Overview of content related to 'university of cincinnati' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/15886/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Balancing Stakeholder Needs: Archive 2.0 As Community-centred Design http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/ridolfo-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/ridolfo-et-al#author1">Jim Ridolfo</a>, <a href="/issue63/ridolfo-et-al#author2">William Hart-Davidson</a> and <a href="/issue63/ridolfo-et-al#author3">Michael McLeod</a> present a case example on building a digital archive with cultural and scholarly stakeholder groups - to provide a model for balancing stakeholder needs.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v5. 2010-05-25 revised to accommodate improved images figs 1 & 2 REW --><!-- v5. 2010-05-25 revised to accommodate improved images figs 1 & 2 REW --><p>Archive 2.0 is relatively new concept for us, one that we have only worked with since 2007 and the beginning of our Samaritan Digital Archive Project at Michigan State University (MSU). Our project started with the intention of building a digital archive; the Archive 2.0 nature of the project surfaced when we realised that in order to build a useful archive, we would need to engage multiple stakeholder communities. In our project this meant working with the cultural stakeholders, the Samaritans, as well as academic stakeholders, including Samaritan and Biblical scholars. Initially we thought that applying Web 2.0 technologies such as social networking, image tagging, etc, to a digital archive would be our most important contribution to the project. As the project unfolded and we identified stakeholder needs more precisely however, we realised that our role was as much about balancing stakeholders' representational needs as much as it was about the application of Web 2.0 technologies.</p> <p>The project began in December of 2007 when Writing in Digital Environments (WIDE) Research Center [<a href="#1">1</a>] Research Assistant Jim Ridolfo was browsing the digital MSU Special Collections catalogue, and discovered the library index for the MSU Chamberlain-Warren collection of Samaritan texts. While investigating the history of the collection, Ridolfo learnt that in 2003 a Samaritan elder had travelled to MSU and had spoken to the Board of Trustees. The elder, Binyamim Tsedaka, had 'encouraged the university to utilise the collection to promote Samaritan studies.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] On learning of Tsedaka's speech, Ridolfo e-mailed Tsedaka and enquired about the community's possible interest in collaborating on a digitisation project. Tsedaka responded with his full blessing and an offer of collaboration [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Who_Are_the_Samaritans">Who Are the Samaritans?</h2> <p>The Samaritans have existed as a community for thousands of years. They are an ancient biblical people living primarily in Holon, Israel and Mt. Gerizim, West Bank. Their Torah is similar in content to that of Jewish people, but with several major theological differences. For example, the Samaritan Torah maintains that Mt. Gerizim rather than Jerusalem is holy. The Samaritan Pentateuch also contains thousands of textual differences from the Masoretic Hebrew text; consequently, their theological interpretations and practices differ from common Jewish interpretations and traditions. In addition, the script of the Samaritan Torah is written in Samaritan Hebrew, which includes a unique script, pronunciation scheme, and grammar. Starting at a very early age, all Samaritan children learn to read, write, and chant in Samaritan Hebrew.</p> <p>The Samaritan community includes 712 members, with approximately half the population living in Holon, Israel, and the other half living in the Mt. Gerizim village of Kiryat Luza. The community in Holon speaks Modern Hebrew as a first language, while the community in Kiryat Luza speaks Palestinian Arabic as a first language. The Samaritans living in Kiryat Luza maintain a delicate relationship with the Israeli government and the Palestinian Authority. Being few in number and vulnerable to larger political trends, they seek a peaceful relationship with both authorities. For example, the residents of Kiryat Luza possess both Palestinian Authority and Israeli passports, vote in both elections, and work, travel, and study on both sides of the Green Line. Since the Samaritans of Holon and Kiryat Luza commemorate all festivals, holidays, and life cycle celebrations together on Mt. Gerizim, they are very keen to maintain contact between both communities [<a href="#4">4</a>][<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/ridolfo-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article jim ridolfo michael mcleod william hart-davidson michigan state university university of cincinnati archives cataloguing database digital archive digitisation facebook framework metadata mysql php portal research software tagging usability web 2.0 web portal Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1544 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk