e-research.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 news and events richard waller american library association arl association of research libraries bbc british library coalition for networked information dcc digital preservation coalition harvard university jisc library of congress london school of economics mla monash university national library of finland national library of wales national science foundation northumbria university oclc research information network talis uk data archive ukoln university college dublin university of bath university of edinburgh university of essex university of strathclyde europeana aggregation archives blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation e-learning e-research e-science framework higher education infrastructure interoperability iphone mashup metadata mets mobile moodle national library open access open source podcast portal preservation remote working repositories research search technology semantic web social networks software standards url video web development xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1517 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk A DRY CRIG Event for the IE Demonstrator http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/ie-testbed-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/ie-testbed-rpt#author1">Paul Walk</a> reports on an 'unconference' for developers working in and around the JISC Information Environment and institutional systems, hosted by UKOLN at the University of Bath in June 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/ie-testbed-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 event report paul walk aberystwyth university edina google jisc mimas oai ordnance survey ukoln university of bath university of edinburgh university of glamorgan university of manchester university of strathclyde jisc information environment api blog controlled vocabularies data data set database digital library geospatial data gis handle system higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer interoperability java lcsh licence metadata oai-ore persistent identifier preservation privacy python repositories research restful search technology semantic web skos soap software url vocabularies web services Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1416 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="headlines"></a><a name="events1"></a></p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 news and events richard waller arl association of research libraries bbc becta birkbeck college cardiff university cni coalition for networked information dcc edina elsevier hefce institute of physics jisc massachusetts institute of technology mcn mla national science foundation newcastle university oai open university oxford university computing services research information network tasi university of edinburgh university of leeds university of london university of manchester university of oxford powr apache apache license archives bibliographic data copyright css data database digital library digital repositories dspace dublin core e-learning e-science fedora commons framework further education higher education ict infrastructure interoperability licence metadata national library open access open source open standard photoshop podcast portal preservation repositories research rss saml search technology software standards web 2.0 web development web resources web services wiki Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1420 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Foundation Symposium 2007: Virtual Worlds, Real Learning? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/eduserv-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue52/eduserv-rpt#author1">Paul Walk</a> reports on the Eduserv Foundation Symposium which took as its theme 'Virtual Worlds, Real Learning?' and which was primarily concerned with educational uses for Second Life.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/eduserv-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 event report paul walk eduserv ibm linden lab ukoln university of bath university of edinburgh university of leicester accessibility avatar data database e-learning intranet privacy research second life software video visualisation Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1341 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Cambridge History of Libraries in Britain and Ireland http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/maccoll-dempsey-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue52/maccoll-dempsey-rvw#author1">John MacColl</a> reviews the first two volumes of this very substantial three-part work, covering the periods to 1640 and 1640-1850.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Cambridge University Press has, with the first two volumes of its three-volume history of libraries in Britain and Ireland, provided a wealth of fascinating information on the development of libraries and librarianship from a sterling collection of historians and scholar librarians. The publication of an edited history results in a denser packing of detail than would be achieved by a work of single authorship, since so many specialists each have an abundance of knowledge to cram into their relatively small allocations of space.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/maccoll-dempsey-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 review john maccoll university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of oxford internet archive worldcat archives cataloguing curation database digital curation digital library passwords repositories research Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1343 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The W3C Technical Architecture Group http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/thompson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/thompson#author1">Henry S. Thompson</a> introduces the W3C Technical Architecture Group and its work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/thompson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 feature article henry s. thompson google ibm ietf massachusetts institute of technology oasis sun microsystems university of cambridge university of edinburgh w3c archives cataloguing doi html identifier metadata namespace passwords rdf research schema search technology semantic web sgml uri urn xhtml xml xml schema Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1306 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 2nd International DCC Conference 2006: Digital Data Curation in Practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/2-dcc-conf-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Alexander Ball and <a href="/issue50/2-dcc-conf-rpt#author2">Manjula Patel</a> provide an overview of the second annual conference of the Digital Curation Centre.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The International Digital Curation Conference is held annually by the Digital Curation Centre [<a href="#1">1</a>] to bring together researchers in the field and promote discussion of policy and strategy. The second conference in this series [<a href="#2">2</a>], with the theme 'digital data curation in practice', was held between 21-22 November 2006 in Glasgow.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/2-dcc-conf-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 event report alex ball manjula patel ahds badc coalition for networked information codata dcc jisc johns hopkins university massachusetts institute of technology niso sherpa the national archives ukoln university of bath university of cambridge university of chicago university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of illinois university of liverpool university of southampton university of stirling ebank uk preserv r4l algorithm application profile archives bibliographic data blog copyright creative commons curation data data management data mining data set database digital archive digital curation digital library digital preservation droid dspace e-science file format flickr framework frbr html infrastructure irods java metadata national library open access open data open source preservation repositories research software web services wiki Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1296 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="headlines"></a><a name="events1"></a>Technical Advisory Service for Images (TASI) Training Programme</p> <p>Either: Birmingham, Bristol or London, 8 February to 27 April 2007<br /><a href="http://www.tasi.ac.uk/training/">http://www.tasi.ac.uk/training/</a></p> <p>The TASI programme of practical hands-on training includes three brand new workshops:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 news and events richard waller british library cerlim cilip google intute jisc london school of economics manchester metropolitan university mla oai royal netherlands academy of arts and sciences simon fraser university stanford university tasi ukoln university college dublin university of bristol university of edinburgh university of london university of manchester university of wales university of york internet archive iwmw jisc information environment accessibility ajax apache application profile archives atom bibliographic data blog cataloguing collection development copyright data data set database digital curation digital repositories digitisation dissemination dublin core electronic theses firefox free software geospatial data gis higher education ict infrastructure intellectual property internet explorer interoperability licence lucene marc metadata multimedia namespace oai-pmh ontologies open access open data open source photoshop preservation privacy repositories research rss search technology software standards syndication tagging taxonomy url video web 2.0 web development web services youtube Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1299 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk A Foundation for Automatic Digital Preservation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/ferreira-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/ferreira-et-al#author1">Miguel Ferreira</a>, <a href="/issue48/ferreira-et-al#author2">Ana Alice Baptista</a> and <a href="/issue48/ferreira-et-al#author3">Jose Carlos Ramalho</a> propose a Service-Oriented Architecture to help cultural heritage institutions to accomplish automatic digital preservation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Efforts to archive a large amount of digital material are being developed by many cultural heritage institutions. We have evidence of this in the numerous initiatives aiming to harvest the Web [<a href="#1">1-5</a>] together with the impressive burgeoning of institutional repositories [<a href="#6">6</a>]. However, getting the material inside the archive is just the beginning for any initiative concerned with the long-term preservation of digital materials.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/ferreira-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 feature article ana alice baptista jose carlos ramalho miguel ferreira carnegie mellon university d-lib magazine dcc digital preservation coalition google harvard university ieee ifla library of congress oais oasis oclc premis the national archives university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of minho crib reposit algorithm archives ascii bibliographic data controlled vocabularies data data set database digital archive digital curation digital library digital media digital preservation digital record object identification digital repositories dissemination document format drm droid dspace dublin core eprints fedora commons file format framework google trends graphics identifier interoperability java jstor knowledge base licence metadata open source operating system preservation preservation metadata repositories research semantic web service oriented architecture service registry soa soap software standards taxonomy uddi video vocabularies wayback machine web services wsdl xml Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1254 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Email Curation: Practical Approaches for Long-term Preservation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/curating-email-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/curating-email-rpt#author1">Dave Thompson</a> reports on a two-day conference on Email Curation organised by the Digital Curation Centre.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/curating-email-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 event report dave thompson bbc british library dcc loughborough university university of edinburgh university of oxford w3c wellcome library archives curation data digital curation foia framework infrastructure intellectual property metadata preservation privacy research social networks visualisation xml Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1257 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk JISC/CNI Conference, York 2006 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/jisc-cni-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/jisc-cni-rpt#author1">Najla Semple</a> and <a href="/issue48/jisc-cni-rpt#author2">Robin Rice</a> were at the JISC / CNI conference 'Envisioning future challenges in networked information'.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Encapsulating the events of such an information-rich event as the JISC / CNI conference can be a tricky task, but the next few lines will, we hope, deliver a flavour of the occasion as well as a summary of a few significant themes.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/jisc-cni-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 event report najla semple robin rice cni cornell university digital preservation coalition edina google jisc library of congress ukoln university college london university of edinburgh university of virginia wellcome trust didet jisc information environment content management copyright data data model data set digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation e-science eprints fedora commons google books google search higher education ict infrastructure interoperability jstor licence metadata open access open source portal preservation provenance repositories research resource discovery search technology software vle web 2.0 Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1258 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Rustle of Digital Curation: The JISC Annual Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt#author1">Julie Allinson</a>, <a href="/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt#author2">Marieke Guy</a> and <a href="/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt#author3">Maureen Pennock</a> find themselves contemplating e-frameworks, digital curation and repositories at the JISC Annual Conference.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On 14 March 2006 we found ourselves back at the Birmingham International Convention Centre (ICC) for the 2006 JISC Conference. The annual conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] is both an opportunity for JISC to platform the variety of activities it funds and for delegates to learn about the full range of JISC's work by participating in seminars, debates, workshops and demonstrations. This report tries to capture the air of the event through a series of session snapshots.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 event report julie allinson marieke guy maureen pennock british library cclrc coalition for networked information dcc dest digital preservation coalition edina google hefce intute jisc jisc collections london school of economics mimas ogc open geospatial consortium sherpa ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of southampton wellcome trust cd-lor claddier e-framework jisc information environment jorum romeo api archives blog cataloguing copyright curation data data set database digital curation digital preservation digital repositories digitisation e-learning e-research eportfolio eprints flash framework geospatial data gis google maps higher education ict infrastructure institutional repository interoperability learning design learning objects metadata open access open source preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology text mining vocabularies wireless wms xml Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1235 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 46: Ten Years of Pathfinding http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue46/editorial#author1">John MacColl</a>, <a href="/issue46/editorial#author2">Lorcan Dempsey</a> and <a href="/issue46/editorial#author3">John Kirriemuir</a> reflect in turn on the rationale and history of the founding of <em>Ariadne</em>.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Ten_Years_of_Pathfinding"><a name="maccoll_editorial"></a>Ten Years of Pathfinding</h2> <p class="byline"><a href="#author2"><strong>John MacColl</strong></a> reflects upon the choice of <em>Ariadne</em>'s name in the light of the publication's guiding mission.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue46 editorial john kirriemuir john maccoll lorcan dempsey richard waller dcc google jisc oclc ukoln university of abertay dundee university of edinburgh university of sheffield elib theseus blog cataloguing digital curation digital library digitisation ejournal framework higher education information retrieval programmable web rae research resource discovery search technology shared resource software url video Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1204 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Google Challenges for Academic Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/maccoll <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue46/maccoll#author1">John MacColl</a> analyses the reactions many academic libraries may be having to the range of tools Google is currently rolling out and outlines a strategy for institutions in the face of such potentially radical developments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Introduction:_A_-Googly-_for_Libraries">Introduction: A 'Googly' for Libraries?</h2> <blockquote><p>A googly, or a 'wrong'un', is a delivery which looks like a normal leg spinner but actually turns towards the batsmen, like an off break, rather than away from the bat. (BBC Sport Academic Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Search result found in Google).</p></blockquote> <p>How should we understand Google? Libraries still feel like the batsman at whom something has been bowled which looks familiar, but then turns out to be a nasty threat.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/maccoll" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue46 feature article john maccoll amazon bbc d-lib magazine google harvard university oclc talis university of edinburgh university of oxford jisc information environment project gutenberg algorithm atom bibliographic data blog copyright database digital library digitisation ebook flash google scholar openurl portfolio research search technology vocabularies Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1210 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Excuse Me... Some Digital Preservation Fallacies? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/rusbridge <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue46/rusbridge#author1">Chris Rusbridge</a> argues with himself about some of the assumptions behind digital preservation thinking.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Excuse_me...">Excuse me...</h2> <p>I have been asked to write an article for the tenth anniversary of <em>Ariadne</em>, a venture that I have enjoyed, off and on, since its inception in 1996 as part of the eLib Programme, of which I was then Programme Director.</p> <p>Some years ago I wrote an article entitled "After eLib" [<a href="#1">1</a>] for <em>Ariadne</em>. The original suggestion was for a follow-up "even more after eLib"; however, I now work for JISC, and that probably makes it hard to be objective!</p> <p>In "After eLib", I wrote this paragraph about digital preservation:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/rusbridge" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue46 feature article chris rusbridge andrew w mellon foundation british library california digital library d-lib magazine dcc harvard university jisc microsoft national library of the netherlands oais the national archives university of edinburgh elib internet archive archives browser curation data digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories file format gopher graphics infrastructure interoperability metadata microsoft office national library open source preservation preservation metadata provenance repositories research software wayback machine web browser Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1211 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Putting the Library Into the Institution: Using JSR 168 and WSRP to Enable Search Within Portal Frameworks http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/awre <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue45/awre#author1">Chris Awre</a>, <a href="/issue45/awre#author2">Stewart Waller</a>, <a href="/issue45/awre#author3">Jon Allen</a>, <a href="/issue45/awre#author4">Matthew J Dovey</a>, <a href="/issue45/awre#author5">Jon Hunter</a> and <a href="/issue45/awre#author6">Ian Dolphin</a> describe the investigations and technical development undertaken within the JISC-funded Contextual Resource Evaluation Environment (CREE) Project to enable the presentation of existing search tools within portal frameworks using the JSR 168 and WSRP portlet standards.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Under the aegis of the UK Joint Information Systems Committee's (JISC) Portals Programme [<a href="#1">1</a>] development projects have taken place to investigate the use of portals as the presentation path for a variety of search tools. A major output from these projects has been the development of a portal interface, a Web site that users could come to in order to make use of the functionality that the portal provided, particularly searching. Each project, as a key part of its investigations, created its own such interface and Web site.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/awre" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue45 feature article chris awre ian dolphin jon allen jon hunter matthew dovey stewart waller ahds d-lib magazine edina google ibm jisc oasis oracle oxford university computing services university of edinburgh university of hull university of oxford university of york cree jafer libportal wikipedia aggregation apache api cataloguing content management data file format framework geospatial data gis html infrastructure interoperability intranet java managed learning environment open source perl portal repositories schema search technology software standards stylesheet uportal url vle web portal web services wsrp xml xml schema xslt z39.50 Sat, 29 Oct 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1185 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Focus: Must Email Die? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/web-focus <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue45/web-focus#author1">Brian Kelly</a> recently gave a talk on this subject at the Internet Librarian International 2005 conference. In this article he expands on the talk and revisits the question as to whether email really should disappear.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="The_ILI_2005_Conference">The ILI 2005 Conference</h2> <p>The ILI (Internet Librarian International) 2005 Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>], the seventh in the series, was held in the Copthorne Tara Hotel, London over 10-11 September 2005. This conference is aimed at information professionals and librarians who are using, developing and implementing Internet, Intranet and Web-based services in their daily work.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/web-focus" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue45 tooled up brian kelly ahds bbc google jisc kings college london microsoft ucisa ukoln university of bath university of edinburgh university of liverpool archives blog flickr higher education html infrastructure instant messaging interoperability intranet licence metadata open source portal rdf rss search technology sms software standards syndication url video web development wiki Sat, 29 Oct 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1195 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk