Overview of content related to 'passwords' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/1246/0?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Realising the Potential of Altmetrics within Institutions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/liu-adie <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/liu-adie#author1">Jean Liu</a> and <a href="/issue72/liu-adie#author2">Euan Adie</a> of Altmetric take a look at the growing presence of altmetrics in universities, and consider some of the potential applications.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The concept of alternative metrics as indicators of non-traditional forms of research impact – better known as ‘altmetrics’ – has been gaining significant attention and support from both the scholarly publishing and academic communities. After being adopted by many publishing platforms and institutional repositories within the past year, altmetrics have entered into the scholarly mainstream, emerging as a relevant topic for academic consideration amidst mounting opposition to misuse of the Journal Impact Factor.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/liu-adie" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article euan adie jean liu altmetric llp carnegie mellon university indiana university london school of economics university of bath university of glasgow adobe aggregation altmetrics article-level metrics blog data data set digitisation doi identifier metadata open access passwords repositories research twitter url web services Wed, 29 Jan 2014 20:21:26 +0000 lisrw 2500 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developing a Prototype Library WebApp for Mobile Devices http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author1">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author2">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the development of a prototype WebApp to improve access to Library systems at Loughborough University for mobile devices.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Reviewing Loughborough University Library’s Web site statistics over a 12-month period (October 2011 – September 2012) showed a monthly average of 1,200 visits via mobile devices (eg smart phones and tablet computers). These visits account for 4% of the total monthly average visits; but plotting the percentage of visits per month from such mobile devices demonstrated over the period a steady increase, rising from 2% to 8%.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper apple google loughborough university w3c adobe ajax android apache api authentication blog browser cache cataloguing content management cookie css data framework google books html html5 ipad iphone itunes java javascript jquery json library management systems local storage metadata mobile native app native apps open source passwords perl restful rss standards tablet computer url vocabularies web app web browser web development widget xhtml xml Mon, 10 Jun 2013 13:33:09 +0000 admin 2438 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Wellcome Library, Digital http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author1">Christy Henshaw</a> and <a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author2">Robert Kiley</a> describe how the Wellcome Library has transformed its information systems to support mass digitisation of historic collections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online access is now the norm for many spheres of discovery and learning. What benefits bricks-and-mortar libraries have to offer in this digital age is a subject of much debate and concern, and will continue to be so as learning resources and environments shift ever more from the physical to the virtual. In order to maintain a place in this dual environment, most research libraries strive to replicate their traditional offerings in the digital world.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article christy henshaw robert kiley jisc wellcome library wellcome trust algorithm api archives authentication bibliographic data blog born digital cache cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data database digital archive digital asset management digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation facebook flash framework html html5 information architecture infrastructure javascript jpeg jpeg 2000 json library management systems licence metadata mets mobile passwords portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology standards twitter url usability video web browser xml schema Tue, 18 Jun 2013 14:52:03 +0000 lisrw 2449 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk DataFinder: A Research Data Catalogue for Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rumsey-jefferies <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/rumsey-jefferies#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> and <a href="/issue71/rumsey-jefferies#author2">Neil Jefferies</a> explain the context and the decisions guiding the development of DataFinder, a data catalogue for the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 2012 the University of Oxford Research Committee endorsed a university ‘Policy on the management of research data and records’ [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Much of the infrastructure to support this policy is being developed under the Jisc-funded Damaro Project [<a href="#2">2</a>]. The nascent services that underpin the University’s RDM (research data management) infrastructure have been divided into four themes:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rumsey-jefferies" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article neil jefferies sally rumsey bodleian libraries datacite jisc orcid uk data archive university of oxford dmponline impact project aggregation algorithm api archives cataloguing controlled vocabularies curation data data citation data management data model data set database digital archive digital library eprints fedora commons identifier infrastructure jacs linked data metadata oai-pmh open access open archives initiative passwords preservation purl rdf repositories research research information management schema search technology semantic web software solr standards uri url vocabularies wireframe xml Thu, 13 Jun 2013 20:23:22 +0000 lisrw 2446 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Motivations for the Development of a Web Resource Synchronisation Framework http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author1">Stuart Lewis</a>, <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author2">Richard Jones</a> and <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author3">Simeon Warner</a> explain some of the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article describes the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework. The Framework addresses the need to synchronise resources between Web sites. &nbsp;Resources cover a wide spectrum of types, such as metadata, digital objects, Web pages, or data files. &nbsp;There are many scenarios in which the ability to perform some form of synchronisation is required. Examples include aggregators such as Europeana that want to harvest and aggregate collections of resources, or preservation services that wish to archive Web sites as they change.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 tooled up richard jones simeon warner stuart lewis aberystwyth university cornell university imperial college london jisc library of congress niso oai oclc ukoln university of edinburgh university of oxford dbpedia europeana opendoar wikipedia access control aggregation api archives atom cache cataloguing data data management data set database digital library doi dspace dublin core eprints framework ftp higher education html hypertext identifier interoperability knowledge base linked data metadata namespace national library oai-ore oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source passwords portal portfolio preservation provenance repositories research rfc rss search technology service oriented architecture software sru srw standards sword protocol syndication twitter uri url web app web resources web services xml z39.50 Mon, 03 Dec 2012 15:58:46 +0000 lisrw 2392 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk SUSHI: Delivering Major Benefits to JUSP http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/meehan-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author1">Paul Meehan</a>, <a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author2">Paul Needham</a> and <a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author3">Ross MacIntyre</a> explain the enormous time and cost benefits in using SUSHI to support rapid gathering of journal usage reports into the JUSP service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>A full-scale implementation of the Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) would not be possible without the automated data harvesting afforded by the Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol. Estimated time savings in excess of 97% compared with manual file handling have allowed JUSP to expand its service to more than 35 publishers and 140 institutions by September 2012. An in-house SUSHI server also allows libraries to download quality-checked data from many publishers via JUSP, removing the need to visit numerous Web sites. The protocol thus affords enormous cost and time benefits for the centralised JUSP service and for all participating institutions. JUSP has also worked closely with many publishers to develop and implement SUSHI services, pioneering work to benefit both the publishers and the UK HE community.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-meehan-et-al/jusp-logo.png" style="width: 145px; height: 133px;" title="Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP)" /></p> <h2 id="JUSP:_Background_to_the_Service">JUSP: Background to the Service</h2> <p>The management of journal usage statistics can be an onerous task at the best of times. The introduction of the COUNTER [<a href="#1">1</a>] Code of Practice in 2002 was a major step forward, allowing libraries to collect consistent, audited statistics from publishers. By July 2012, 125 publishers offered the JR1 report, providing the number of successful full-text downloads. In the decade since COUNTER reports became available, analysis of the reports has become increasingly important, with library managers, staff and administrators increasingly forced to examine journal usage to inform and rationalise purchasing and renewal decisions.</p> <p>In 2004, JISC Collections commissioned a report [<a href="#2">2</a>] which concluded that there was a definite demand for a usage statistics portal for the UK HE community; with some sites subscribing to more than 100 publishers, just keeping track of access details and downloading reports was becoming a significant task in itself, much less analysing the figures therein. There followed a report into the feasibility of establishing a ‘Usage Statistics Service’ carried out by Key Perspectives Limited and in 2008 JISC issued an ITT (Invitation To Tender). By early 2009 a prototype service, known as the Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) had been developed by a consortium including Evidence Base at Birmingham City University, Cranfield University, JISC Collections and Mimas at The University of Manchester; the prototype featured a handful of publishers and three institutions. However, despite a centralised service appearing feasible [<a href="#3">3</a>], the requirement to download and process data in spreadsheet format, and the attendant time taken, still precluded a full-scale implementation across UK HE.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="COUNTER" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-meehan-et-al/counter-header.png" style="width: 640px; height: 45px;" title="COUNTER" /></p> <p>Release 3 of the COUNTER Code of Practice in 2009 however mandated the use of the newly-introduced Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol [<a href="#4">4</a>], a mechanism for the machine-to-machine transfer of COUNTER-compliant reports; this produced dramatic efficiencies of time and cost in the gathering of data from publishers. The JUSP team began work to implement SUSHI for a range of publishers and expanded the number of institutions. By September 2012, the service had grown significantly, whilst remaining free at point of use, and encompassed 148 participating institutions, and 35 publishers. To date more than 100 million individual points of data have been collected by JUSP, all via SUSHI, a scale that would have been impossible without such a mechanism in place or without massive additional staff costs.</p> <p>JUSP offers much more than basic access to publisher statistics, however; the JUSP Web site [<a href="#5">5</a>] details the numerous reports and analytical tools on offer, together with detailed user guides and support materials. The cornerstone of the service though is undeniably its SUSHI implementation, both in terms of gathering the COUNTER JR1 and JR1a data and - as developed more recently - its own SUSHI server, enabling institutions to re-harvest data into their own library management tools for local analysis.</p> <h2 id="JUSP_Approach_to_SUSHI_Development_and_Implementation">JUSP Approach to SUSHI Development and Implementation</h2> <p>Once the decision was made to scale JUSP into a full service, the development of SUSHI capability became of paramount importance. The team had been able to handle spreadsheets of data on a small scale, but the expected upscale to 100+ institutions and multiple publishers within a short time frame meant that this would very quickly become unmanageable and costly in staff time and effort - constraints that were proving to be a source of worry at many institutions too: while some sites could employ staff whose role revolved around usage stats gathering and analysis, this was not possible at every institution, nor especially straightforward for institutions juggling dozens, if not hundreds, of publisher agreements and deals.</p> <p>Two main issues were immediately apparent in the development of the SUSHI software. Firstly, there was a lack of any standard SUSHI client software that we could use or adapt, and, more worryingly, the lack of SUSHI support at a number of major publishers. While many publishers use an external company or platform such as Atypon, MetaPress or HighWire to collect and provide usage statistics, others had made little or no progress in implementing SUSHI support by late 2009 - where SUSHI servers were in place these were often untested or unused by consumers.</p> <p>An ultimate aim for JUSP was to develop a single piece of software that would seamlessly interact with any available SUSHI repository and download data for checking and loading into JUSP. However, the only client software available by 2009 was written and designed to work in the Windows environment, or used Java, which can be very complex to work with and of which the JUSP team had limited expertise. The challenge therefore became to develop a much simpler set of code using Perl and/or PHP, common and simple programming languages which were much more familiar to the JUSP team.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/meehan-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article paul meehan paul needham ross macintyre birmingham city university cranfield university elsevier intute jisc jisc collections mimas niso university of manchester university of oxford jusp nesli pirus2 zetoc archives authentication csv data data set database digital library dublin core html identifier interoperability java multimedia openurl passwords perl php portal raptor repositories research shibboleth software standards sushi windows xml Wed, 05 Dec 2012 17:54:19 +0000 lisrw 2396 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Case Studies in Web Sustainability http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/turner <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/turner#author1">Scott Turner</a> describes issues around making Web resources sustainable.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>At the moment organisations often make significant investments in producing Web-based material, often funded through public money, for example from JISC. But what happens when some of those organisations are closed or there&nbsp; is no longer any money or resources to host the site? We are seeing cuts in funding or changes in governmental policy, which is resulting in the closure of some of these organisations.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/turner" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article scott turner amazon google jisc university of northampton amazon web services archives blog cloud computing css geospatial data google analytics google docs html infrastructure internet explorer mac os passwords research search engine optimisation search technology standards twitter url web resources web services youtube Mon, 10 Dec 2012 15:09:03 +0000 lisrw 2405 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Collaboration and Interaction in a Post-graduate Research Programme http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for post-graduate students where RefShare is deployed for digital storage and retrieval, alongside Blackboard for the purposes of communication. She also describes the role of the information specialist in the programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p align="left">The Phytomedicine Programme is a multidisciplinary and collaborative research programme investigating therapeutically useful compounds present in plants growing in South Africa. &nbsp;The programme was started in 1995 and was transferred to the Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria in 2002. In 2007 it was designated as a National Research Foundation Developed Research Niche Area [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article tertia coetsee blackboard elsevier google harvard university ibm ifla university of cambridge university of melbourne university of pretoria archives authentication bibliographic data blackboard learning system blog collection development copyright data data mining database digital preservation dissemination electronic theses facebook ict information society knowledge management mobile learning open access passwords podcast privacy refworks research search technology software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 08:39:58 +0000 lisrw 2350 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Launching a New Community-owned Content Service http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/milloy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/milloy#author1">Caren Milloy</a> describes some of the challenges overcome and lessons learned by JISC Collections during the development of JISC eCollections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>JISC eCollections is a set of e-resource platforms launched in November 2011 by JISC Collections, in partnership with the JISC data centres EDINA and Mimas. The platforms (Figure 1) are JISC MediaHub, JISC Historic Books and JISC Journal Archives; together, they are intended to provide a sustainable, value-for-money alternative to accessing licensed content on publisher platforms, by consolidating and hosting the broad range of historical book, journal archive and multimedia content purchased by JISC Collections on behalf of the UK education community. The vision is to provide a world-class collection that ensures users’ broadest information needs are well met, and to work in partnership with the community to improve and develop the platforms around evolving student and researcher expectations.</p> <h2 id="Background">Background</h2> <p>The primary role of JISC Collections is the licensing of content on behalf of its UK Higher Education (HE) and Further Education (FE) member organisations. Over the last 10 years, JISC Collections has invested over £40 million in centralised licensing of digital content, in perpetuity, on behalf of all its members. The first agreement was signed in 2002 for ProQuest’s Early English Books Online (EEBO). Since then, national licences have been negotiated for historic books, journal archives and multimedia content (Figure 1), such as documentaries and educational films. In 2010, JISC Collections invested a further £2.5 million in film and image content, representing UK and world history since 1987, specially selected for teaching and learning. The majority of JISC Collections’ member organisations would be unable to afford per-institution subscriptions to these book, journal and multimedia collections, so centralised licensing is critical to broadening access.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue69-milloy/fig1-jec-platforms.png" style="width: 680px; height: 213px;" title="Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service</strong></p> <h2 id="Why_Develop_JISC_eCollections">Why Develop JISC eCollections?</h2> <p>The platforms contain more than 4.5 million resources from over 20 providers. JISC Collections members were previously required to access this content via a range of separate services, each with different user interfaces and administrative requirements, and with a complex funding set-up including both JISC subsidies and publisher access fees payable by each institution. JISC Collections felt that its existing – and future – investments in content would best be protected and preserved by developing an independent service, as an affordable alternative to relying on content providers for access to perpetually licensed content. Such a service would allow the education community to take ownership of its acquisitions and assure it of future control. In 2011 each group of resources was consolidated into one platform to increase discoverability, simplify the user experience (making it more inclusive to users at all academic levels), reduce the administrative burden, and thereby enable maximum value to be derived from the initial content investments.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/milloy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article caren milloy british library edina google jisc jisc collections middlesex university mimas research information network ubird aggregation archives cataloguing data data mining database ebook further education graphics higher education licence marc metadata multimedia ocr open access optical character recognition passwords portfolio preservation provenance research resource discovery schema search technology Sat, 28 Jul 2012 16:36:05 +0000 lisrw 2356 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Walk-in Access to e-Resources at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author1">Kate Robinson</a>, <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author2">Lizz Jennings</a> and <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author3">Laurence Lockton</a> outline a low-cost solution to walk-in (visitor) access to licensed e-journals, drawing on their practice at the University of Bath with a wiki ERM and OPAC terminals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Although the move from print to electronic journals over the last two decades has been enormously beneficial to academic libraries and their users, the shift from owning material outright to renting access has restricted the autonomy of librarians to grant access to these journals.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>Licence restrictions imposed by publishers define and limit access rights and librarians have increasingly taken on the role of restricting access on behalf of the publisher, rather than granting access on behalf of their institution.&nbsp; In other words, librarians and their institutions are no longer free to decide who may read this material as they no longer own it.&nbsp;</p> <p>This situation has been the subject of negotiation for some time, and it is fair to say that an accommodation has been reached in many cases through less restrictive licensing terms.&nbsp; Some clearer definition of groups who can use e-journals has eased the situation for 'authorised users', such as those teaching students of an institution who are not directly employed by the institution itself, for example, through franchised courses.&nbsp; However, there is still a group of potential users who do not have a relationship with an institution other than a wish to access the Library's holdings to further their research or their curiosity.&nbsp; In the past, such access was at the discretion of the Librarian but with regard to e-journals it is now set out in publishers’ licences, usually under the terms of 'walk-in access' to these resources.&nbsp; This in itself is a positive move and seemingly restores some access control to the Librarian.&nbsp; In practice, however, it has not proved to be straightforward to implement.</p> <p>In general terms e-journal access, although via the Web, piggybacks on established University IT systems and safeguards which have not always been specifically designed to support the licence restrictions of publishers.&nbsp; The definition of an authorised user for walk-in access is usually one who has been granted access to the Library building.&nbsp; This requirement for e-journal material to be restricted to the actual library building, not just University premises, presents a technical challenge.&nbsp; It is not reasonable to expect a University's IT infrastructure to be redesigned to accommodate the needs of those who are not part of the institution.&nbsp; However, there is a balance to be struck as a tipping point has been reached, with journal holdings become increasingly e-only and widening participation becoming increasingly important to institutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>There are a growing number of groups who would like would and benefit from walk-in access.&nbsp;&nbsp; In recent years requests for access to e-journals have become more frequent from library users, such as researchers who already use and borrow hard-copy materials through the SCONUL Access scheme, and school/college students undertaking Extended Project or International Baccalaureate qualifications.&nbsp; Clearly it is desirable to support the research community of which we are part, and to encourage EP/IB students whose next steps may well be into Higher Education.&nbsp; Visits for school/college groups are increasingly encouraged at institutional level and often include teaching and other intensive support from library staff; support which increases as the range of material they are authorised to access decreases.&nbsp; Research areas and subjects for these pieces of work are diverse and cannot be easily satisfied through textbook material or residual hard-copy journal holdings.&nbsp; In this climate, we need to look again at how to implement walk-in access to open up resources wherever possible.&nbsp; To do this we first need to take two steps: to identify which online material we can allow access to and to facilitate access through a route which meets licence terms, that is, to this material only within the library building.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up kate robinson laurence lockton lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university sconul ucisa university of bath access control accessibility authentication browser cataloguing collection development data database dublin core ejournal firefox higher education infrastructure institutional repository intranet ldap library management systems licence opac open source opera operating system passwords research resource discovery resource management smartphone solaris url usability web browser wiki windows Fri, 27 Jul 2012 19:10:21 +0000 lisrw 2349 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Turning Off Tap Into Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/chapman <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/chapman#author1">Ann Chapman</a> describes the lifecycle of a demonstrator database and the development of a preservation policy for its content and software.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/chapman" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article ann chapman british library jisc mla ukoln university of bath application profile archives cataloguing collection description data database digitisation dublin core dvd lcsh metadata mysql open source passwords preservation research resource discovery resource management rslp schema search technology software url Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1604 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Never Waste a Good Crisis: Innovation and Technology in Institutions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/cetis-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/cetis-2010-rpt#author1">Tore Hoel</a> reports on the CETIS 2010 Conference, 15 - 16 November 2010 at the National College for Leadership of Schools and Childrens' Services Conference Centre, Nottingham.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'I get a feeling that we are on a...' [The hands make a gesture to show the stern of a sinking ship].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/cetis-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report tore hoel cetis iso jisc massachusetts institute of technology national university of ireland oslo university college university of bristol university of nottingham university of southampton e-framework wikipedia archimate blog cloud computing creative commons data e-learning facebook framework higher education ict identifier linked data lod machine learning mashup metadata mobile oer open data open source passwords rdf rdfa research search technology semantic web social software sparql standardisation standards uri wiki windows Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1612 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Don't You Know Who I Am? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paschoud <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/paschoud#author1">John Paschoud</a> looks into identity and access management in the pre-digital and digital age, and describes how the JISC Identity Management Toolkit can help us manage identities better.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Way back in prehistory, when libraries were buildings with books in, identity management was a pretty simple challenge for them. A library was either truly 'public', in which case you did not care who came in (the more people, the more popular you were, which was 'a good thing'). Otherwise, you had to be a member, and the security officer on the door knew your face, or you could show him (it was usually a 'him', then) a card or something to prove you were a member.</p> <p>For a library to trust you to take some of its books away with you (without hiding them under your coat), you usually did have to be a member, and becoming a member entailed some sort of registration process in which you might have to prove who you were with some official-looking document. The details of each member could be recorded in some sort of register, and a card issued. Effectively taking someone's membership away again, for whatever reason, was a bit more difficult - unless there was an opportunity to wrest the precious library card from them physically!</p> <h2 id="Admissions_Rules">Admissions Rules</h2> <p>A few years ago now our Projects Team at the London School of Economics (LSE) Library [<a href="#1">1</a>] was involved in documenting and analysing the admissions rules of academic libraries in London. This was before our own library agreed to provide full access to 'the general public' (in return for Heritage Lottery grants towards a £20m building project), but I was intrigued to find that our own admissions rules included all sorts of bipartite agreements with institutions such as Kings College London (proximity, I guess) and the School of Oriental and African Studies (a lot of common-interest post-colonial subject material in each of our collections).</p> <p>The most interesting 'right of access' I found in our admissions rules was 'accredited diplomatic staff of a recognised foreign country, attached to an embassy, consulate or diplomatic mission in London'. I never actually observed anyone trying to exercise this particular right (I am excused counter duties at the library because I do not know enough about books), but I was aware that my colleagues who did serve on the Admissions Desk rota were a wonderfully diverse lot; with collectively far more knowledge of international and political affairs than this duty required. I imagined the possible scene of an intending visitor from some small state (in some dispute with the United Nations, perhaps) being rebuffed by one of our Library Assistants because he was not accredited by a <em>recognised</em> foreign country. I am sure all our LAs are much too diplomatic themselves for anything like that to actually happen now; but it did get me thinking.</p> <p>What we also discovered in the course of the same investigation was the great number of other academic libraries to which I was allowed admission, on the strength of my status as a staff member at LSE. We decided to test this out with a small 'mystery shopper' exercise. Having retrieved a copy of the access rules for South Bank University Library (with, listed somewhere on page 2, the clause allowing LSE staff members reciprocal access) I duly set off on the 171 bus, armed with the plastic card that identified me as such (with the usual un-fetching photo and the magnetic strip that magically opened the turnstile at the LSE Library when I came into the office every morning). There were two serious flaws in this plan. The first was due to the fact that single-sided photocopying was clearly the norm at South Bank, and the otherwise very polite security officer at the Perry Library was only in possession of page 1 of their admissions rules, and so he couldn't see a reason to let me in. I would like to believe that the second flaw was a result of my personal fame in the library world; but it was really because quite a lot of librarians tend to circulate around jobs in London universities, and a former LSE Library colleague was currently managing the counters there, recognised me and told the officer to let me in. The project team decided that I would need some serious disguises before being allowed out to do any more mystery shopping!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paschoud" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article john paschoud british library cardiff university jisc kings college london london school of economics school of oriental and african studies sconul south bank university ucisa university college london university of bristol es-loa identity management toolkit identity project access control archives cataloguing data data management foi graphics higher education infrastructure passwords research rfid search technology shibboleth wiki Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1542 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intranet Management: Divine Comedy or Strategic Imperative? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/white#author1">Martin White</a> suggests that a failure to recognise the value of intranets is a symptom of a failure to recognise information as a strategic asset.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>According to Dante in his Divine Comedy the inscription above the door to Hades reads "Abandon hope all ye who enter here". For many this could also be the sign on the home page of their organisation's intranet as, with business-critical decisions to make, they begin the daily hunt for information that they are sure should be somewhere in the application. It could just as easily be the sign on the door of the intranet manager of the organisation, though this door usually also carries a number of other job descriptions, all of which seem to be given more priority by the organisation than the care and development of the intranet. Most organisations of any size will have a full-time web manager, often with a support team, but this is rarely the case with the intranet.</p> <p>There are a substantial number of intranets in the UK. Statistics from the Office for National Statistics indicate that 22% of all businesses have an intranet [<a href="#1">1</a>]. As the size of the business increases so does the level of penetration, and most businesses of more than 500 people will now have some form of intranet. Given the number of businesses in the UK the author estimates that there are probably around 300,000 intranets in the commercial sector, and at a guess a further 100,000 in the public sector, charities, Higher Education institutions (HEIs) and other organisations. Only over the last few years has any reliable statistical information become available on intranet use and development, and this is a in-depth global survey of only around 300 intranets [<a href="#2">2</a>]. In the UK HEI sector a major opportunity was lost in a survey commissioned in 2009 by Eduserv into the management of web content in the HEI sector as no account of intranet use of CMS applications was included in the scope of the survey [<a href="#3">3</a>]. A survey of SharePoint use in HEIs undertaken for Eduserv in late 2009 [<a href="#4">4</a>] did indicate that a number of institutions were using SharePoint for intranet applications but the survey did not look in detail at intranet implementation.</p> <p>It is also only over the last few years have forums been set up in which intranet managers are able to share experiences and challenges with others. The work of the Intranet Benchmark Forum [<a href="#5">5</a>] is focused on providing services to large organisations, but there are also other virtual and physical discussion forums, such as the Intranet Forum [<a href="#6">6</a>] run by UKeiG for its members. It is probably reasonable to suggest that the majority of intranet managers have seen very few intranets from which to gain a sense of good practice, whereas web managers have an almost unlimited supply of sites from which to gain ideas for their own use. This is as true in the HEI sector as in other sectors. Given the installed base of intranets in the UK it is also surprising that there is no 'intranet conference' event even though intranet management does feature in events such as Online Information [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Most countries in northern Europe have an intranet conference [<a href="#8">8</a>], often with several hundred delegates, so why there is no equivalent in the UK is a mystery.</p> <h2 id="Intranets_Are_Different">Intranets Are Different</h2> <p>All too often an intranet is regarded as an internal web site. The reality is that about the only commonality between an intranet and a web site is the use of web browser technology. Many very successful intranets do not even use a web content management application but instead are based on Notes technology or portal applications. Intranet content contribution is usually highly distributed, with individual members of staff publishing content direct to the intranet perhaps only a few times a year. This means that the web content management system has to be highly intuitive, and enable Word documents to be rendered into clean HTML code to create web pages. The teams supporting public web sites are using the systems every working day, working often in HTML and having a much more limited range of content to cope with. Many of the problems that arise in keeping content current on an intranet are a result of staff having to use a complex Web publishing system that was specified for Web site management and not intranet management.</p> <p>Another factor to be considered is that increasingly intranets are federated applications [<a href="#9">9</a>]. This is often the situation in HEIs where each department wants to have its own intranet, and on top of all these individual intranets there is some form of top-level 'corporate' home page and navigation. Often there is no central coordination of these intranets, and so each adopts some or none of the visual design standards of the HEI.</p> <p>As far as enterprise applications are concerned, intranets are different because they are not based on business processes or work-flow. Finance, registry, personnel and most other applications support well-defined processes, usually within a specific department, and where the content requirements are usually specified in database terms. Anything approaching text content is usually relegated to a single field in the database. Intranets exist because there is a substantial amount of information in any organisation that is not based on business processes and cannot be managed within a formal database structure, such as policies, procedures, campus maps, events, staff notices and hundreds of other information formats produced by every department and location within the organisation.</p> <p>As a result the intranet becomes an information dumping ground. Under-resourced intranet managers do not have the resources to maintain content quality, and so multiple versions of documents with no visible ownership or provenance proliferate. Employees leave or change responsibility but the intranet is based on a 'file-and-forget' principle and no effort is taken to ensure that document ownership is transferred to another member of staff. Very quickly the information architecture of the intranet, based usually on the structure of the organisation at the time of the last WCMS (Web content management system) deployment, is not fit for purpose. The decision is taken to implement a search engine, and only then does the scale of the problem of information decay become apparent. It can also be an interesting exercise to search for 'Confidential' and see just how many documents are returned!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article martin white eduserv google harvard university ibm intranet focus ltd jisc microsoft open university university of sheffield adobe blog content management creative commons data database dissemination document management drupal foi higher education html ict information architecture intellectual property intranet knowledge management licence metadata mobile open source passwords portal privacy provenance repositories research rss schema search technology sharepoint standards taxonomy usability web 2.0 web browser wiki Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1530 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Collecting Evidence in a Web 2.0 Context http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/chapman-russell <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/chapman-russell#author1">Ann Chapman</a> and <a href="/issue60/chapman-russell#author2">Rosemary Russell</a> describe the challenge of collecting evidence for a study of how Web 2.0 is being used in the UK HE sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/chapman-russell" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article ann chapman rosemary russell google jisc ukoln university of bath citeulike good apis jorum sharegeo wikipedia archives blog cataloguing data database facebook flickr geospatial data gis google scholar google search higher education librarything mashup netvibes pageflakes passwords podcast repositories research rss search technology second life social networks software standards twitter video vle web 2.0 web app web development wiki wordpress youtube Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1488 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2009: Evolution Or Revolution: The Future of Identity and Access Management for Research http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/eduserv-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/eduserv-2009-rpt#author1">Shirley Williams</a> reports on the Eduserv Foundation Symposium which took as its theme investigate the intersection between identity management, access management and scholarly research collaboration across institutional and geographic boundaries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/eduserv-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 event report shirley williams eduserv jisc london school of economics national e-science centre science and technology facilities council university of glasgow university of reading access control authentication blog data e-research e-science facebook flickr mobile passwords research shibboleth streaming twitter video wireless Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1500 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk To VRE Or Not to VRE?: Do South African Malaria Researchers Need a Virtual Research Environment? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer#author1">Heila Pienaar</a> and <a href="/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer#author2">Martie van Deventer</a> identify the requirements of a Virtual Research Environment (VRE) for malaria researchers in South Africa.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 4: 200906051150 to accommodate final table correction and fuller conclusion; awaitng ref 12 content-REW --><!-- version 4: 200906051150 to accommodate final table correction and fuller conclusion; awaitng ref 12 content-REW --><p>Worldwide, the research paradigm is in the process of expanding into eResearch and open scholarship. This implies new ways of collaboration, dissemination and reuse of research results, specifically via the Web. Developing countries are also able to exploit the opportunity to make their knowledge output more widely known and accessible and to co-operate in research partnerships.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article heila pienaar martie van deventer british library google jisc microsoft university of oxford university of pretoria bvreh ibvre mrc myexperiment algorithm blog browser curation data data management data set database dissemination document management e-learning e-research e-science framework google scholar graphics identifier infrastructure intellectual property java knowledge management ms word open source passwords portal portfolio repositories research search technology social networks software video virtual research environment web 2.0 wiki Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1469 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Copyright Angst, Lust for Prestige and Cost Control: What Institutions Can Do to Ease Open Access http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/waaijers-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/waaijers-et-al#author1">Leo Waaijers</a> writes about copyright, prestige and cost control in the world of open access while in two appendices Bas Savenije and Michel Wesseling compare the costs of open access publishing and subscriptions/licences for their respective institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 3 to accept 3 post-edits from author 2008-11-06 rew --><!-- version 3 to accept 3 post-edits from author 2008-11-06 rew --><p>The view that the results of publicly financed research should also be publicly accessible enjoys broad support in the academic community. Where their own articles are concerned, however, many authors hesitate to circulate them openly, for example by publishing them in Open Access journals or placing them in their institution's repository. They ask themselves whether that will not be at odds with the copyright rules and whether they will gain – or perhaps even lose – prestige.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/waaijers-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article leo waaijers michel wesseling dest elsevier google jisc lund university sherpa stm university of nottingham university of utrecht repec romeo wikipedia accessibility aggregation algorithm archives copyright database digitisation dissemination google scholar higher education licence metadata open access passwords repositories research sfx software standards Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1429 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Get Tooled Up: Staying Connected: Technologies Supporting Remote Workers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/guy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Having considered organisational issues in her previous article, <a href="/issue57/guy#author1">Marieke Guy</a> takes a look at the many technologies that support remote working, from broadband to Web 2.0 social networking tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/guy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article marieke guy bbc google jisc microsoft ukoln university of aberdeen university of bath university of london internet archive powr wikipedia adobe archives authentication blog browser data database dissemination e-learning eportfolio facebook flickr google docs higher education infrastructure jabber microblogging mobile mobile phone mp3 multimedia operating system passwords podcast portfolio preservation remote working repositories research search technology smartphone social networks software standards streaming twitter usability video videoconferencing web 2.0 web app web development web resources wiki windows wireless wordpress youtube Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Integrating Journal Back Files Into an Existing Electronic Environment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/cooper <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/cooper#author1">Jason Cooper</a> describes how Loughborough University Library integrated a number of collections of journal back files into their existing electronic environment.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/cooper" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 feature article jason cooper jisc jisc collections loughborough university archives browser cataloguing data database dspace dublin core institutional repository library management systems licence marc metadata moodle open source openurl passwords perl repositories schema search technology sfx url xml xml schema z39.50 Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1407 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Custom-built Search Engines http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue55/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> reviews a means of enhancing the relevance of search results through the use of custom-built search engines.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 feature article phil bradley google microsoft blog cloud computing data database google search html pageflakes passwords search technology tag cloud url web 2.0 windows Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1384 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk SWORD: Simple Web-service Offering Repository Deposit http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/allinson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/allinson-et-al#author1">Julie Allinson</a>, <a href="/issue54/allinson-et-al#author2">Sebastien Francois</a> and <a href="/issue54/allinson-et-al#author3">Stuart Lewis</a> describe the JISC-funded SWORD Project which has produced a lightweight protocol for repository deposit.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/allinson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 feature article julie allinson sebastien francois stuart lewis aberystwyth university cetis jisc microsoft oai oclc open knowledge initiative ukoln university of bath university of southampton university of york jisc information environment repositories research team sword project apache api application profile archives atom authentication blog data data set digital library dissemination dspace eprints facebook fedora commons gif interoperability java jpeg ldap learning objects licence metadata mets namespace oai-ore open access open archives initiative open source osid passwords perl php preservation repositories rfc scholarly works application profile search technology software sru standards sword protocol syndication tagging url web app web resources web services wiki xml zip Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1366 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Exploiting the Potential of Blogs and Social Networks http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/social-networking-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/social-networking-rpt#author1">Gill Ferrell</a> reports on a one-day workshop about Blogs and Social Networks, held in Birmingham in November 2007.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/social-networking-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 event report gill ferrell blackboard cardiff university edge hill university eduserv jisc jisc infonet northumbria university oclc ucisa ukoln university of bath university of birmingham university of leeds university of oxford avatar blog data digital media facebook flickr open source passwords portal portfolio privacy research second life social networks software streaming sword protocol twitter video web 2.0 wiki youtube Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1374 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="UkeiG_Course:_Information_Law_for_Information_Professionals"><a name="events1"></a>UkeiG Course: Information Law for Information Professionals</h2> <p><a href="http://www.ukeig.org.uk/training/2008/February/InformationLawforInformationProfessionals.html">Information Law for Information Professionals</a>:<br /><strong>What you need to know about Copyright, Data Protection, Freedom of Information and Accessibility and Disability Discrimination Laws</strong></p> <p>CILIP, 7 Ridgmount Street, London, WC1E 7AE<br />19 February 2008, 9.30-16.30</p> <p>Course outline</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 news and events richard waller alt alt-c british library cilip cni dcc digital preservation coalition goettingen state and university library google imperial college london jisc kings college london library of congress massachusetts institute of technology mla national library of wales national science foundation nhs niso oais portico research information network smithsonian institution tasi ukoln university of nottingham university of oxford university of southampton es-loa identity project jisc information environment wikipedia accessibility aggregation application profile archives authentication bibliographic control bibliographic data biometrics blog born digital cataloguing copyright curation data data management dcmi digital curation digital library digital preservation dissemination dspace dublin core dublin core metadata initiative e-learning e-research e-science eprints fedora commons foi framework frbr higher education hypertext identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects metadata multimedia national library ontologies open access passwords photoshop preservation rdf repositories research resource description and access rss search technology semantic web skos software standards tagging vocabularies web 2.0 wiki Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1377 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Access to Scientific Knowledge for Sustainable Development: Options for Developing Countries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/kirsop-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue52/kirsop-et-al#author1">Barbara Kirsop</a>, <a href="/issue52/kirsop-et-al#author2">Leslie Chan</a> and <a href="/issue52/kirsop-et-al#author3">Subbiah Arunachalam</a> consider the impact of donor access and open access to research publications on the sustainable development of science in developing countries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/kirsop-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 feature article barbara kirsop leslie chan subbiah arunachalam eifl elsevier ept fao google jisc microsoft oai sherpa university of southampton wellcome trust agora romeo accessibility archives authentication data data mining database digital archive digital repositories document management e-science framework free software google scholar infrastructure intellectual property interoperability metadata mobile oai-pmh open access open archives initiative passwords repositories research search technology semantic web software standards tagging Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1327 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Cambridge History of Libraries in Britain and Ireland http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/maccoll-dempsey-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue52/maccoll-dempsey-rvw#author1">John MacColl</a> reviews the first two volumes of this very substantial three-part work, covering the periods to 1640 and 1640-1850.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Cambridge University Press has, with the first two volumes of its three-volume history of libraries in Britain and Ireland, provided a wealth of fascinating information on the development of libraries and librarianship from a sterling collection of historians and scholar librarians. The publication of an edited history results in a denser packing of detail than would be achieved by a work of single authorship, since so many specialists each have an abundance of knowledge to cram into their relatively small allocations of space.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/maccoll-dempsey-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 review john maccoll university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of oxford internet archive worldcat archives cataloguing curation database digital curation digital library passwords repositories research Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1343 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 51: Democratising Cultural Heritage http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne 51.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Having emerged from the political arguments of the 1990s about what culture could be funded and whether it was better to fund soccer or opera, we have moved into an age where, in the UK at least, there are arguments as to what actually constitutes British culture. Fortunately more people are deciding to do culture for themselves than remain passive witnesses to the pundits' debate. The place where they are doing it is online and they are not waiting to see whether their offering attracts the experts' approval - and sometimes, admittedly, one might argue more's the pity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 editorial richard waller jisc microsoft ukoln university of leeds w3c citeulike preserv accessibility authentication bibliographic data bibliographic database blog copyright database e-learning e-research framework html information architecture infrastructure openid opera passwords portal provenance repositories research rss search technology software uri video virtual research environment web 2.0 youtube Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1304 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Supporting Creativity in Networked Environments: The COINE Project http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/brophy-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/brophy-et-al#author1">Geoff Butters</a>, <a href="/issue51/brophy-et-al#author2">Amanda Hulme</a> and <a href="/issue51/brophy-et-al#author3">Peter Brophy</a> describe an approach to enabling a wide range of users to create and share their own stories, thus contributing to the development of cultural heritage at the local level.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/brophy-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 feature article amanda hulme geoff butters peter brophy bbc cerlim jisc manchester metropolitan university the national archives accessibility archives copyright data database digitisation graphics information society infrastructure interoperability mac os metadata passwords preservation provenance research schema search technology thesaurus url usability video youtube Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1305 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The W3C Technical Architecture Group http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/thompson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/thompson#author1">Henry S. Thompson</a> introduces the W3C Technical Architecture Group and its work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/thompson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 feature article henry s. thompson google ibm ietf massachusetts institute of technology oasis sun microsystems university of cambridge university of edinburgh w3c archives cataloguing doi html identifier metadata namespace passwords rdf research schema search technology semantic web sgml uri urn xhtml xml xml schema Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1306 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk OpenID: Decentralised Single Sign-on for the Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/powell-recordon <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/powell-recordon#author1">Andy Powell</a> and <a href="/issue51/powell-recordon#author2">David Recordon</a> take a brief look at OpenID and ask what relevance it has to e-learning.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/powell-recordon" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 feature article andy powell david recordon becta eduserv jisc microsoft verisign ples wikipedia authentication blog browser e-learning firefox foaf framework hcard infrastructure microformats openid passwords php python research ruby shibboleth social networks standards technorati url wayf web 2.0 wiki wordpress zend framework zip Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1314 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Digital Libraries - Integrating Content and Systems http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/awre-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue50/awre-rvw#author1">Chris Awre</a> finds a useful toolset to guide librarians and LIS students on the future use of IT to deliver their services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We are not short of information on digital libraries and the technologies involved in building them. There have been multiple papers in many journals, of which <em>Ariadne</em> itself is key, many books and, now, many blogs enthusiastically informing us of the technical directions it is best to take. Nevertheless the constant evolution of available technologies, makes book publishing in the field a tricky business, risking irrelevance prior to release.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/awre-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 review chris awre serials solutions university of hull authentication blog data digital asset management digital library infrastructure library management systems metadata openurl passwords portal repositories resource management rss sru web services xhtml Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1300 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Preserving Electronic Scholarly Journals: Portico http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/fenton <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue47/fenton#author1">Eileen Fenton</a> outlines issues relating to the long-term preservation of digital resources and the characteristics of an archival entity responding to this need.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The work of academics - in teaching and research - is not possible without reliable access to the accumulated scholarship of the past. As scholars have become more dependent upon the convenience and enhanced accessibility of electronic scholarly resources, concern about the long-term preservation and future accessibility of the electronic portion of the scholarly record has grown. One recent survey found that 83% of academic staff surveyed believe it is 'very important' to preserve electronic scholarly resources for future use [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/fenton" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 feature article eileen fenton american library association andrew w mellon foundation arl association of research libraries coalition for networked information cornell university elsevier library of congress national academy of sciences new york university oclc oxford university press portico university of chicago university of oxford york university accessibility archives authentication data digital library digital preservation digital repositories dtd ejournal graphics higher education infrastructure jstor licence national library passwords preservation repositories research software Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1228 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Improving DSpace@OSU With a Usability Study of the ET/D Submission Process http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/boock <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue45/boock#author1">Michael Boock</a> discusses the ease and usefulness of conducting a usability study and provides an example of usability testing at Oregon State University undertaken to improve the DSpace ET/D submission process.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Can a student find relevant research articles from your library Web pages efficiently? Do faculty effortlessly locate the full text of articles from a licensed database? You can answer these questions and dozens more by conducting a usability study. It can be as simple and painless as gathering students in a room together, asking them to do something and analysing their behaviour.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/boock" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue45 tooled up michael boock oregon state university accessibility authentication browser database dspace electronic theses licence metadata passwords research software url usability Sat, 29 Oct 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1194 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Disaster Management for Libraries and Archives http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/lovecy-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue44/lovecy-rvw#author1">Ian Lovecy</a> looks at a useful consolidation of approaches to disaster management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The aim of this book is ambitious: it sets out to present current professional and practical ideas on the whole range of disaster management, from the precautions which will prevent - or at least minimise - disaster, through the financial considerations, balancing of risk, and staff training needs, to the process of recovery and re-establishment of a service. It does so in an international context; and it does so based on the practical experience of the contributors.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/lovecy-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue44 review ian lovecy british library university of wales archives bibliographic data national library passwords research Fri, 29 Jul 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1181 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Installing Shibboleth http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/mcleish <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue43/mcleish#author1">Simon McLeish</a> describes the experience of Shibboleth installation in a Higher Education environment, and suggests ways to make this experience more user-friendly.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="What_and_Why_Is_Shibboleth">What and Why Is Shibboleth?</h2> <p>One of the major issues that faces all today's Internet users is identity management: how to prove to a Web site that you are who you claim you are, and do so securely enough to prevent someone else being able to convince the Web site that they are you. There are many initiatives attacking the problem, with approaches both technical and legal.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/mcleish" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 tooled up simon mcleish edina eduserv google london school of economics microsoft mimas perseus sdss access control apache archives authentication cookie data fedora commons higher education infrastructure institutional repository ldap licence linux metadata open source passwords portal repositories research saml schema search technology shibboleth software standards tomcat wiki windows xml Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1148 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Focus: Using Collaborative Technologies When on the Road http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/web-focus <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue43/web-focus#author1">Brian Kelly</a> argues that since conference delegates now expect to be able to read email on the road, there are additional technologies which might enhance our effectiveness when away from the office.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In today's networked environment conference delegates expect to be able to access their email when attending events away from their normal place of work. It is increasingly the norm to be given a guest username and password which can be used in PC areas, primarily to access email and the Web. However such facilities are not always flexible enough to support the changed working environment in which conference delegates may find themselves, such as being out-of-sync with local working hours during a conference on the other side of the globe.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/web-focus" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 tooled up brian kelly microsoft ucisa ukoln university of bath blog browser instant messaging interoperability microsoft office mobile mobile phone passwords privacy software web browser wiki Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1149 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk EuroCAMP 2005 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/eurocamp-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue43/eurocamp-rpt#author1">Masha Garibyan</a> and <a href="/issue43/eurocamp-rpt#author2">Ann Borda</a> report on the first Campus Architecture Middleware Planning workshop in Europe hosted by the Politecnico di Torino.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The rapid expansion of the Web and Internet in recent years has brought many benefits. It has never been easier to access scholarly information from anywhere in the world in real time. However, this information is often held in disparate systems and is protected by a variety of access control mechanisms, such as usernames and passwords. Many users have to struggle with increasingly complicated access control systems in order to access information they require. This is especially the case in Higher and Further Education.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/eurocamp-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 event report ann borda masha garibyan eduserv jisc london school of economics microsoft oasis stanford university university of kent perseus access control authentication data digital identity e-research further education higher education identifier infrastructure interoperability jstor ldap metadata open source passwords portal preservation privacy repositories research saml schema shibboleth software xacml Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1150 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 10th CETIS-TechDis Accessibility Special Interest Group Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/acc-sig-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue43/acc-sig-rpt#author1">Ann Chapman</a> reports on a one-day meeting that focused among other things on accessibility in virtual learning environments and personal learning profiles.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Having recently joined the CETIS-TechDis Accessibility SIG (Special Interest Group), I attended the 10th meeting of the group in York on 16 March 2005. The meeting was held in the very new (opened that week) Higher Education Academy Building on the University of York campus where TechDis now has its offices. There was in interesting mix of digital artists, metadata officers, lecturers, project staff and programmers from both universities and colleges, along with people from Becta, JORUM and Key2Access Ltd.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/acc-sig-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 event report ann chapman becta cerlim cetis ibm ims loughborough university manchester metropolitan university rnib staffordshire university ukoln university of wales university of york w3c jorum accessibility data e-learning flash higher education html java metadata mobile passwords perl software usability usb vle Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1153 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h3 id="Netskills_Workshops_in_May_2005">Netskills Workshops in May 2005</h3> <p>Web: <a href="http://www.netskills.ac.uk/">http://www.netskills.ac.uk/</a></p> <p>Netskills will be running the following workshops at North Herts College in Letchworth Garden City in May 2005:</p> <h4 id="May_:_e-Assessment:_Tools_and_Techniques">10 May : e-Assessment: Tools &amp; Techniques</h4> <p>Focuses on the tools available for creating e-assessment and the practical techniques required to use them effectively. The tools are considered both in terms of their functionality as well as their interoperability with other systems.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 news and events richard waller ahds andrew w mellon foundation bbc british library cerlim cetis cilip cni coalition for networked information cornell university d-lib magazine dcc digital preservation coalition eduserv ibm ieee jisc kings college london mla niso nottingham trent university oclc talis the national archives university college london university of cambridge university of glasgow university of plymouth university of strathclyde university of virginia university of warwick w3c digital preservation training programme elisa jisc information environment accessibility aggregation algorithm application profile archives authentication bibliographic data copyright curation data data management data mining data visualisation database digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dissemination dspace dublin core e-business e-government e-learning fedora commons framework further education higher education ict identifier intellectual property interoperability knowledge management learning object metadata learning objects licence lom machine learning managed learning environment metadata mobile modelling multimedia network service ontologies open access open source passwords persistent identifier personalisation portfolio preservation privacy rdf repositories research resource description resource discovery rss search technology semantic web service oriented architecture software standardisation standards usability video visualisation vle vocabularies web services xml Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1154 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Looking for a Google Box? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue42/rahtz <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue42/rahtz#author1">Sebastian Rahtz</a> gives us his evaluation of the Google Search Appliance.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most Web sites of any size want to offer a facility to perform a free-text search of their content. While we all at least <em>claim</em> to believe in the possibilities of the semantic web, and take care over our navigation aids and sitemaps, we know that sooner or later our readers want to type 'hedgehog' into a search box. Yes, even <a href="http://www.microsoft.com">http://www.microsoft.com</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] returns plenty of hits if you try this.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue42/rahtz" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue42 tooled up sebastian rahtz google jisc microsoft oss watch oucs university of oxford cache database google search graphics higher education internet explorer intranet licence multimedia open source passwords rtf search technology semantic web software standards stylesheet url xml xslt Sun, 30 Jan 2005 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1121 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk