Overview of content related to 'google books' http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/12416/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Developing a Prototype Library WebApp for Mobile Devices http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author1">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author2">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the development of a prototype WebApp to improve access to Library systems at Loughborough University for mobile devices.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Reviewing Loughborough University Library’s Web site statistics over a 12-month period (October 2011 – September 2012) showed a monthly average of 1,200 visits via mobile devices (eg smart phones and tablet computers). These visits account for 4% of the total monthly average visits; but plotting the percentage of visits per month from such mobile devices demonstrated over the period a steady increase, rising from 2% to 8%.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper apple google loughborough university w3c adobe ajax android apache api authentication blog browser cache cataloguing content management cookie css data framework google books html html5 ipad iphone itunes java javascript jquery json library management systems local storage metadata mobile native app native apps open source passwords perl restful rss standards tablet computer url vocabularies web app web browser web development widget xhtml xml Mon, 10 Jun 2013 13:33:09 +0000 admin 2438 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The E-copyright Handbook http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/oppenheim-rvw#author1">Charles Oppenheim</a> takes a look at the latest of Paul Pedley’s copyright guidance books, and, in some respects, finds it wanting.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Paul Pedley is a name that needs no introduction to <em>aficionados</em> of copyright textbooks, being the author of several such books published by Facet Publishing in the past (and reviewed by <em>Ariadne </em>[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>][<a href="#3">3</a>][<a href="#4">4</a>][<a href="#5">5</a>]).&nbsp; His latest effort, <em>The E-copyright Handbook</em>, attempts to cover the fast-moving and complex world of electronic copyright, using an interesting approach.&nbsp; Rather than the traditional way of such books, describing the media and describing the rights granted to copyright owners, the way the law applies to each media type, exceptions to copyright and so on, his approach is a mixture but with some emphasis on activities, as a glance at the chapter titles shows: Introduction, Content Types, Activities, Copyright Exceptions, Licences, the Digital Economy Act, Enforcement and The Hargreaves Review.&nbsp;</p> <p>It is a complex approach, which requires careful cross-referencing and also checking that material is neither duplicated, nor that is anything is overlooked.&nbsp; It is not clear to me whether the book is meant for reading through, or whether it should be just dipped into when a particular issue causes someone to check the law; but I found the approach confusing.&nbsp;</p> <p>The book also suffers from being in a fast-moving area, where the law, and technology, change fast and although it is clear that Facet got the book published in record time, as there are numerous references to 2012 developments in the text, the work is already out of date in several places, and will no doubt get more out of date as the months go on.&nbsp; Another problem is that the book cannot make up its mind whether it is written for UK readers, or readers in the EU, or in the USA.&nbsp; All too often, different countries’ court cases are mentioned together; one is (say) a UK case and another is a US case.&nbsp; Without the understanding that US law and UK law in this field are very different, people will come to incorrect conclusions about the significance of the cases to them in their day to day work. Moreover, all too often the cases are described without any court decisions relating to them being provided; so one is left with the worry ‘why did the author mention this case at all?’</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review charles oppenheim bbc de montfort university google jisc loughborough university university of strathclyde bibliographic data bibliometrics cloud computing copyright data database dissemination google books open access research standards streaming url web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:30:54 +0000 lisrw 2415 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Redeveloping the Loughborough Online Reading List System http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author1">Jon Knight</a>, <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author2">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author3">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the redevelopment of Loughborough University’s open source reading list system.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Loughborough Online Reading Lists System (LORLS) [<a href="#1">1</a>] has been developed at Loughborough University since the late 1990s.&nbsp; LORLS was originally implemented at the request of the University’s Learning and Teaching Committee simply to make reading lists available online to students.&nbsp; The Library staff immediately saw the benefit of such a system in not only allowing students ready access to academics’ reading lists but also in having such access themselves. This was because a significant number of academics were bypassing the library when generating and distributing lists to their students who were then in turn surprised when the library did not have the recommended books either in stock or in sufficient numbers to meet demand.</p> <p>The first version of the system produced by the Library Systems Team was part of a project that also had a ‘reading lists amnesty’ in which academics were encouraged to provide their reading lists to the library which then employed some temporary staff over the summer to enter them into the new system.&nbsp; This meant that the first version of LORLS went live in July 2000 with a reasonable percentage of lists already in place.&nbsp; Subsequently the creation and editing of reading lists was made the responsibility of the academics or departmental admin staff, with some assistance from library staff.</p> <p>LORLS was written in Perl, with a MySQL database back-end.&nbsp; Most user interfaces were delivered via the web, with a limited number of back-end scripts that helped the systems staff maintain the system and alert library staff to changes that had been made to reading lists.</p> <p>Soon after the first version of LORLS went live at Loughborough, a number of other universities expressed an interest in using or modifying the system. Permission was granted by the University to release it as open source under the General Public Licence (GPL)[<a href="#2">2</a>].&nbsp; New versions were released as the system was developed and bugs were fixed. The last version of the original LORLS code base/data design was version 5, which was downloaded by sites worldwide.</p> <h2 id="Redesign">Redesign</h2> <p>By early 2007 it was decided to take a step back and see if there were things that could be done better in LORLS.&nbsp; Some design decisions made in 1999 no longer made sense eight years later.&nbsp; Indeed some of the database design was predicated on how teaching modules were supposed to work at Loughborough and it had already become clear that the reality of how they were deployed was often quite different.&nbsp; For example, during the original design, the principle was that each module would have a single reading list associated with it.&nbsp; Within a few years several modules had been found that were being taught by two (or more!) academics, all wanting their own independent reading list.</p> <p>Some of the structuring of the data in the MySQL database began to limit how the system could be developed.&nbsp; The University began to plan an organisational restructuring shortly after the redesign of LORLS was commenced, and it was clear that the simple departmental structure was likely to be replaced by a more fluid school and department mix.</p> <p>Library staff were also beginning to request new features that were thus increasingly awkward to implement.&nbsp; Rather than leap through hoops to satisfy them within the framework of the existing system, it made sense to add them into the design process for a full redesign.</p> <p>It was also felt that the pure CGI-driven user interface could do with a revamp.&nbsp; The earlier LORLS user interfaces used only basic HTML forms, with little in the way of client-side scripting.&nbsp; Whilst that meant that they tended to work on any web browser and were pretty accessible, they were also a bit clunky compared to some of the newer dynamic web sites.</p> <p>A distinct separation of the user interface from the back-end database was decided upon to improve localization and portability of the system as earlier versions of LORLS had already shown that many sites took the base code and then customised the user interface parts of the CGI scripts to their own look and feel.&nbsp; The older CGI scripts were a mix of user interaction elements and database access and processing, which made this task a bit more difficult than it really needed to be.</p> <p>Separating the database code from the user interface code would let people easily tinker with one without unduly affecting the other.&nbsp; It would also allow local experimentation with multiple user-interface designs for different user communities or devices.</p> <p>This implied that a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) would need to be defined. As asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX)[<a href="#3">3</a>] interactions had been successful applied in a number of recent projects the team had worked on, XML was chosen as the format to be used.&nbsp; At first simple object access protocol (SOAP) style XML requests was experimented with, as well as XML responses, but it was soon realised that SOAP was far too heavy-weight for most of the API calls, so a lighter ‘RESTful’ API was selected.&nbsp; The API was formed of CGI scripts that took normal parameters as input and returned XML documents for the client to parse and display.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper jon knight google harvard university loughborough university microsoft gnu access control ajax api archives authentication bibliographic data blog cache chrome cookie data database digital library e-learning framework google books gpl html javascript jquery json library management systems licence metadata moodle mysql open source perl refworks restful schema shibboleth soap software sql standards web browser xml z39.50 zip Sat, 28 Jul 2012 14:32:55 +0000 lisrw 2354 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk IMPACT Final Conference 2011 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/impact-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/impact-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the two-day conference looking at the results of the IMPACT Project in making digitisation and OCR better, faster and cheaper.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The IMPACT Project (<strong>Imp</strong>roving <strong>Ac</strong>cess to <strong>T</strong>ext) [<a href="#1">1</a>] was funded by the European Commission back in 2007 to look at significantly advancing access to historical text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) methods. As the project reaches its conclusion, one of its key objectives is sharing project outputs.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/impact-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report marieke guy abbyy austrian national library bnf brightsolid british library california digital library content conversion specialists d-lib magazine dcc google ibm institute for dutch lexicology national and university library of slovenia national library of finland national library of the netherlands stanford university tufts university ukoln university of bath university of munich university of oxford university of salford university of utrecht ahlib europeana impact project archives blog copyright data data management data mining data set database digital library digitisation dissemination finereader framework google books ict information retrieval information society interoperability metadata mets national library ocr oer open source optical character recognition preservation research search technology software solr tagging tesseract twitter unicode wiki wordpress Sun, 26 Feb 2012 13:36:33 +0000 lisrw 2233 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Europeana Open Culture 2010 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author1">David Fuegi</a> and <a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author2">Monika Segbert-Elbert</a> report on the annual Europeana Conference, held at the Westergasfabriek in Amsterdam in October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Europeana Conference is a free annual event which highlights current challenges for libraries, museums, archives and audio-visual archives and which looks for practical solutions for the future. It connects the main actors in cultural and scientific heritage in order to build networks and establish future collaborations. The Europeana Open Culture 2010 Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was the third annual conference and the biggest so far. It focused on how the cultural institutions can create public value by making digital, cultural and scientific information openly available.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report david fuegi monika elbert bbc british museum google europeana wikipedia aggregation archives authentication blog copyright creative commons data database digital library digitisation dissemination flickr framework geospatial data gis google books information society intellectual property linked data metadata open access open data open source portal provenance semantic web standards video web 2.0 Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1594 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Trove: Innovation in Access to Information in Australia http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/holley#author1">Rose Holley</a> describes a major development in the Australian national digital information infrastructure.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In late 2009 the National Library of Australia released version 1 of Trove [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the public. Trove is a free search engine. It searches across a large aggregation of Australian content. The treasure is over 90 million items from over 1000 libraries, museums, archives and other organisations which can be found at the click of a button. Finding information just got easier for many Australians. Exploring a wealth of resources and digital content like never before, including full-text books, journals and newspaper articles, images, music, sound, video, maps, Web sites, diaries, letters, archives, people and organisations has been an exciting adventure for users and the service has been heavily used. Finding and retrieving instantly information in context; interacting with content and social engagement are core features of the service. This article describes Trove features, usage, content building, and its applications for contributors and users in the national context.</p> <h2 id="Opportunities_for_Libraries">Opportunities for Libraries</h2> <p>I see tremendous opportunities for libraries this year because of advances in technology. The changes in technology mean that anyone can create, describe or recommend content, which means that many people and organisations are becoming librarians or libraries in their own way. Librarians should not be threatened or dismayed by this but rather encouraged, since it means that society is retaining its ongoing interest in the creation, organisation and dissemination of content, and we have an integral role to play in these developments. Libraries and librarians are relevant more than ever in this environment because we have vast amounts of data and information to share, a huge amount of information expertise, and an understanding of how technology can assist us in making information more accessible.</p> <p>We need to have new ideas and re-examine our old ideas to see how technology can help us. What things have we always wanted to do that we couldn't before, like providing a single point of access to all Australian information? Is this still pie in the sky or can we now achieve it? Libraries need to think big. As Charles Leadbeater would say 'Libraries need to think they are leading a mass movement, not just serving a clientele.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] Librarians are often thought of as gatekeepers with the emphasis being on closed access, but technology enables gatekeepers to open doors as well as close them and this is the opportunity I see. However many institutions will need to change their strategic thinking from control/shut to free/open before they can make this transition, and take a large dose of courage as well. The American author Harriet Rubin says, 'Freedom is actually a bigger game than power. Power is about what you can control. Freedom is about what you can unleash.' [<a href="#3">3</a>] The National Library of Australia already took this step forward in 2008 with the advent of the Australian Newspapers beta service, which opened up the raw text of digitised Australian newspapers to the public for improvement, without moderation on a mass scale [<a href="#4">4</a>]. With a long history of collaboration across the Australian cultural heritage sector [<a href="#5">5</a>] with regard to digitisation, storage, and service delivery, the National Library of Australia is well placed to take the lead with innovation in access to information.</p> <p>Some people may say, 'But isn't Google doing that, so why do we still need libraries?' There is no question in my mind that libraries are fundamentally different from Google and other similar services. Libraries are different to Google for these reasons: they commit to provide long-term preservation, curation and access to their content; they have no commercial motives in the provision of information (deemed by various library acts); they aim for universal access to everyone in society; and they are 'free for all'. To summarise: libraries are always and forever. Who can say that of a search engine, or of any commercial organisation, regardless of size?</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article rose holley amazon british library google national library of australia oai open library wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data bibliographic database browser copyright curation data database digitisation dissemination doc dublin core facebook flickr ftp google books identifier infrastructure lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh ocr open archives initiative persistent identifier preservation research resource sharing rss search technology tagging twitter usability video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1563 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries (emtacl10) http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/emtacl10-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/emtacl10-rpt#author1">Andrew Walsh</a> reports on a new international conference on emerging technologies within academic libraries organised by the library of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and held in Trondheim, Norway in April 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/emtacl10-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report andrew walsh amazon google heriot-watt university oclc talis university of huddersfield university of nottingham journaltocs api blog browser cataloguing cloud computing data database facebook google books google docs google scholar infrastructure internet explorer library management systems linked data mashup mobile mp4 open data portal repositories research rss search technology semantic web sms social networks software video web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1576 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Turning on the Lights for the User: NISO Discovery to Delivery Forum http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/niso-d2d-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/niso-d2d-rpt#author1">Laura Akerman</a> and <a href="/issue63/niso-d2d-rpt#author2">Kim Durante</a> report on Discovery to Delivery, Creating a First-Class User Experience, a NISO Forum on today's information seekers and current standards developments held in March 2010 at the Georgia Tech Global Learning Center.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/niso-d2d-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report kim durante laura akerman amazon blackboard coalition for networked information cornell university emory university georgia institute of technology google library of congress niso oai oclc serials solutions internet archive wikipedia aggregation api application profile archives atom authentication cataloguing data database digital library digitisation drm dublin core ebook framework google books google scholar identifier interoperability jstor knowledge base marc metadata oai-pmh onix open archives initiative openurl qr code research resource sharing rss schema search technology sfx shibboleth software standardisation standards tagging video visualisation xml Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1548 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Ajax in Oracle JDeveloper http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/cliff-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/cliff-rvw#author1">Pete Cliff</a> finds aspects of this work useful and interesting, but he also expresses some serious reservations.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Asynchronous Javascript and XML (AJAX) programming technique enables one to update parts of a Web site without reloading the entire page. So useful is it that AJAX is turning up all over the Web, including on my own Web-based archival interfaces; so it was timely that I should be asked to review <em>Ajax in Oracle JDeveloper</em>.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/cliff-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 review pete cliff google oracle university of oxford ajax apache api atom cd-rom database framework google books java javascript operating system php rss software windows xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1518 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk An Awfully Big Adventure: Strathclyde's Digital Library Plan http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/law <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue58/law#author1">Derek Law</a> describes how the University of Strathclyde is choosing to give priority to e-content and services instead of a new building.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>By Scottish standards, Strathclyde is a new university, being a mere two hundred years old. It is a large university with 20,000 students, some forty departments covering most disciplines other than medicine and a huge programme of continuing professional development (CPD). Set up as 'a place of useful learning' it has always specialised in the applied disciplines – business, engineering, professional training (teachers, lawyers and social workers) and has set out to be quite different from its better-known competitors.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/law" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue58 feature article derek law google university college london university of strathclyde archives blog born digital cataloguing copyright data digital asset management digital library digitisation ebook ejournal google books institutional repository marc rae repositories research search technology software wiki Fri, 30 Jan 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1454 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk e-Books for the Future: Here but Hiding? http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/whalley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue49/whalley#author1">Brian Whalley</a> outlines some developments in e-book technologies and links them to existing ways of presenting textbook information.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/whalley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue49 feature article brian whalley bbc cetis google hewlett-packard jisc massachusetts institute of technology queens university of belfast eboni jorum ples project gutenberg wikipedia wikisource aggregation archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing copyright creative commons data database digital asset management digital library digital repositories dspace e-learning ebook ejournal exif file format flash google books higher education hypertext internet explorer interoperability itunes learning objects licence mac os metadata mobile mp3 multimedia open source podcast portal rae repositories research rss scorm search technology software sql standards syndication thesaurus vle widget wiki wireless youtube Mon, 30 Oct 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1271 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Introducing UnAPI http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/chudnov-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/chudnov-et-al#author1">Dan Chudnov</a> and a team of colleagues describe unAPI, a tiny HTTP API for serving information objects in next-generation Web applications.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Common Web tools and techniques cannot easily manipulate library resources. While photo sharing, link logging, and Web logging sites make it easy to use and reuse content, barriers still exist that limit the reuse of library resources within new Web services. [<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>] To support the reuse of library information in Web 2.0-style services, we need to allow many types of applications to connect with our information resources more easily. One such connection is a universal method to copy any resource of interest.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/chudnov-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 feature article dan chudnov ed summers jeremy frumkin michael j. giarlo mike rylander peter binkley ross singer amazon andrew w mellon foundation ansi ciac d-lib magazine georgia institute of technology google library of congress microsoft mpeg national science foundation niso oai oregon state university university of alberta university of washington yale university apache api archives atom bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing data database didl digital library dublin core fedora commons firefox flickr foaf framework google books html identifier interoperability javascript json library management systems metadata microformats mods namespace oai-pmh opac open archives initiative openurl php plain text rdf repositories rfc rss ruby schema search technology software sru srw standards syndication uri url web 2.0 web app web browser web services wiki wordpress xml xslt z39.50 z39.88 Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1248 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk JISC/CNI Conference, York 2006 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/jisc-cni-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/jisc-cni-rpt#author1">Najla Semple</a> and <a href="/issue48/jisc-cni-rpt#author2">Robin Rice</a> were at the JISC / CNI conference 'Envisioning future challenges in networked information'.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Encapsulating the events of such an information-rich event as the JISC / CNI conference can be a tricky task, but the next few lines will, we hope, deliver a flavour of the occasion as well as a summary of a few significant themes.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/jisc-cni-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 event report najla semple robin rice cni cornell university digital preservation coalition edina google jisc library of congress ukoln university college london university of edinburgh university of virginia wellcome trust didet jisc information environment content management copyright data data model data set digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation e-science eprints fedora commons google books google search higher education ict infrastructure interoperability jstor licence metadata open access open source portal preservation provenance repositories research resource discovery search technology software vle web 2.0 Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1258 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk