Overview of content related to 'accessibility' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/127/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Editorial Introduction to Issue 71 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/editorial2#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 71.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>As I depart this chair after the preparation of what I thought would be the last issue of <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>], I make no apology for the fact that I did my best to include as much material&nbsp; to her ‘swan song’ as possible. With the instruction to produce only one more issue this year, I felt it was important to publish as much of the content in the pipeline as I could.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 editorial richard waller amazon birmingham city university digital repository federation jisc loughborough university oclc oregon state university ukoln university for the creative arts university of huddersfield university of oxford university of sussex wellcome library jusp kaptur scarlet accessibility agile development api archives augmented reality authentication big data blog bs8878 cataloguing content management controlled vocabularies curation data data management data set database digital library digitisation diigo ebook educational data mining framework google docs higher education html html5 infrastructure jquery learning analytics metadata mets mobile native apps open access open source portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology software solr standardisation standards sushi tagging twitter url video wcag web 2.0 web app widget xml schema Wed, 17 Jul 2013 19:01:02 +0000 lisrw 2493 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Bring Your Own Policy: Why Accessibility Standards Need to Be Contextually Sensitive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kelly-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author1">Brian Kelly</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author2">Jonathan Hassell</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author3">David Sloan</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author4">Dominik Lukeš</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author5">E A Draffan</a> and <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author6">Sarah Lewthwaite</a> argue that rather than having a universal standard for Web accessibility, standardisation of Web accessibility practices and policies needs to be sufficiently flexible to cater for the local context.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Initiatives to enhance Web accessibility have previously focused on the development of guidelines which apply on a global basis. Legislation at national and international levels increasingly mandate conformance with such guidelines. However large scale surveys have demonstrated the failure of such approaches to produce any significant impact.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kelly-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article brian kelly david sloan dominik lukes ea draffan jonathan hassell sarah lewthwaite iso kings college london london metropolitan university oracle ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of southampton w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility agile development blog browser bs8878 cookie data doi e-learning ead framework ict mobile research responsive design social networks software standardisation standards usability video wcag web resources web services web standards youtube Mon, 08 Jul 2013 18:13:42 +0000 lisrw 2475 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Augmented Reality in Education: The SCARLET+ Experience http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author1">Laura Skilton</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author2">Matt Ramirez</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author3">Guyda Armstrong</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author4">Rose Lock</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author5">Jean Vacher</a> and <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author6">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> describe augmented reality in education case studies from the University of Sussex and the University for the Creative Arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p style="margin-left:36.0pt;">&nbsp;Augmented reality, a capability that has been around for decades, is shifting from what was once seen as a gimmick to a bona fide game-changer. [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> </blockquote> <p>Augmented Reality (AR) has been listed in the Horizon Reports, key predictors of the potential impact of new technology on education. The 2011 Report [<a href="#1">1</a>] sparked the idea for an innovative project - SCARLET: Special Collections using Augmented Reality to Enhance Learning and Teaching.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article guyda armstrong jean vacher laura skilton marie-therese gramstadt matt ramirez rose lock alt courtauld institute of art glasgow school of art jisc mimas museum of london university for the creative arts university of london university of manchester university of sussex university of the arts london vads jorum kaptur scarlet accessibility archives augmented reality blog copyright data data set digitisation e-learning firefox framework ftp graphics infrastructure internet explorer ipad mobile multimedia oer portal research search technology smartphone url video web browser windows wireless youtube Tue, 11 Jun 2013 17:38:54 +0000 lisrw 2439 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ECLAP 2013: Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eclap-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the second international conference held by ECLAP, the e-library for performing arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The beautiful city of Porto was the host location for ECLAP 2013 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the 2nd International Conference on Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment. &nbsp;Porto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon and home of the Instituto Politécnico do Porto (IPP), the largest polytechnic in the country, with over 18,500 students.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report marieke guy bbc coventry university dcc microsoft oais ukoln university of leeds university of lisbon w3c europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data blog copyright creative commons data data management digital archive digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dublin core dvd ebook epub foaf framework geospatial data haptics higher education ict internet explorer interoperability knowledge base lod metadata multimedia ontologies open data owl preservation rdf remote working repositories research schema social networks software standards streaming usability video vocabularies Thu, 04 Jul 2013 20:46:57 +0000 lisrw 2471 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Powering Search - The Role of Thesauri in New Information Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/will-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/will-rvw#author1">Leonard Will</a> reviews a comprehensive survey of the literature on the use of thesauri in information search processes and interfaces.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Powering Search</em> is a comprehensive review and synthesis of work that has been done over the past 50 years on the use of thesauri to make searching for information more effective. The book does not discuss the principles and practice of construction of information retrieval thesauri in any detail, but concentrates on the search process and on the user interface through which a searcher interacts with a body of information resources. It is written clearly: each chapter begins and ends with a summary of its content, and the first and last chapters summarise the whole book. There are copious references throughout and a full index.</p> <p>As the author says in his conclusion:</p> <blockquote><p>'This book has taken a new approach to thesauri by critiquing the relevant literatures of a variety of communities who share an interest in thesauri and their functions but who are not, it should be noted, closely collaborating at this time – research communities such as library and information science, information retrieval, knowledge organization, human-computer interaction, information architecture, information search behavior, usability studies, search user interface, metadata-enabled information access, interactive information retrieval, and searcher education.'</p> </blockquote> <p>One consequence of these disparate approaches is that terminology varies across communities: there are many interpretations of the meaning of <em>facet, category, keyword </em>or<em> taxonomy</em>, for example, which the author acknowledges, but he then uses these terms without saying precisely what definition he gives them.</p> <h2 id="Information_Search_Processes">Information Search Processes</h2> <p>Chapters 2 and 3 review studies on how people go about searching for information, leading to the perhaps self-evident conclusion that there are two types of approach. If a specific and well-defined piece of information is sought, people will amend and refine their queries in the light of initial results to get closer to what they seek. On the other hand, if the search requirement is less well defined, a browsing or 'berrypicking' approach is adopted to explore a subject area, picking up and assembling pieces of information and changing the destination as the exploration progresses. Both these approaches use an iterative procedure, within which a thesaurus can serve to make a search more precise, in the first case, or to show the broader context, in the second.</p> <p>Chapter 4 deals with thesauri in Web-based search systems, and gives several examples of thesauri in digital libraries, subject gateways and portals, digital archives and linked data repositories. This is one way of grouping these examples, but it is not clear that there is any distinction in principle between the way thesauri can be used in each of them, or indeed in search interfaces to other types of document collections. The main distinction, which is not fully addressed, is whether the information resources being searched have been indexed with terms from the thesaurus being used, or whether the thesaurus is just a source of possible terms for searching the text, and possibly the metadata, of documents. More weight needs to be given to the statement in the introduction to ISO 25964 -1:</p> <blockquote><p>'If both the indexer and the searcher are guided to choose the same term for the same concept, then relevant documents will be retrieved. This is the main principle underlying thesaurus design ...'</p> </blockquote> <p>In fact the book generally talks about <em>terms</em> rather than the approach taken by the current standards of considering unambiguously defined <em>concepts</em>, with terms just serving as convenient labels for these. Each concept may have many labels by which it can be retrieved, including one chosen as <em>preferred</em> for each language covered by the thesaurus.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/will-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review leonard will ansi cilip iso niso willpower information accessibility controlled vocabularies dewey decimal digital archive digital library graphics information architecture information retrieval interoperability lcsh linked data metadata repositories research search technology standards taxonomy thesaurus url usability visualisation vocabularies Wed, 26 Jun 2013 18:00:00 +0000 lisrw 2451 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 70 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 70.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Issue 70 of <em>Ariadne </em>which is full to the brim with feature articles and a wide range of event reports and book reviews.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 editorial richard waller alt amazon google hefce jisc portico rdwg ukoln university of oxford w3c ark project jisc information environment jusp liparm rdmrose web accessibility initiative wikipedia accessibility aggregation archives bs8878 controlled vocabularies data data management database digital curation digitisation ejournal framework higher education identifier internet explorer jstor licence metadata microsoft reporting services mobile open access perl portal preservation privacy raptor repositories research resource management schema search technology software standardisation standards sushi wcag web resources web services wiki xml xml schema Fri, 14 Dec 2012 14:20:23 +0000 lisrw 2417 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Gold Open Access: Counting the Costs http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/andrew <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/andrew#author1">Theo Andrew</a> presents new data on the cost of Gold OA publishing at the University of Edinburgh.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Research Councils UK (RCUK) have recently announced a significant amendment to their open access (OA) &nbsp;policy which requires all research papers that result from research partly or wholly funded by RCUK to be made open access [<a href="#1">1</a>]. To comply with this policy, researchers must either; a) publish in an open access journal, termed Gold OA, which often incurs an article processing charge (APC); or, b) ensure that a copy of the post-print is deposited in an appropriate repository, also known as Green OA.</p> <p>A subsequent clarification from RCUK stated that Gold OA is the preferred mechanism of choice to realise open access for outputs that they have funded and have announced the award of block grants to eligible institutions to achieve this aim [<a href="#2">2</a>]. Where a Gold OA option is unavailable, Green OA is also acceptable; however, RCUK have indicated that the decision will be ultimately left up to institutions as to which route to take [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p>Since RCUK are the major funder of research in the United Kingdom, this new policy will not only have a major impact on how researchers publish their work, but also huge implications for their budgets. Many research institutions funded by RCUK are currently investigating how they will implement this policy and are looking at the costs for open access publication, and how they can support the adoption of open access within their organisation. The ball is very much in the court of institutions to decide how to play the open access game.</p> <p>One of the key factors that will affect institutions is the cost that publishers will set for their APCs. So far RCUK have steered clear of suggesting an appropriate fee, leaving individual publishers to determine the market level of the APCs as per the current situation. Meanwhile there seems to be a huge variability in costs. There is a general expectation that over time APCs will settle to a reasonable rate and similarly journal subscriptions will lower to reflect the gradual change in business model from subscription fees to APCs. Most publishers have not yet been upfront about what impact they will have on journal subscriptions, if any, and it is hard to access and assess real-life data. RSC Publishing is one notable exception since it has introduced a system of waiving a proportion of APC fees based on institutional subscription costs.</p> <p>Much of this transition period to full open access will have to be navigated through uncharted territory, where no one has a clear handle on the costs involved. The rationale of this article is to present data on article processing charges gathered over the past five years, report on trends seen within this data, to suggest some approaches and to generally contribute to and inform the policy discussion.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>To put some rough-and-ready figures on the table, the University of Edinburgh publishes in the region of 4,000-4,500 peer-reviewed journal articles per year; this figure does not include other publication types like working papers not affected by the RCUK policy. Assuming an average Article Processing Charge (APC) of £1500 [<a href="#4">4</a>], the total publication costs to make all of these outputs Gold would be in the region of £6m. It is clear that even with guaranteed funding from HEFCE, and other funders of research, large research-intensive universities will not be able to pay for all of their research to be published under Gold OA. How to allocate funding to researchers will be a difficult choice that many institutions are currently asking themselves - will it be on a first-come-first-served basis, funder-specific, or will REF-submitted material take priority?</p> <p>Equally problematic are the difficulties we face in fully assessing an institution’s total spend on open access. Whilst it is possible to find out through aggregate sources like Web of Science how many articles are published in fully open access journals. It is virtually impossible to find out the number of open access articles published in hybrid journals as there is currently no flag in the metadata which indicates the open status of the paper. A hybrid journal is a traditional subscription journal that offers open access to individual articles upon payment of an APC. Of course it is possible to find hybrid open access content through EuropePMC.org; however this will only give a snapshot for the biomedical and life sciences. With current systems and processes it is virtually impossible to gauge this spend accurately.</p> <h2 id="Cost_Data">Cost Data</h2> <p>Unfortunately, financial data about open access publishing is scarce. The University of Edinburgh (UoE) has recently implemented account codes to allow the finance systems to track this spend going forwards; however, finding out costs retrospectively remains problematic. Furthermore, institutions are not typically in the habit of publishing this data with others. The institutions that have shared data show a degree of variability. In 2010, the foremost initial supporter and enabler of Gold Open Access publishing in the UK, the Wellcome Trust, found that the&nbsp;average cost of publication under the author-pays model was $2,367 (approximately £1,500) [<a href="#4">4</a>]. RCUK in their recent press release on block grants for open access estimate the average APC as £1,727 plus VAT [<a href="#2">2</a>], whilst, based on figures in the Finch Report, the University of Nottingham paid on average £1,216 [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p>All these figures are useful as they give a ballpark figure upon which further estimates can be based. The precise cost of individual APCs levied by publishers is generally unavailable in a form which easily enables further analysis. Typically this information is available from publisher’s Web sites; however, aggregating the data is cumbersome as there is no consistent way to interrogate the Web sites and APCs commonly vary from title to title in the publishers’ portfolio. There have been some commendable attempts to gather this information, for example the SHERPA RoMEO listing of Publishers with Paid Options for Open Access [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Here about 100 publishers have been surveyed and their APCs are listed. A large cost variance exists for some publishers’ records as individual journals often have different APCs, and also institutional subscriptions/memberships can reduce costs in a non-uniform way. It takes a lot of effort to gather these data and keep them it up to date. Other approaches have tried to crowd-source this activity, for example Ross Mounce’s survey of open access publishers, publications, licences and fees. Here approximately 130 publishers’ web sites were surveyed to find out what licences are being used on the open access content; the cost being a secondary focus of the survey. Analysis of these data shows less than 5% of publishers claiming 'open access' are fully compliant with the Budapest Declaration on Open Access [<a href="#7">7</a>].</p> <p>The data we present here is an attempt to enrich the data available to interested parties and make them available in a reusable format for further analysis. It comprises articles funded by the Wellcome Trust at the University of Edinburgh between 2007 and 2012. In total there are 260 articles published in a mixture of open access journals and traditional subscription journals with an open access option (sometimes known as hybrid). All of the journals charged an article processing fee. Overall, the total cost incurred was £452,713.40. The mean article processing charge was £1,741.21, with the median value £1,644.22. The full data can be accessed online at the Edinburgh DataShare repository [<a href="#8">8</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/andrew" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article theo andrew hefce university of edinburgh university of nottingham wellcome trust datashare sherpa romeo accessibility altmetrics blog creative commons data data management data set digital library licence metadata open access portfolio repositories research Mon, 03 Dec 2012 20:23:29 +0000 lisrw 2393 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 'Does He Take Sugar?': The Risks of Standardising Easy-to-read Language http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/kelly-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author1">Brian Kelly</a>, <a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author2">Dominik Lukeš</a> and <a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author3">Alistair McNaught</a> highlight the risks of attempting to standardise easy-to-read language for online resources.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The idea that if we could only improve how we communicate, there would be less misunderstanding among people is as old as the hills. Historically, this notion has been expressed through things like school reform, spelling reform, publication of communication manuals, etc. The most radical expression of the desire for better understanding is the invention of a whole new artificial language with the intention of providing a universal language for humanity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/kelly-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article alistair mcnaught brian kelly dominik lukes alt alt-c bbc google jisc jisc techdis rdwg ukoln university of bath w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility algorithm blog bs8878 dissemination doi e-learning framework higher education internet explorer multimedia operating system research search technology software standards vocabularies wcag web 2.0 web resources Sat, 15 Dec 2012 15:18:25 +0000 lisrw 2431 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Mining the Archive: The Development of Electronic Journals http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/white#author1">Martin White</a> looks through the <em>Ariadne</em> archive to trace the development of e-journals as a particular aspect of electronic service delivery and highlights material he considers as significant.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>My career has spanned 42 years in the information business. It has encompassed 10,000-hole optical coincidence cards, online database services, videotext, laser discs, and CD-ROMs, the World Wide Web, mobile services and big data solutions. I find the historical development of information resource management absolutely fascinating, yet feel that in general it is poorly documented from an analytical perspective even though there are some excellent archives.</p> <p>These archives include the back issues of <em>Ariadne</em> from January 1996. <em>Ariadne</em> has always been one of my must-reads as a way of keeping in touch with issues and developments in e-delivery of information. The recently launched new <em>Ariadne</em> platform [<a href="#1">1</a>] has provided easier access to these archives. Looking through its content has reminded me of the skills and vision of the UK information profession as it sought to meet emerging user requirements with very limited resources.&nbsp; The archives have always been available on the <em>Ariadne</em> site but the recent update to the site and the availability of good tags on the archive content has made it much easier to mine through the archive issues.</p> <p>The <em>Ariadne</em> team, in particular Richard Waller, has given me the opportunity to mine those archives [<a href="#2">2</a>] and trace some of the developments in electronic service delivery in the UK.</p> <p>Indeed working through the archives is now probably too easy as in the preparation of this column I have found myself moving sideways from many of the feature articles to revel in the other columns that have been a feature of Ariadne. This article is a personal view of some of these developments and is in no way intended to be a definitive account. Its main purpose is to encourage others to look into the archive and learn from the experiences of the many innovators that have patiently coped with the challenges of emerging technology, resource limitations and often a distinct lack of strategy and policy at both an institutional and government level.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-white/image1-optical-coincidence-card.jpg" style="width: 171px; height: 289px;" title="Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970</strong></p> <h2 id="e-Journal_Development">e-Journal Development</h2> <p>Arriving at the University of Southampton in 1967 my main surprise was not the standard of the laboratories but the quality and scale of the Chemistry Department library. School does not prepare you for reading primary journals and how best to make use of Chemical Abstracts, but I quickly found that working in the library was much more fun than in a laboratory. I obtained an excellent result in one vacation project on physical chemistry problems by reverse engineering the problems through Chemical Abstracts! Therefore, as it turned out, I had started my career as an information scientist before I even graduated. By 1977 I was working with The Chemical Society on the micropublishing of journals and taking part in a British Library project on the future of chemical information. &nbsp;Re-reading the outcomes of that project makes me realise how difficult it is to forecast the future. Now my past has re-asserted itself to good effect as I have both the honour and excitement of being Chair of the eContent Committee of the Royal Society of Chemistry.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-white/image2-laserdiscs.jpg" style="width: 336px; height: 312px;" title="Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980</strong></p> <p>So from my standpoint, in seeking to identify distinct themes in the development of information resource management in <em>Ariadne</em>, a good place to start is with the e-markup of chemical journals. In Issue 1 Dr Henry Rzepa wrote about the potential benefits of the semantic markup of primary journals to provide chemists with access to the content of the journal article and not just to a contents page and title [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The immediate problem you face reading this admirable summary of the potential benefits of markup is that many of the hyperlinks have disappeared. History has been technologically terminated. Almost 15 years passed by before the Royal Society of Chemistry set up Project Prospect and turned semantic markup into a production process [4]. Dr Rzepa is now Professor of Computational Chemistry at Imperial College, London.</p> <p>By the mid-1990s good progress had been made in e-journal production technologies and the first e-only journals were beginning to appear. Among them was <em>Glacial Geology and Geomorphology</em> (GGG) which existed in a printed version only in as far as readers could print out a selection from it. One aim of GGG is therefore to provide the benefits of electronic transfer as well as other value added products in an accepted academic, peer-reviewed system. The author of the article describing the project [<a href="#5">5</a>] was Dr. Brian Whalley, who went on to become a Professor in the Geomaterials Research Group, Queens University of Belfast. As you will discover from <a href="../author/brian-whalley-author-profile">his author profile</a> (another <em>Ariadne</em> innovation), Brian is still active though retired from formal education. What struck me about this article was the author’s vision in January 1996 of how e-journals could be of benefit in university teaching.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article martin white andrew w mellon foundation british library hefce imperial college london institute of physics intranet focus ltd jisc mimas portico stm ukoln university of glasgow university of manchester university of sheffield university of southampton jisc information environment accessibility archives big data blog content management copyright database ebook ejournal higher education intellectual property jstor licence mobile open access research resource management search technology standards Thu, 06 Dec 2012 15:50:18 +0000 lisrw 2401 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23rd International CODATA Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk IFLA World Library and Information Congress 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ifla-2012-08-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/ifla-2012-08-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the 78th IFLA General Conference and Assembly held in Helsinki, Finland over 11-17 August 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Sunday newcomers session chaired by <strong>Buhle Mbambo-Thata</strong> provided us with some insight into the sheer magnitude of IFLA (as most people seem to call it) or the World Library and Information Congress (to give the formal name) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. This year’s congress had over 4,200 delegates from 120 different countries, though over a thousand of these were Finnish librarians making the most of the locality of this year’s event.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ifla-2012-08-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy arl association of research libraries cni coalition for networked information dcc google ifla simon fraser university ukoln university of bath university of glasgow university of northampton accessibility aggregation archives chrome cloud computing communications protocol copyright curation data data management data set digital curation digital library digital preservation dublin core facebook framework identifier internet explorer linked data mac os metadata mobile named entity recognition preservation privacy remote working repositories research twitter video Tue, 11 Dec 2012 13:16:31 +0000 lisrw 2407 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: User Studies for Digital Library Development http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/aytac-rvw#author1">Selenay Aytac</a> reviews a collection of essays on user studies and digital library development that provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>User Studies for Digital Library Development</em> provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries. While there are many books on user studies and digital library development, this work operates at the junction of these two domains and stands out for its insights, balance, and quality of its case-based investigations. The book brings together points of view from different professional communities, including practitioners as well as researchers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review selenay aytac bbc glasgow caledonian university library of congress long island university manchester metropolitan university national library of australia university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of malta university of oxford university of sheffield university of strathclyde europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data course design creative commons data digital library digital preservation e-learning framework information society metadata mobile multimedia national library open access research resource discovery usability web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:10:17 +0000 lisrw 2412 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 69 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 69.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Never blessed with any sporting acumen, I have to confess to a degree of ambivalence towards the London Olympics unfolding around this issue as it publishes. That does not mean that I do not wish all the participants well in what after all is an enormous achievement just to be able to compete there at all. While I admit to not watching every team walk and wave, I cannot deny that the beginning and end of the Opening Ceremony [<a href="#1">1</a>] did grab my attention. Who could blame me? I suspect we sat as a nation terrified to discover what this would say about us all.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 editorial richard waller bbc blackboard jisc jisc collections loughborough university ukoln university of bath university of glamorgan university of pretoria devcsi wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives authentication blog cache content management data database digital preservation drupal ebook framework internet explorer json knowledge management licence metadata ocr opac open source perl refworks repositories research schema search technology shibboleth standards usability visualisation wiki xml Tue, 31 Jul 2012 11:45:13 +0000 lisrw 2372 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Walk-in Access to e-Resources at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author1">Kate Robinson</a>, <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author2">Lizz Jennings</a> and <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author3">Laurence Lockton</a> outline a low-cost solution to walk-in (visitor) access to licensed e-journals, drawing on their practice at the University of Bath with a wiki ERM and OPAC terminals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Although the move from print to electronic journals over the last two decades has been enormously beneficial to academic libraries and their users, the shift from owning material outright to renting access has restricted the autonomy of librarians to grant access to these journals.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>Licence restrictions imposed by publishers define and limit access rights and librarians have increasingly taken on the role of restricting access on behalf of the publisher, rather than granting access on behalf of their institution.&nbsp; In other words, librarians and their institutions are no longer free to decide who may read this material as they no longer own it.&nbsp;</p> <p>This situation has been the subject of negotiation for some time, and it is fair to say that an accommodation has been reached in many cases through less restrictive licensing terms.&nbsp; Some clearer definition of groups who can use e-journals has eased the situation for 'authorised users', such as those teaching students of an institution who are not directly employed by the institution itself, for example, through franchised courses.&nbsp; However, there is still a group of potential users who do not have a relationship with an institution other than a wish to access the Library's holdings to further their research or their curiosity.&nbsp; In the past, such access was at the discretion of the Librarian but with regard to e-journals it is now set out in publishers’ licences, usually under the terms of 'walk-in access' to these resources.&nbsp; This in itself is a positive move and seemingly restores some access control to the Librarian.&nbsp; In practice, however, it has not proved to be straightforward to implement.</p> <p>In general terms e-journal access, although via the Web, piggybacks on established University IT systems and safeguards which have not always been specifically designed to support the licence restrictions of publishers.&nbsp; The definition of an authorised user for walk-in access is usually one who has been granted access to the Library building.&nbsp; This requirement for e-journal material to be restricted to the actual library building, not just University premises, presents a technical challenge.&nbsp; It is not reasonable to expect a University's IT infrastructure to be redesigned to accommodate the needs of those who are not part of the institution.&nbsp; However, there is a balance to be struck as a tipping point has been reached, with journal holdings become increasingly e-only and widening participation becoming increasingly important to institutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>There are a growing number of groups who would like would and benefit from walk-in access.&nbsp;&nbsp; In recent years requests for access to e-journals have become more frequent from library users, such as researchers who already use and borrow hard-copy materials through the SCONUL Access scheme, and school/college students undertaking Extended Project or International Baccalaureate qualifications.&nbsp; Clearly it is desirable to support the research community of which we are part, and to encourage EP/IB students whose next steps may well be into Higher Education.&nbsp; Visits for school/college groups are increasingly encouraged at institutional level and often include teaching and other intensive support from library staff; support which increases as the range of material they are authorised to access decreases.&nbsp; Research areas and subjects for these pieces of work are diverse and cannot be easily satisfied through textbook material or residual hard-copy journal holdings.&nbsp; In this climate, we need to look again at how to implement walk-in access to open up resources wherever possible.&nbsp; To do this we first need to take two steps: to identify which online material we can allow access to and to facilitate access through a route which meets licence terms, that is, to this material only within the library building.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up kate robinson laurence lockton lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university sconul ucisa university of bath access control accessibility authentication browser cataloguing data database dublin core ejournal firefox higher education infrastructure institutional repository intranet ldap library management systems licence opac open source opera operating system passwords research resource discovery resource management smartphone solaris url usability web browser wiki windows Fri, 27 Jul 2012 19:10:21 +0000 lisrw 2349 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2012: Big Data, Big Deal? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> attended the annual Eduserv Symposium on 10 May 2012 at the Royal College of Physicians, London to find out what are the implications of big data for Higher Education Institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The annual Eduserv Symposium [<a href="#1">1</a>] was billed as a ‘must-attend event for IT professionals in Higher Education’; the choice of topical subject matter being one of the biggest crowd-drawers (the other being the amazing venue: the Royal College of Physicians). The past few years have seen coverage of highly topical areas such as virtualisation and the cloud, the mobile university and access management.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report marieke guy amazon cetis dcc eduserv google jisc orcid oreilly oxford internet institute ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of california berkeley university of leicester university of oxford webtrends wellcome trust dealing with data impact project accessibility algorithm big data blog cloud computing curation data data management data set database digitisation gis google analytics google trends hadoop higher education infrastructure intellectual property internet explorer irods learning analytics mobile nosql oer open data open source remote working research twitter usb Mon, 30 Jul 2012 17:48:45 +0000 lisrw 2370 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Institutional Web Management Workshop (IWMW) 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/iwmw-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/iwmw-2012-rpt#author1">Kirsty Pitkin</a> reports on the 16th Institutional Web Management Workshop held at the University of Edinburgh's Appleton Tower between 18 - 20 July 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 16th Institutional Web Management Workshop (IWMW 12) took place at the University of Edinburgh's Appleton Tower – a building with a stunning panoramic view over the volcanic city.&nbsp; The event brought together 172 delegates and attracted an additional 165 viewers to the live video stream of the plenary sessions over the three days.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/iwmw-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report kirsty pitkin blackboard cetis dcc edina edinburgh college of art jisc london school of economics nesta open university paper.li robert gordon university university of bradford university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of glamorgan university of southampton university of york devcsi dmponline iwmw jorum accessibility api archives authentication browser bs8878 content management cookie data data management data set data visualisation database foi google refine graphics infrastructure kis licence mobile native apps oer open data open source plone preservation repositories research responsive design search engine optimisation standards storify tagging twitter ukoer url video visualisation wcag web development web services widget xcri-cap Tue, 31 Jul 2012 12:54:44 +0000 lisrw 2373 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Third Annual edUi Conference 2011 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/edui-2011-rpt#author1">Danielle Cooley</a> reports on the third annual edUi Conference, held over 13-14 October 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA, an opportunity for Web professionals in colleges, universities, libraries, museums, etc to discuss the latest developments in Web trends and technologies.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The third annual edUi Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held October 13-14, 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA. The sold-out event saw 225 ‘Web professionals serving colleges, universities, libraries, museums, and beyond’ join together to discuss the latest and greatest in Web trends and technologies. The all-volunteer conference was presented by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, and major sponsors included Microsoft, the University of Richmond, and Virginia Commonwealth University.</p> <p>The two-day event consisted of four tracks [<a href="#2">2</a>]:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report danielle cooley google happy cog kansas state university microsoft university of virginia wikipedia accessibility aggregation android archives blog browser cataloguing css data framework google docs google maps graphics higher education html html5 metadata mis mobile research responsive design search technology twitter usability video web standards widget windows xhtml youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 22:26:07 +0000 lisrw 2241 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 67: Changes Afoot http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 67.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>For readers who might have been wondering, I shall resist Mark Twain's remark about reports of his demise being exaggerated, and reassure you that while <em>Ariadne</em> has been undergoing changes to the way in which it will be delivered to the Web, it has been business as usual in the matter of the content, as you will see from the paragraphs that follow. Issue 67, while currently not looking any different, is in the process of being migrated to a new platform developed to enhance functionality and give a more user-friendly look and feel to the publication.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 editorial richard waller becta jisc jisc techdis meta-net ukoln university of bath university of derby devcsi homer multitext mobile campus assistant mymobilebristol wikipedia accessibility archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing curation data digital library digitisation elluminate eprints framework geospatial data gis identifier infrastructure interoperability librarything metadata mobile natural language processing preservation programming language repositories research rss semantic web software standards tagging twitter uima ulcc urn usability web 2.0 web services webinar Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1618 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk DataCite UK User Group Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on the 2nd UK User Group meeting for DataCite, held at the British Library in London, in April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="top" id="top"></a></p> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>DataCite [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an international not-for-profit organisation dedicated to making research data a normal, citable part of the scientific record. It is made up of a membership of 15 major libraries and data centres, which, along with four associate members, represent 11 different countries across four continents. The approach taken by DataCite currently centres on assigning Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to datasets; it is a member of the International DOI Foundation and one of a handful of DOI registration agencies.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report alex ball badc british library d-lib magazine datacite dcc google mimas orcid science and technology facilities council uk data archive ukoln university of bath university of birmingham university of leicester university of oxford erim fishnet sagecite accessibility api archives bibliographic data cataloguing curation data data set digital curation digital preservation doi framework guid higher education identifier metadata national library open data preservation repositories research schema usability web resources Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1627 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Educational Resources Hack Day http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt#author1">Kirsty Pitkin</a> reports on a two-day practical hack event focusing on Open Educational Resources (OER), held by DevCSI and JISC CETIS in Manchester on 31 March - 1 April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Open Educational Resources Hack Day event was designed to bring together those interested in rapidly developing tools and prototypes to solve problems related to OER. Whilst there is a growing interest in the potential for learning resources created and shared openly by academics and teachers, a number of technical challenges still exist, including resource retrieval, evaluation and reuse. This event aimed to explore some of these problem areas by partnering developers with the creators and users of OER to identify needs and potential solutions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report kirsty pitkin cetis google harper adams university college jisc leeds metropolitan university oai open university ukoln university of bolton university of oxford w3c devcsi jorum oerbital xpert accessibility aggregation api authentication blog browser cataloguing creative commons data data set doi drupal facebook identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects licence linked data metadata mobile moodle oai-pmh oer open source openoffice portal provenance repositories resource sharing rss search engine optimisation search technology software storify sword protocol ukoer url video visualisation vle widget wiki wookie wordpress youtube Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1630 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Characterising and Preserving Digital Repositories: File Format Profiles http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author1">Steve Hitchcock</a> and <a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author2">David Tarrant</a> show how file format profiles, the starting point for preservation plans and actions, can also be used to reveal the fingerprints of emerging types of institutional repositories.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article david tarrant steve hitchcock amazon google harvard university jisc microsoft mpeg the national archives university of illinois university of northampton university of southampton university of the arts london wellcome library jisc information environment keepit wikipedia accessibility adobe archives bibliographic data blog cloud computing css csv curation data data management database digital curation digital preservation digital repositories dissemination document format droid eprints file format flash flash video framework gif graphics html hypertext identifier institutional repository java jpeg latex linked data metadata mpeg-1 open access open source photoshop php plain text preservation quicktime repositories research schema semantic web software standards vector graphics video web 2.0 wiki windows windows media xml xml schema Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1608 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Locating Image Presentation Technology Within Pedagogic Practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> contextualises image presentation technology and methods within a pedagogic framework for the visual arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article marie-therese gramstadt apple blackboard bournemouth university edinburgh college of art google imperial college london jisc jisc digital media microsoft oreilly university for the creative arts university of brighton university of london university of sheffield university of surrey university of the arts london vads pictiva accessibility adobe archives blog browser cataloguing data database digital media e-learning elluminate facebook flash flickr google maps gotomeeting higher education html5 ipad learning design learning objects mac os microsoft office multimedia operating system photoshop podcast portal portfolio research safari screencast software standards usb video vle web 2.0 web resources wiki windows youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1585 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Why UK Further and Higher Education Needs Local Software Developers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/mahey-walk <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/mahey-walk#author1">Mahendra Mahey</a> and <a href="/issue65/mahey-walk#author2">Paul Walk</a> discuss the work of the Developer Community Supporting Innovation (DevCSI) Project which focuses on building capacity for software developers in UK Further and Higher Education to support innovation in the sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Software developers are important to Further (FE) and Higher Education (HE). They are needed to develop and implement local FEI (Further Education Institution) and HEI (Higher Education Institution) solutions, to build e-infrastructure, and to innovate and develop ideas and prototypes that can be exploited by others. They also play an important part in the development and uptake of open standards and interoperability.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/mahey-walk" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article mahendra mahey paul walk bbc google harvard university jisc oracle ukoln university of bath university of london devcsi list8d accessibility blog data digital repositories disruptive innovation eprints further education google docs higher education infrastructure interoperability metadata python rdf rdfa repositories research software ulcc video Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1587 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Researchers across the EResearch Chasm http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wolski-richardson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/wolski-richardson#author1">Malcolm Wolski</a> and <a href="/issue65/wolski-richardson#author2">Joanna Richardson</a> outline an Australian initiative to address technology challenges within current research paradigms.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 1999 Sir John Taylor [<a href="#1">1</a>], then Director General of the UK Research Councils, talked about <em>e-Science</em>, i.e. global collaboration in key areas of science and the next generation of infrastructure that will support it. It encompasses computationally intensive science that is carried out in highly distributed network environments or that uses immense datasets that require grid computing. In the US the term <em>cyberinfrastructure</em> has been used to describe the new research environments that support advanced data acquisition, data storage, data management, data integration, data mining, data visualisation and other computing and information processing services over the Internet. In Australia—and other countries—the term <em>eResearch</em> extends e-Science and cyberinfrastructure to other disciplines, including the humanities and social sciences, and denotes the use of information technology to support existing and new forms of research.</p> <p>It is within this rapidly evolving context that the researcher of the 21st century now operates. However not all researchers are responding to changes in this new environment. In this article we will examine the current research paradigm, the main drivers for researchers to engage with this paradigm, reasons for lack of engagement, and a project undertaken at an Australian university—as part of a national initiative—to start to address the problem of making data from research activity, past and current, more discoverable and accessible.</p> <h2 id="Trends_in_the_Evolution_of_Research_Paradigms">Trends in the Evolution of Research Paradigms</h2> <p>Gray [<a href="#2">2</a>] discusses the evolution of research paradigms which has led to the increasingly important role that information technology now plays in supporting research. For thousands of years there was experimental / empirical science followed in the last few hundred years by theoretical science. The third research paradigm, which evolved in the last few decades, was characterised by increasingly complex research challenges based principally on large-scale computational simulation. This led to the concept of holistic systems of systems; the evolution from wet labs (hands-on scientific research and experimentation) to virtual labs; and an emphasis on modelling, simulation, projection and prediction.</p> <p>E-Science / cyberinfrastructure / eResearch are short-hand terms for a new fourth paradigm which is characterised by data-intensive science. The focus is on data analysis and mining; patterns discovery; and the evolution of large databases and data archives. One by-product is the so-called 'data deluge', which has led to enormous challenges in research data management. The fourth paradigm is changing the longstanding model of scholarly communication as, in the words of Clifford Lynch [<a href="#2">2</a>], 'the paper becomes a window for a scientist to not only actively understand a scientific result, but also reproduce it or extend it'. This latest paradigm is also characterised by the collaborative and multidisciplinary nature of the research being undertaken at both national and international levels.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wolski-richardson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article joanna richardson malcolm wolski cornell university griffith university iso microsoft national library of australia national science foundation oai oclc queensland university of technology accessibility archives content management creative commons data data management data mining data set data visualisation database disruptive innovation dublin core e-research e-science foaf framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata namespace national library oai-pmh ontologies open access open archives initiative open source owl preservation rae rdf repositories research resource description and access semantic web skos software standards visualisation Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1591 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Survive or Thrive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt#author1">Ed Fay</a> reports on a two-day conference organised by UKOLN on behalf of JISC to consider growth and use of digital content on the Web, which was held in Manchester in June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Survive or Thrive [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the punchy title given to an event intended to stimulate serious consideration amongst digital collections practitioners about future directions in our field - opportunities but also potential pitfalls. The event, which focused on content in HE, comes at a time of financial uncertainty when proving value is of increasing importance in the sector and at a point when significant investment has already been made in the UK into content creation, set against a backdrop of increasingly available content on the open Web from a multitude of sources.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report ed fay apple bbc california digital library cerlim edina eduserv google jisc jisc digital media london school of economics massachusetts institute of technology ordnance survey rdtf talis the national archives university of huddersfield accessibility aggregation agile development api archives blog cataloguing data digital curation digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dissemination domain model e-learning flickr geospatial data gis html identifier information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository interoperability itunes javascript linked data mashup metadata mobile personalisation preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology social networks software solr standards tagging text mining twitter usability widget Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1593 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Introductory Concepts in Information Science http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/oppenheim-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/oppenheim-rvw#author1">Charles Oppenheim</a> takes a look at an introduction to Information Science but fails to be impressed.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With a title like that, one would expect a primer, introducing all the key concepts of information science to someone studying the topic for the first time at undergraduate or Masters' level, and possibly for the interested layman. Such a book would be a worthy successor to Chris Hanson's <em>Introduction to Science Information Work</em>, and Roger Meetham's <em>Information Retrieval</em>, both of which were first published about 40 years ago. Sadly, however, this book does not fulfil the promise of its title.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/oppenheim-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review charles oppenheim british library british museum google loughborough university accessibility bibliometrics copyright digital library digital repositories information retrieval open access repositories research resource management software url Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1598 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Web Management Workshop 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt#author1">Keith Doyle</a> provides a personal perspective on a conference organised by UKOLN for those involved in the provision of institutional Web services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This was the 13th Institutional Web Management Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] to be organised by UKOLN [<a href="#2">2</a>] held at the University of Sheffield from 12 to 14 July 2010.&nbsp;The theme was 'The Web in Turbulent Times' [<a href="#3">3</a>]. As such, there was a healthy balance of glass-half-empty-doom-and-gloom, and glass-half-full-yes-we-can.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report keith doyle canterbury christ church university eduserv google ilrt oxford university computing services terminalfour ukoln university college london university of bristol university of cambridge university of oxford university of salford university of sheffield university of the west of england w3c iwmw memento mobile campus assistant wikipedia accessibility apache blog browser cocoa content management css curation data data visualisation datamining facebook firefox framework geospatial data gis hashtag higher education html html5 hypertext information architecture linked data mashup metadata mobile mobile phone opera plone portal qr code rdfa research rss search technology sharepoint smartphone social web software taxonomy twitter usability video videoconferencing visualisation web app web development web services webkit widget wookie wordpress xcri xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1569 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2010: The Mobile University http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt#author1">Shailey Minocha</a> reflects on the one-day symposium organised by Eduserv in May 2010. The aim of the event was to discuss whether and how mobile technology will play a significant role in the delivery of UK Higher Education in the future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report shailey minocha blackboard canterbury christ church university edge hill university eduserv google massachusetts institute of technology open university oucs ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of edinburgh university of oxford university of plymouth university of sheffield university of wolverhampton itunes u accessibility ajax android augmented reality blog browser cataloguing cloud computing data e-learning facebook framework higher education html html5 infrastructure ipad iphone itunes junaio location-based services mobile mobile learning mobile phone open source operating system podcast qr code research search technology smartphone sms social software software twitter url usability video web 2.0 web services webkit wiki wikitude wireless Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1573 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Access, Delivery, Performance - The Future of Libraries Without Walls http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews a Festschrift celebrating the work of Professor Peter Brophy, founder of the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It is normal in some subject disciplines to publish volumes of edited papers in honour of a respected colleague, usually to mark a significant birthday or career change. The contributors to such Festschriften<a href="#editors-note">*</a> are usually made up of former colleagues or pupils of the person being honoured. This volume celebrates the work of Professor Peter Brophy, the founder of the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management (CERLIM), which since 1998 has been based at the Manchester Metropolitan University. This volume contains twelve chapters written by sixteen contributors, many of them colleagues or ex-colleagues of Professor Brophy.</p> <p>Peter Brophy has had an outstanding career both as a librarian and researcher. Alan MacDougall, Visiting Professor at Manchester Metropolitan University provides an outline in the opening chapter. A career that started at the Library Research Unit at Lancaster University in the early 1970s progressed to professional posts at Strathclyde University and Teeside Polytechnic, before Brophy eventually became Librarian at Bristol Polytechnic. From there, he moved to the University of Central Lancashire in 1989, where in 1993 he set up CERLIM. A selected bibliography of works by Professor Brophy fills eleven pages at the end of the volume, revealing the range and diversity of his research interests over the past few decades.</p> <p>The contexts of the early years of Professor Brophy's career are sketched in more detail in the opening chapter by Michael Buckland, Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. Buckland was a colleague of Brophy's at the Library Research Unit at Lancaster in the early 1970s.This chapter gives a good flavour of how library and information research was undertaken in this time when the libraries at what were then 'new universities' had an active interest in innovation and when almost all library research in the UK was funded by the Office for Scientific and Technical Information of the Department of Education and Science.</p> <h2 id="Libraries_and_e-Learning">Libraries and e-Learning</h2> <p>The remainder of the book is organised into four broad themes. The first covers libraries' role in supporting e-learning. The opening chapter in this section is by Gill Needham and Nicky Whitsed of the Open University. It is a series of reflections on a decade of developing library services for distance learners. Starting with the Follett Report of 1993 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the chapter identifies three main phases in the Open University's approach to delivering services to around 200,000 students and 8,000 tutors. The first phase was concerned with fairness; knowing exactly when to introduce online services at a time when a majority of Open University students did not have access to the relevant technologies or skills and when many tutors were reluctant to change their traditional ways of working. Responses to this included the development of library-mediated collections of quality-controlled Internet resources, supplemented by an online skills tutorial focused on generic information skills. Despite all of this, actual use of online resources remained relatively low (p. 30). The second phase, therefore, was mainly about integrating online services more deeply into the core learning activities of courses. The focus switched to the training of tutors and the integration of information resources within the university's emerging virtual learning environment (VLE), based on Moodle. In the interim, a pilot project using the open source MyLibrary software was found to be useful in helping to integrate library services into the learning experiences of individual students. The third phase - which Needham and Whitsed note is still ongoing - concerns the embedding of information literacy and resource-based learning concepts within the university more widely. The chapter ends with some comments on the, perhaps inevitable, tension between the 'invisible library' – 'quietly and strategically … [insinuating] resources and services into all those places where they have the most impact' - and the need to defend library budgets and status within the wider institution (pp. 35-36).</p> <p>The following chapter, by Professor David Baker of the University College Plymouth St Mark and St John, is a general overview of the development of e-learning technologies in UK Higher Education over the past decade. Starting again with Follett, Baker explains how e-learning concepts and technologies have been taken up, focusing in particular on the facilitating role taken by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) in providing a national-level approach to the provision of both infrastructure (e.g., networks, access management tools) and content. In addition, the chapter refers to a number of JISC-funded programmes and initiatives focused on breaking down the barriers that prevent the sharing and re-use of e-learning content. The final sections look at some wider factors influencing the current transformation of learning, teaching and assessment practices. These include the need to integrate institutional services like VLEs with the generic social networking tools and mobile devices familiar to new generations of learners. However, successful integration is not just a matter of technology but of overcoming cultural differences. Baker uses a synthesis of the JISC-funded Learner Experiences of e-Learning projects [<a href="#2">2</a>] to note that there might have been 'an increasing "divide" between the needs, expectations and wishes of the learners and the expectations of the teachers, who were more "traditional" and perhaps not engaged with e-learning in the same way' (p. 49).</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review michael day british library cerlim google jisc manchester metropolitan university mla open university oreilly rnib talis ukoln university of bath university of brighton university of california berkeley university of central lancashire victoria university w3c jisc information environment web accessibility initiative accessibility archives bibliographic data cataloguing controlled vocabularies digital library e-learning facebook flickr framework higher education infrastructure knowledge management metadata mobile moodle open source preservation repositories research semantic web software vle vocabularies wcag web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1580 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Mobilising the Internet Detective http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/massam-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/massam-et-al#author1">Diana Massam</a>, <a href="/issue63/massam-et-al#author2">Andrew Priest</a> and <a href="/issue63/massam-et-al#author3">Caroline Williams</a> describe a recent project to adapt the online Internet Detective tutorial, to deliver a user-friendly mobile site which reflects their market research into user preferences for mobile content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'The mobile phone is undoubtedly [a] strong driving force, a behaviour changer…Library users will soon be demanding that every interaction can take place via the cell phone' [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/massam-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article andrew priest caroline williams diana massam apple google intute jisc mimas ukoln university of manchester w3c devcsi jisc information environment mobile internet detective transcoder accessibility aggregation android blog browser css data e-learning facebook google docs higher education information architecture ipad iphone java linked data mobi mobile mobile learning mobile phone mp3 open source opera php podcast programming language repositories research search technology sms software stylesheet video web development wireless Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1540 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Usability Inspection of Digital Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paterson-low <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/paterson-low#author1">Lorraine Paterson</a> and <a href="/issue63/paterson-low#author2">Boon Low</a> highlight findings from the usability inspection report conducted for the UX2.0 research project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paterson-low" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article boon low lorraine paterson american library association british library iso jisc national e-science centre oreilly university of edinburgh aquabrowser europeana jisc information environment ux2.0 worldcat accessibility ajax cataloguing digital library e-science facebook framework ict interoperability personalisation research resource discovery search technology social networks software standardisation standards tag cloud twitter usability web 2.0 Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1543 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eBooks: Tipping or Vanishing Point? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/tonkin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/tonkin#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> investigates ebooks and takes a look at recent technological and business developments in this area.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Due in large part to the appearance since mid-2006 of increasingly affordable devices making use of e-Ink technology (a monochrome display supporting a high-resolution image despite low battery use, since the screen consumes power only during page refreshes, which in the case of ebooks generally represent page turns), the ebook has gone from a somewhat limited market into a real, although presently still niche, contender. Amazon sold 500,000 Kindles in 2008 [<a href="#1">1</a>]; Sony sold 300,000 of its Reader Digital Book model between October 2006 and October 2009. In September 2009, ebooks represented between 1% and 3% of the total US publishing market [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p>Following the JISC National eBooks Observatory Study [<a href="#3">3</a>] in the UK, one participant, David Nicolas, was quoted as stating that ebooks have 'reached the tipping point' [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Keeping in mind Bohr's statement that, 'prediction is very difficult, especially about the future', it's nonetheless safe to say that publicity about these devices is currently at a high point. But for ebook readers, as Figure 1 shows, this is not their first time in the spotlight.</p> <blockquote><p>"A good book has no ending. ~R.D. Cumming"</p></blockquote> <p>This article marks the third time that <em>Ariadne</em> has discussed the subject of ebooks, namely "Ebooks in UK Libraries: Where are we now?" [<a href="#5">5</a>] and "e-Books for the Future: Here But Hiding?" [<a href="#6">6</a>]. There is something very beguiling about the idea of a book that has 'the marvelous chameleon-like quality that it can very quickly be made to substitute for a different printed work by simply loading different content' [<a href="#7">7</a>] - a book that can play the role of a <em>library</em>.</p> <p>As Striphas [<a href="#8">8</a>] points out, the concept of the electronic book, and the exploration of the interaction between the size of a container and the quantity of knowledge held, has an extraordinarily long history. He traces the idea back to the creation of miniature manuscript books, composed of 'tiny handwriting, or micrographia', in the late 15th century, which were functional objects and could be read by means of a magnifying glass.</p> <p>Striphas notes the development of microphotography techniques in the 19th century. This was initially pioneered by John Benjamin Dancer, an optical instrument-maker who combined microscope and camera in order to create the earliest example of microphotography on record [<a href="#9">9</a>]. Luther reports that 'the 21 May 1853 issue of Notes and Queries carried a letter from a Dublin scholar asking "May not photography be usefully applied to the making of catalogues of large libraries?' Microphotography led to the report in the British <em>Photographic Journal</em> of, 'A page of printing, from Quekett's "Treatise on the Microscope", reduced to such size that the whole of the volume of 560 pages could be contained in a space one inch long and half-an-inch broad ' [<a href="#8">8</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/tonkin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article emma tonkin amazon american library association apple british library google international digital publishing forum iso jisc massachusetts institute of technology microsoft ukoln university of bath university of chicago wikipedia aac access control accessibility adobe android blog bmp cataloguing copyright data digital library doc document format drm ebook epub file format flac flash gif html hypertext infrastructure ipad iphone itunes jpeg jpg linux mis mobi mobile mobile phone mp3 ogg open access operating system plain text png research rtf search technology smartphone software standardisation standards tiff usb windows wireless Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1529 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="events1"></a></p> <h3 id="UKeiG_Intranet-s_Forum:_ERM-s_Knowledge_Sharing_Platform_February_2010">UKeiG Intranet's Forum: ERM's Knowledge Sharing Platform – February 2010</h3> <p>UKeiG Intranet's Forum: ERM's Knowledge Sharing Platform:<br />A chance to see one of the world's top 10 best intranets<br />Free informal Intranets Forum meeting for UKeiG members</p> <p>ERM, 2/F Exchequer Court, 33 St. Mary Axe, London EC3A 8AA<br />Friday 26 February 2010, 4.00 - 5.30 p.m.<br /><a href="http://www.ukeig.org.uk/">http://www.ukeig.org.uk/</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 news and events richard waller british library cetis cilip coalition for networked information cornell university dcc georgia institute of technology imperial college london jisc loughborough university mla niso oclc serials solutions surffoundation ucisa uk data archive ukoln university college london university of london university of manchester university of utrecht europeana internet archive accessibility archives authentication bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright curation data data management data set database digital repositories dissemination e-government facebook flickr foi framework further education google analytics higher education ict infrastructure intellectual property interoperability intranet knowledge base knowledge management marc21 metadata ontologies open access openurl podcast portal preservation privacy repositories research resource description and access resource sharing second life social networks software standards twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki youtube Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1535 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Learning to YODL: Building York's Digital Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/stracchino-feng <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/stracchino-feng#author1">Peri Stracchino</a> and <a href="/issue61/stracchino-feng#author2">Yankui Feng</a> describe a year's progress in building the digital library infrastructure outlined by Julie Allinson and Elizabeth Harbord in their article last issue.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/stracchino-feng" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article peri stracchino yankui feng iso jisc oracle sherpa university of york york university yodl yodl-ing access control accessibility agile development algorithm api archives authentication avi bmp copyright data database digital library digital repositories dvd fedora commons file format gif infrastructure java jpeg jpg ldap metadata mods mp3 multimedia open source png repositories research search technology software solaris tiff tomcat url usability vra vra core wav web services xacml xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1513 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Live Blogging @ IWMW 2009 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/iwmw-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/iwmw-2009-rpt#author1">Kirsty McGill</a> provides a live blogger perspective on the three-day Institutional Web Managers Workshop, held by UKOLN at the University of Essex, Colchester, in July 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 12th annual Institutional Web Managers Workshop (IWMW) attracted nearly 200 delegates, making it the largest workshop in the event's history. Whilst the popularity of the physical event has grown, so too has the remote audience. So this year organisers Marieke Guy and Brian Kelly decided that it was time to start treating this remote audience as first class citizens.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/iwmw-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 event report kirsty pitkin amazon bbc cardiff university edge hill university google jisc ukoln university of essex university of glasgow university of southampton university of strathclyde devcsi iwmw accessibility ajax amazon web services api blog browser cloud computing content management css curation data database domain model e-learning facebook flickr html interoperability javascript metadata mobile netvibes photoshop preservation privacy research schema social web software streaming twitter uri video web 2.0 web development web resources web services wireframe Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1515 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Overlay Journals and Data Publishing in the Meteorological Sciences http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/callaghan-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/callaghan-et-al#author1">Sarah Callaghan</a>, <a href="/issue60/callaghan-et-al#author2">Fiona Hewer</a>, <a href="/issue60/callaghan-et-al#author3">Sam Pepler</a>, <a href="/issue60/callaghan-et-al#author4">Paul Hardaker</a> and <a href="/issue60/callaghan-et-al#author5">Alan Gadian</a> introduce the OJIMS Project and discuss the impact of overlay and data journals in the meteorological sciences.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v.2 to incorporate author deletions :REW 200907301643 --><!-- v.2 to incorporate author deletions :REW 200907301643 --><p>Historically speaking, scientific publishing has focused on publicising the methodology that the scientist uses to analyse a dataset, and the conclusions that the scientist can draw from that analysis, as this is the information that can be easily published in text format with supporting diagrams. Datasets do not lend themselves easily to normal hard copy publication, even if the size of the dataset were small enough to allow this, and datasets are more useful stored in digital media.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/callaghan-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article alan gadian fiona hewer paul hardaker sam pepler sarah callaghan badc jisc ncas royal meteorological society university of leeds claddier ojims rioja accessibility archives blog data data set database digital media framework identifier infrastructure metadata multimedia open access open source podcast repositories research search technology software video web 2.0 wiki Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1487 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Historic Hospitals Admission Records Project http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/hawkins-tanner <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/hawkins-tanner#author1">Sue Hawkins</a> and <a href="/issue60/hawkins-tanner#author2">Andrea Tanner</a> describe a ground-breaking Web site using children's hospital admission registers.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Historic Hospitals Admission Records Project (HHARP) is a digitisation and indexing project that covers the Victorian and Edwardian admission registers for the London children's hospitals Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), the Evelina Children's Hospital in Southwark and the Alexandra Hip Hospital in Bloomsbury, together with Yorkhill Children's Hospital in Glasgow.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/hawkins-tanner" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article andrea tanner sue hawkins institute of historical research kingston university microsoft nhs wellcome trust hharp scarlet accessibility archives data data set database digitisation metadata research search technology standardisation standards tagging Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1490 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Missing Links: The Enduring Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/missing-links-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/missing-links-rpt#author1">Alexandra Eveleigh</a> reports on a workshop on Web archiving, organised by the DPC, JISC and UKWAC at the British Library on 21 July 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2 - 2009-08-06 minor edits from v2.1.1 -REW --><!-- v2 - 2009-08-06 minor edits from v2.1.1 -REW --><p>This workshop, jointly sponsored by the DPC [<a href="#1">1</a>], JISC [<a href="#2">2</a>] and UKWAC [<a href="#3">3</a>], aimed to bring together content creators and tool developers with key stakeholders from the library and archives domains, in the quest for a technically feasible, socially and historically acceptable, legacy for the World Wide Web.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/missing-links-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 event report alexandra eveleigh british library digital preservation coalition google iso jisc leiden university oxford internet institute the national archives university of london university of oxford west yorkshire archive service internet archive accessibility archives blog data digital preservation file format framework mashup metadata mobile preservation repositories research software standards streaming twitter warc web browser web resources Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1494 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Encouraging More Open Educational Resources With Southampton's EdShare http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/morris <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/morris#author1">Debra Morris</a> describes the EdSpace Institutional Exemplar Project and the early development of EdShare for sharing learning and teaching materials within and beyond the institution.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- Version 3: Accommodating new reference from Debra Morris and ++1 reference list; 20090611 REW --><!-- Version 3: Accommodating new reference from Debra Morris and ++1 reference list; 20090611 REW --><p>The University of Southampton has around 22,000 students across six campuses: five in the city of Southampton and one in Winchester. It is a broad-based, research-intensive institution, a member of the Russell Group of UK Universities.</p> <p>The University comprises three Faculties: Faculty of Engineering, Science and Maths; Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences, and the Faculty of Law, Arts and Social Sciences.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/morris" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article debra morris blackboard cilip google ieee jisc university of southampton edspace jorum accessibility bibliometrics blackboard learning system content management copyright creative commons curation e-learning eprints facebook flickr framework infrastructure intellectual property managed learning environment metadata oer open access open source portal repositories research search technology software tagging url usability vle web 2.0 webct wiki youtube Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1468 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk