Overview of content related to 'aggregation' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/1271/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Digitisation and e-Delivery of Theses from ePrints Soton http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ball-fowler <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/ball-fowler#author1">Julian Ball</a> and <a href="/issue72/ball-fowler#author2">Christine Fowler</a> describe the partnership between the University of Southampton’s Library Digitisation Unit and its institutional repository for digitising and hosting theses.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Hartley Library at the University of Southampton has in excess of 15,000 bound PhD and MPhil theses on 340 linear metres of shelving. Consultation of the hard-copy version is now restricted to readers making a personal visit to the Library, as no further microfiche copies are being produced by the British Library and no master copies of theses are lent from the Library. Retrieval of theses from storage for readers and their subsequent return requires effort from a large number of staff.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ball-fowler" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article christine fowler julian ball abbyy british library jisc university of southampton uk theses digitisation project aggregation api archives cataloguing copyright data digitisation electronic theses eprints framework institutional repository jpeg jstor library management systems metadata oai-pmh ocr open access open archives initiative open source optical character recognition preservation repositories research search technology software url xml Tue, 30 Jul 2013 13:13:08 +0000 editor 2499 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Realising the Potential of Altmetrics within Institutions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/liu-adie <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/liu-adie#author1">Jean Liu</a> and <a href="/issue72/liu-adie#author2">Euan Adie</a> of Altmetric take a look at the growing presence of altmetrics in universities, and consider some of the potential applications.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The concept of alternative metrics as indicators of non-traditional forms of research impact – better known as ‘altmetrics’ – has been gaining significant attention and support from both the scholarly publishing and academic communities. After being adopted by many publishing platforms and institutional repositories within the past year, altmetrics have entered into the scholarly mainstream, emerging as a relevant topic for academic consideration amidst mounting opposition to misuse of the Journal Impact Factor.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/liu-adie" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article euan adie jean liu altmetric llp carnegie mellon university indiana university london school of economics university of bath university of glasgow adobe aggregation altmetrics article-level metrics blog data data set digitisation doi identifier metadata open access passwords repositories research twitter url web services Wed, 29 Jan 2014 20:21:26 +0000 lisrw 2500 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Access and Research Conference 2013: Discovery, Impact and Innovation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/oar-2013-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author1">Paula Callan</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author2">Stephanie Bradbury</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author3">Sarah Brown</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author4">Philippa Broadley</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author5">Emma Nelms</a> and <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author6">Christopher Hart</a> report on Open Access and Research 2013 which focused on recent developments and the strategic advantages they bring to the research sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Brisbane, Queensland, Australia was the host location for the second Open Access and Research 2013 conference [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The conference was held at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Gardens Point campus over 31 October – 1 November 2013. QUT has over 45,000 students and has a wide range of specialist research areas.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/oar-2013-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 event report christopher hart emma nelms paula callan philippa broadley sarah brown stephanie bradbury apple badc elsevier griffith university massachusetts institute of technology niso queensland university of technology university of sydney victoria university aggregation altmetrics archives collection development copyright creative commons curation data data citation data management data set dissemination doi e-research eprints framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata open access open data open source portfolio rae repositories research search technology software video Sun, 16 Feb 2014 18:46:48 +0000 2507 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Performance-based Funding Model: Creating New Research Databases in Sweden and Norway http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eriksson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eriksson#author1">Leif Eriksson</a> describes how the introduction of Performance-based Research Funding Systems (PRFS) has created new forms of research databases in Sweden and Norway.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The introduction of Performance-based Research Funding Systems (PRFS) models has helped to set the focus on scientific publishing since this is one of the major indicators for measuring research output. As a secondary result, it has also forced the countries that have introduced a model that is not solely based on citations to create a new form of research database; the national portal for scientific literature.</p> <p>Even in countries that have not adapted a PRFS model, these forms of portals are common. In Sweden, the national database has been the result of local universities’ and Higher Education institutions’ efforts towards a mutual search interface to the different local repositories that have emerged.&nbsp; The repositories are sometimes created to support a local funding model, but the most common reason is simply to disseminate scientific publishing.</p> <p>The contribution of publications that cannot be found in the international citation indexes are substantial even for peer-reviewed publications especially for literature in the Humanities and the Social Sciences but also in Natural Sciences by adding a lot of conference papers that would otherwise not be recognised.&nbsp; This can be seen as a side-effect of the discussions on the introduction of PRFS models. Even if not all publications meet the criteria to be recognised as scientific, a significant number of them are still added to the base of publications that can be analysed from a PRFS perspective.</p> <p>The incentive to disseminate search results is the other driving force for the national catalogues and, in this case, the portals are playing an important role since many of the publications mainly written in domestic languages are otherwise seldom visible to other researchers and the public.</p> <h2 id="Background">Background</h2> <p>The change in the Higher Education landscape has been significant over the last decades. One of the major changes has been the introduction of performance-based research funding systems (PRFS) starting with the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) in the United Kingdom in 1986 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>The incentive offered by a PRFS model is that it overturns the allocation of funding often based on historical grounds which are no longer valid. It can also be considered as a part of an orientation towards more effective management of the public sector, based on principles derived from the private sector. The central idea in this transformation is the drive to increase productivity without adding resources to the system, while replacing traditional command-and-control systems with market-style incentives [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p>Publications are playing a more and more important role in the process of evaluating research and also as an indicator in the performance-based research funding systems (PRFS). Of 14 countries which were identified as having PRFSs, at least 10 have publication output as an indicator of research quality [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p>The reason why publications are used as a PRFS indicator is that the latter measures the output of research both quantitatively and qualitatively. Moreover, those publication data are easily found in bibliographic databases.&nbsp; However, the introduction of an indicator for publications has not been without controversy in the countries that have adopted PRFS. The resulting discussions have generally focused on two main issues:</p> <ol> <li>Should publications be used as a first-order or a second-order indicator?</li> <li>Which data source would best reflect the research output in a particular country?</li> </ol> <p>OECD launched a report on various PRFS models in 2010 including a systematic exposition of the different indicators being used [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Publications are often found among the first-order indicators which are aimed directly at measuring research performance. This can be done by simply counting publications in relation to the number of research staff of a certain institution but the common practice is to add a qualitative element, either by ranking of publication channels as occurs in Denmark and Norway, or by citation analysis as operates in Belgium, that is, in the Flemish community, and Sweden.</p> <p>Second-order indicators are based on indexes instead of direct measurements. These indexes are often created as a reaction to the methodological difficulties when dealing with citation analysis. The best known indexes are Journal Impact Factor (JIF) which measures a journal’s impact through the number of citations its articles receive, and H-index which is often used on an individual level when comparing the citation history of different authors. However, both indicators are simplifications of more complex structures and have been criticised when being used for research assessment purposes [<a href="#4">4</a>].</p> <p>The second question has created even more controversy in those countries which have adopted a PRFS model. When deciding on which database would best support the publication indicator, the issue as to which type of publications should be counted immediately comes to the fore.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eriksson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article leif eriksson oracle uppsala university worldcat aggregation bibliographic data bibliographic database cataloguing data database dissemination doi higher education national library open access portal rae repositories research search technology ssh visualisation Wed, 03 Jul 2013 17:38:13 +0000 lisrw 2465 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk DataFinder: A Research Data Catalogue for Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rumsey-jefferies <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/rumsey-jefferies#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> and <a href="/issue71/rumsey-jefferies#author2">Neil Jefferies</a> explain the context and the decisions guiding the development of DataFinder, a data catalogue for the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 2012 the University of Oxford Research Committee endorsed a university ‘Policy on the management of research data and records’ [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Much of the infrastructure to support this policy is being developed under the Jisc-funded Damaro Project [<a href="#2">2</a>]. The nascent services that underpin the University’s RDM (research data management) infrastructure have been divided into four themes:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rumsey-jefferies" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article neil jefferies sally rumsey bodleian libraries datacite jisc orcid uk data archive university of oxford dmponline impact project aggregation algorithm api archives cataloguing controlled vocabularies curation data data citation data management data model data set database digital archive digital library eprints fedora commons identifier infrastructure jacs linked data metadata oai-pmh open access open archives initiative passwords preservation purl rdf repositories research research information management schema search technology semantic web software solr standards uri url vocabularies wireframe xml Thu, 13 Jun 2013 20:23:22 +0000 lisrw 2446 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Engaging Researchers with Social Media Tools: 25 Research Things@Huddersfield http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author1">Graham Stone</a> and <a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author2">Ellen Collins</a> investigate whether 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme, could help researchers understand the value of Web 2.0 tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article explores whether an online learning course can help academic researchers to become more familiar with social media tools, and seeks to understand how they can put them to use within their research and teaching activities. It does so by considering the development, implementation and evaluation of a pilot Web 2.0 course, 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme developed at the University of Huddersfield, which gives researchers a structured way to engage with selected Web 2.0 tools.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article ellen collins graham stone bbc blackboard british library cilip google jisc jisc collections research information network university of huddersfield citeulike myexperiment wikipedia aggregation archives blog creative commons data diigo dissemination e-learning facebook flickr framework further education google docs higher education identifier interoperability learning design learning objects librarything mashup metadata mobile phone open access podcast repositories research rss social networks software streaming tagging technorati twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress Thu, 27 Jun 2013 20:52:47 +0000 lisrw 2457 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 70 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 70.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Issue 70 of <em>Ariadne </em>which is full to the brim with feature articles and a wide range of event reports and book reviews.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 editorial richard waller alt amazon google hefce jisc portico rdwg ukoln university of oxford w3c ark project jisc information environment jusp liparm rdmrose web accessibility initiative wikipedia accessibility aggregation archives bs8878 controlled vocabularies data data management database digital curation digitisation ejournal framework higher education identifier internet explorer jstor licence metadata microsoft reporting services mobile open access perl portal preservation privacy raptor repositories research resource management schema search technology software standardisation standards sushi wcag web resources web services wiki xml xml schema Fri, 14 Dec 2012 14:20:23 +0000 lisrw 2417 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Motivations for the Development of a Web Resource Synchronisation Framework http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author1">Stuart Lewis</a>, <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author2">Richard Jones</a> and <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author3">Simeon Warner</a> explain some of the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article describes the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework. The Framework addresses the need to synchronise resources between Web sites. &nbsp;Resources cover a wide spectrum of types, such as metadata, digital objects, Web pages, or data files. &nbsp;There are many scenarios in which the ability to perform some form of synchronisation is required. Examples include aggregators such as Europeana that want to harvest and aggregate collections of resources, or preservation services that wish to archive Web sites as they change.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 tooled up richard jones simeon warner stuart lewis aberystwyth university cornell university imperial college london jisc library of congress niso oai oclc ukoln university of edinburgh university of oxford dbpedia europeana opendoar wikipedia access control aggregation api archives atom cache cataloguing data data management data set database digital library doi dspace dublin core eprints framework ftp higher education html hypertext identifier interoperability knowledge base linked data metadata namespace national library oai-ore oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source passwords portal portfolio preservation provenance repositories research rfc rss search technology service oriented architecture software sru srw standards sword protocol syndication twitter uri url web app web resources web services xml z39.50 Mon, 03 Dec 2012 15:58:46 +0000 lisrw 2392 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk euroCRIS Membership Meeting, Madrid http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt#author1">Rosemary Russell</a> and <a href="/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt#author2">Brigitte Jörg</a> report on the bi-annual euroCRIS membership and Task Groups meetings which took place in Madrid on 5-6 November 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>euroCRIS membership meetings [<a href="#1">1</a>] are held twice a year, providing members and invited participants with updates on strategic and Task Group progress and plans, as well as the opportunity to share experience of Current Research Information System (CRIS)-related developments and seek feedback. A CERIF (<em>Common European Research Information Format</em>) tutorial is usually included on the first morning for those new to the standard, and the host country reports on local CRIS initiatives in the ‘national’ session.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report brigitte jorg rosemary russell codata elsevier eurocris imperial college london jisc orcid ukoln university of bath reposit adobe aggregation bibliometrics blog cerif data data model data set database digital repositories dublin core framework identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability lod ontologies open access open source portal preservation rdf repositories research research information management software standards visualisation vocabularies xml Thu, 13 Dec 2012 09:07:57 +0000 lisrw 2408 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk IFLA World Library and Information Congress 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ifla-2012-08-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/ifla-2012-08-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the 78th IFLA General Conference and Assembly held in Helsinki, Finland over 11-17 August 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Sunday newcomers session chaired by <strong>Buhle Mbambo-Thata</strong> provided us with some insight into the sheer magnitude of IFLA (as most people seem to call it) or the World Library and Information Congress (to give the formal name) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. This year’s congress had over 4,200 delegates from 120 different countries, though over a thousand of these were Finnish librarians making the most of the locality of this year’s event.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ifla-2012-08-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy arl association of research libraries cni coalition for networked information dcc google ifla simon fraser university ukoln university of bath university of glasgow university of northampton accessibility aggregation archives chrome cloud computing communications protocol copyright curation data data management data set digital curation digital library digital preservation dublin core facebook framework identifier internet explorer linked data mac os metadata mobile named entity recognition preservation privacy remote working repositories research twitter video Tue, 11 Dec 2012 13:16:31 +0000 lisrw 2407 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 69 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 69.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Never blessed with any sporting acumen, I have to confess to a degree of ambivalence towards the London Olympics unfolding around this issue as it publishes. That does not mean that I do not wish all the participants well in what after all is an enormous achievement just to be able to compete there at all. While I admit to not watching every team walk and wave, I cannot deny that the beginning and end of the Opening Ceremony [<a href="#1">1</a>] did grab my attention. Who could blame me? I suspect we sat as a nation terrified to discover what this would say about us all.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 editorial richard waller bbc blackboard jisc jisc collections loughborough university ukoln university of bath university of glamorgan university of pretoria devcsi wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives authentication blog cache collection development content management data database digital preservation drupal ebook framework internet explorer json knowledge management licence metadata ocr opac open source perl refworks repositories research schema search technology shibboleth standards usability visualisation wiki xml Tue, 31 Jul 2012 11:45:13 +0000 lisrw 2372 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Launching a New Community-owned Content Service http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/milloy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/milloy#author1">Caren Milloy</a> describes some of the challenges overcome and lessons learned by JISC Collections during the development of JISC eCollections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>JISC eCollections is a set of e-resource platforms launched in November 2011 by JISC Collections, in partnership with the JISC data centres EDINA and Mimas. The platforms (Figure 1) are JISC MediaHub, JISC Historic Books and JISC Journal Archives; together, they are intended to provide a sustainable, value-for-money alternative to accessing licensed content on publisher platforms, by consolidating and hosting the broad range of historical book, journal archive and multimedia content purchased by JISC Collections on behalf of the UK education community. The vision is to provide a world-class collection that ensures users’ broadest information needs are well met, and to work in partnership with the community to improve and develop the platforms around evolving student and researcher expectations.</p> <h2 id="Background">Background</h2> <p>The primary role of JISC Collections is the licensing of content on behalf of its UK Higher Education (HE) and Further Education (FE) member organisations. Over the last 10 years, JISC Collections has invested over £40 million in centralised licensing of digital content, in perpetuity, on behalf of all its members. The first agreement was signed in 2002 for ProQuest’s Early English Books Online (EEBO). Since then, national licences have been negotiated for historic books, journal archives and multimedia content (Figure 1), such as documentaries and educational films. In 2010, JISC Collections invested a further £2.5 million in film and image content, representing UK and world history since 1987, specially selected for teaching and learning. The majority of JISC Collections’ member organisations would be unable to afford per-institution subscriptions to these book, journal and multimedia collections, so centralised licensing is critical to broadening access.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue69-milloy/fig1-jec-platforms.png" style="width: 680px; height: 213px;" title="Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service</strong></p> <h2 id="Why_Develop_JISC_eCollections">Why Develop JISC eCollections?</h2> <p>The platforms contain more than 4.5 million resources from over 20 providers. JISC Collections members were previously required to access this content via a range of separate services, each with different user interfaces and administrative requirements, and with a complex funding set-up including both JISC subsidies and publisher access fees payable by each institution. JISC Collections felt that its existing – and future – investments in content would best be protected and preserved by developing an independent service, as an affordable alternative to relying on content providers for access to perpetually licensed content. Such a service would allow the education community to take ownership of its acquisitions and assure it of future control. In 2011 each group of resources was consolidated into one platform to increase discoverability, simplify the user experience (making it more inclusive to users at all academic levels), reduce the administrative burden, and thereby enable maximum value to be derived from the initial content investments.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/milloy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article caren milloy british library edina google jisc jisc collections middlesex university mimas research information network ubird aggregation archives cataloguing data data mining database ebook further education graphics higher education licence marc metadata multimedia ocr open access optical character recognition passwords portfolio preservation provenance research resource discovery schema search technology Sat, 28 Jul 2012 16:36:05 +0000 lisrw 2356 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Delivering Open Educational Resources for Engineering Design http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/darlington <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/darlington#author1">Mansur Darlington</a> describes two methods for presenting online OERs for engineering design that were developed and explored as part of the Higher Education Academy/JISC-funded DelOREs (Delivering Open Educational Resources for Engineering Design) Project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>A great deal of information is accessible on the World Wide Web which might be useful to both students and teachers. This material, however, is of variable quality and usefulness and is aimed at a wide spectrum of users. Moreover, such material rarely appears accompanied by guidance on how it may be most effectively used by potential users. To make information more usable it must be made more readily discoverable and there should be clear – and preferably machine-readable – indications of its provenance and quality and the legitimate uses to which it may be put.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/darlington" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article mansur darlington hea heriot-watt university jisc massachusetts institute of technology university of bath jorum mrc aggregation algorithm blog copyright creative commons data e-learning framework google search higher education html identifier intellectual property json licence metadata microdata oer provenance rdf repositories research resource description resource discovery rss schema search technology software standardisation standards taxonomy ukoer url vocabularies wordpress xhtml xml Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2234 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Welsh Libraries and Social Media: A Survey http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tyler <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/tyler#author1">Alyson Tyler</a> outlines the results of a survey of Welsh libraries, their access to, and use of, social media, and offers a sample business case.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarians are, in general, often quick to pick up and experiment with new technologies, integrating them into their work to improve the library service. Social media are no exception. This article seeks to show how the adoption of social media by different library sectors in Wales is helping to deliver and promote their library services.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tyler" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article alyson tyler cymal ukoln welsh government aggregation archives blog ebook facebook file sharing flickr foi further education higher education instant messaging internet explorer moodle multimedia netvibes pageflakes repositories rss social networks tagging twitter video web 2.0 wiki youtube Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2227 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 68 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/editorial2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/editorial2#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> issue 68.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I am pleased to introduce you to the content of Issue 68, and to have the opportunity to remind you that you have a far larger number of channels into the publication’s content.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/editorial2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 editorial richard waller british library jisc massachusetts institute of technology national academy of sciences royal holloway sakai clif depositmo hydra opendoar repositories support project rsp aggregation archives blog cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data data citation data set digital repositories digitisation dissemination doi eprints facebook fedora commons foi framework higher education ict identifier information retrieval instant messaging institutional repository library management systems lucene metadata ms word multimedia ocr oer opac open source openurl preservation repositories research resource description resource discovery rss search technology second life sfx sharepoint software solr standardisation sword protocol taxonomy twitter vufind web 2.0 wordpress xml Mon, 12 Mar 2012 15:17:06 +0000 lisrw 2322 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Future of the Past of the Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/fpw11-rpt#author1">Matthew Brack</a> reports on the one-day international workshop 'The Future of the Past of the Web' held at the British Library Conference Centre, London on 7 October, 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We have all heard at least some of the extraordinary statistics that attempt to capture the sheer size and ephemeral nature of the Web. According to the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), more than 70 new domains are registered and more than 500,000 documents are added to the Web every minute [<a href="#1">1</a>]. This scale, coupled with its ever-evolving use, present significant challenges to those concerned with preserving both the content and context of the Web.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report matthew brack bbc british library bsi dcc digital preservation coalition google hanzo archives institute of historical research iso jisc kings college london library of congress nhs oxford internet institute the national archives university of oxford university of sheffield wellcome library arcomem internet archive memento uk government web archive aggregation algorithm api archives big data blog browser cache curation data data mining data model digital asset management digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi flickr identifier interoperability library data lod metadata preservation repositories research search technology social web software tag cloud twitter ulcc uri url visualisation warc wayback machine web resources wordpress youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 12:06:52 +0000 lisrw 2236 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Third Annual edUi Conference 2011 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/edui-2011-rpt#author1">Danielle Cooley</a> reports on the third annual edUi Conference, held over 13-14 October 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA, an opportunity for Web professionals in colleges, universities, libraries, museums, etc to discuss the latest developments in Web trends and technologies.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The third annual edUi Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held October 13-14, 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA. The sold-out event saw 225 ‘Web professionals serving colleges, universities, libraries, museums, and beyond’ join together to discuss the latest and greatest in Web trends and technologies. The all-volunteer conference was presented by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, and major sponsors included Microsoft, the University of Richmond, and Virginia Commonwealth University.</p> <p>The two-day event consisted of four tracks [<a href="#2">2</a>]:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report danielle cooley google happy cog kansas state university microsoft university of virginia wikipedia accessibility aggregation android archives blog browser cataloguing css data framework google docs google maps graphics higher education html html5 metadata mis mobile research responsive design search technology twitter usability video web standards widget windows xhtml youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 22:26:07 +0000 lisrw 2241 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Making Software - What Really Works, and Why We Believe It http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tonkin-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>While acknowledging the genuine usefulness of much of its content, <a href="/issue68/tonkin-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> provides helpful pointers towards a second edition.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Published by O'Reilly, as part of the Theory In Practice series, this book is essentially academic in focus. It takes the form of thirty chapters. The first eight of these aim to provide an introduction to the area of software engineering, or more specifically, the collection and use of supporting evidence to support software engineering practices. These initial chapters are satisfyingly broad in scope, covering topics from human factors and personality to complexity metrics and the process of authoring a systematic review.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tonkin-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review emma tonkin oreilly ukoln university of bath aggregation algorithm api data data mining framework open source repositories research software Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 1650 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Educational Resources Hack Day http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt#author1">Kirsty Pitkin</a> reports on a two-day practical hack event focusing on Open Educational Resources (OER), held by DevCSI and JISC CETIS in Manchester on 31 March - 1 April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Open Educational Resources Hack Day event was designed to bring together those interested in rapidly developing tools and prototypes to solve problems related to OER. Whilst there is a growing interest in the potential for learning resources created and shared openly by academics and teachers, a number of technical challenges still exist, including resource retrieval, evaluation and reuse. This event aimed to explore some of these problem areas by partnering developers with the creators and users of OER to identify needs and potential solutions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report kirsty pitkin cetis google harper adams university college jisc leeds metropolitan university oai open university ukoln university of bolton university of oxford w3c devcsi jorum oerbital xpert accessibility aggregation api authentication blog browser cataloguing creative commons data data set doi drupal facebook identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects licence linked data metadata mobile moodle oai-pmh oer open source openoffice portal provenance repositories resource sharing rss search engine optimisation search technology software storify sword protocol ukoer url video visualisation vle widget wiki wookie wordpress youtube Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1630 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 66: Sanity Check http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 66.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With institutions searching to increase the impact of the work they do, and conscious of the immediate impact of any event they organise, many will be interested to read of <a href="/issue66/guy/">10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event</a> in which <strong>Marieke Guy</strong> provides a raft of suggestions to enhance the participants' experience of and involvement in, the event they are attending.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 editorial richard waller british library google jisc ukoln university of pretoria e-curator keepit zetoc aggregation archives blog browser copyright curation data database digital audio digital preservation digital repositories file format flickr framework geospatial data gis identifier institutional repository learning objects metadata mobile mobile phone netvibes open access open source personalisation podcast preservation privacy refworks repositories research resource description and access rss search technology software streaming tagging twitter usability video web 2.0 web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1602 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 10 Years of Zetoc http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/ronson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/ronson#author1">Jane Ronson</a> looks at how Zetoc has developed and what the future holds for the service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Now celebrating its 10th anniversary, Zetoc [<a href="#1">1</a>] provides quality-assured, comprehensive journal table of contents data for resource discovery that users can search and have delivered straight to their in-box or desktop. In a nutshell, Zetoc is all about convenience, current awareness and comprehensive coverage. In a recent survey, one academic commented: 'This is a "one-stop shop" for relevant literature'. What is Zetoc, what has it achieved and where is it going? In this article I will look at the history of the service and how it has developed over the past decade.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/ronson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article jane ronson british library google harvard university heriot-watt university hewlett-packard jisc loughborough university mimas national library of wales nhs sconul stanford university university of chester university of manchester university of surrey dner my references suncat tictocs zetoc aggregation authentication bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing copac data database further education google scholar higher education identifier national library open access openurl personalisation repositories research resource discovery rss search technology shibboleth soap software sru tag cloud z39.50 Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1610 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk International Digital Curation Conference 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on the 6th International Digital Curation Conference, held on 7-8 December 2010 in Chicago.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version v2: final edits after author review 2011-01-12 REW --><!-- version v2: final edits after author review 2011-01-12 REW --><p>The International Digital Curation Conference has been held annually by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) [<a href="#1">1</a>] since 2005, quickly establishing a reputation for high-quality presentations and papers. So much so that, as co-chair Allen Renear explained in his opening remarks, after attending the 2006 Conference in Glasgow [<a href="#2">2</a>] delegates from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) offered to bring the event to Chicago.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report alex ball cni coalition for networked information cornell university datacite dcc indiana university johns hopkins university leiden university massachusetts institute of technology michigan state university national library of australia national science foundation research information network rutgers university ukoln university of arizona university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of chicago university of edinburgh university of illinois university of oxford university of sheffield university of southampton datashare i2s2 idmb myexperiment sagecite sudamih aggregation archives ark authentication blog cataloguing collection development content management curation data data citation data management data model data set database digital curation digital library e-science eprints framework identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability irods linked data linux metadata mobile national library ontologies open access open data operating system persistent identifier preservation preservation metadata provenance rdf repositories research resource description search technology semantic web sharepoint software standards tagging tei text mining twitter video virtual research environment visualisation wiki windows xml Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1611 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Blogging and RSS - A Librarian's Guide, 2nd Edition http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/cope-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/cope-rvw#author1">Elly Cope</a> reviews the second edition of this book in which the author explains how RSS and blogging can be used by librarians and libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Michael P. Sauers is a trainer in Internet technologies and this book is intended for librarians who have heard of blogging and RSS and want to start using these tools as soon as possible, but who may not have the expertise or confidence in their ability to start by themselves.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/cope-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 review elly cope google university of bath aggregation blog cataloguing microblogging perl podcast rdf rss search technology syndication twitter url Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1616 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 65: Ariadne in Search of Your Views http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 65.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may have already noted in the editorial section of this issue a link to the Reader Survey which I ask you seriously to consider completing, whether you are a frequent <em>Ariadne</em> reader or are reading the Magazine for the first time. Moves are afoot to give <em>Ariadne</em> some effort towards improvements in your experience of the publication and I cannot emphasise enough the value I place on suggestions and comments from you. I am very keen to know what readers value and dislike in <em>Ariadne</em>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 editorial richard waller dcc google griffith university jisc queensland university of technology university of oregon university of oxford wellcome trust devcsi eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih aggregation ajax archives browser curation data data management data set database digital archive droid e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis google maps higher education ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service interoperability ipad javascript metadata mobile multimedia ontologies open source preservation provenance repositories research resource description and access schema search technology software tagging taxonomy uri visualisation web 2.0 web portal xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1647 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk What Is a URI and Why Does It Matter? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/thompson-hs#author1">Henry S. Thompson</a> describes how recent developments in Web technology have affected the relationship between URI and resource representation and the related consequences.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>URI stands for Uniform Resource Identifier, the official name for those things you see all the time on the Web that begin <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'http:'</font> or <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'mailto:'</font>, for example <span class="style1">http://<em>www.w3.org</em>/</span>, which is the URI for the home page of the World Wide Web Consortium [<a href="#1">1</a>]. (These things were called URLs (Uniform Resource Locators) in the early days of the Web, and the change from URL to URI is either hugely significant or completely irrelevant, depending on who is talking—I have nothing to say about this issue in this article. If you have never heard of URIs (or IRIs, the even more recent fully internationalised version), but are familiar with URLs, just think 'URL' whenever you see 'URI' below.)</p> <p>Historically, URIs were mostly seen as simply the way you accessed Web pages. These pages were hand-authored, relatively stable and simply shipped out on demand. More and more often that is no longer the case; in at least three different ways:</p> <ul> <li>Web pages for reading have been complemented by pictures for viewing, videos for watching and music for listening;</li> <li>The Web is now more than a conduit for information, it is a means to a variety of ends; we use it to <em>do</em> things: purchase goods and services, contribute to forums, play games;</li> <li>The things we access on the Web are often not hand-authored or stable, but are automatically synthesised from 'deeper' data sources on demand. Furthermore, that synthesis is increasingly influenced by aspects of the way we initiate the access.</li> </ul> <p>It is against this background that I think it is worth exploring with some care what URIs were meant to be, and how they are being used in practice. In particular, I want to look at what is to be gained from a better understanding of how other kinds of identifiers work.</p> <h2 id="The_Official_Version">The Official Version</h2> <p>Insofar as there are definitive documents about all this, they all agree that URIs are, as the third initial says, <strong>identifiers</strong>, that is, names. They identify <strong>resources</strong>, and often (although not always) allow you to access <strong>representations</strong> of those resources. (Words in <strong>bold</strong> are used as technical terms—their ordinary language meaning is in many cases likely to be more confusing than helpful.)</p> <p>'Resource' names a role in a story, not an intrinsically distinguishable subset of things, just as 'referent' does in ordinary language. Things are resources because someone created a URI to identify them, not because they have some particular properties in and of themselves.</p> <p>'Representation' names a pair: a character sequence and a media type. The <strong>media type</strong> specifies how the character string should be interpreted. For example JPG or HTML or MP3 would be likely media types for representations of an image of an apple, a news report about an orchard or a recording of a Beatles song, respectively.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article henry s. thompson apple google ietf university of edinburgh w3c wikipedia aggregation ajax algorithm browser cataloguing cookie data framework gif google maps html hypertext identifier javascript jpg metadata mp3 png rfc search technology semantic web uri url web 2.0 web app xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1589 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Fringe 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt#author1">Martin Donnelly</a> (and friends) report on the Repository Fringe "unconference" held at the National e-Science Centre in Edinburgh, Scotland, over 2-3 September 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>2010 was the third year of Repository Fringe, and slightly more formally organised than its antecedents, with an increased number of discursive presentations and less in the way of organised chaos! The proceedings began on Wednesday 1 September with a one-day, pre-event SHERPA/RoMEO API Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] run by the Repositories Support Project team.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report martin donnelly cetis dcc duraspace edina google jisc open university sherpa ukoln university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of hull university of southampton university of st andrews addressing history crispool datashare depositmo hydra jorum memento repomman reposit repositories support project romeo sharegeo sneep wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data blog content management content negotiation csv curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi dspace eprints fedora commons file format framework geospatial data gis google maps hashtag html hypertext identifier infrastructure institutional repository ipad kml learning objects mashup metadata national library oer ontologies open access open source preservation repositories research rss search technology social networks solr standards tagging twitter uri video visualisation wordpress yahoo pipes Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1592 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Survive or Thrive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt#author1">Ed Fay</a> reports on a two-day conference organised by UKOLN on behalf of JISC to consider growth and use of digital content on the Web, which was held in Manchester in June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Survive or Thrive [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the punchy title given to an event intended to stimulate serious consideration amongst digital collections practitioners about future directions in our field - opportunities but also potential pitfalls. The event, which focused on content in HE, comes at a time of financial uncertainty when proving value is of increasing importance in the sector and at a point when significant investment has already been made in the UK into content creation, set against a backdrop of increasingly available content on the open Web from a multitude of sources.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report ed fay apple bbc california digital library cerlim edina eduserv google jisc jisc digital media london school of economics massachusetts institute of technology ordnance survey rdtf talis the national archives university of huddersfield accessibility aggregation agile development api archives blog cataloguing data digital curation digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dissemination domain model e-learning flickr geospatial data gis html identifier information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository interoperability itunes javascript linked data mashup metadata mobile personalisation preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology social networks software solr standards tagging text mining twitter usability widget Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1593 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Europeana Open Culture 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author1">David Fuegi</a> and <a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author2">Monika Segbert-Elbert</a> report on the annual Europeana Conference, held at the Westergasfabriek in Amsterdam in October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Europeana Conference is a free annual event which highlights current challenges for libraries, museums, archives and audio-visual archives and which looks for practical solutions for the future. It connects the main actors in cultural and scientific heritage in order to build networks and establish future collaborations. The Europeana Open Culture 2010 Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was the third annual conference and the biggest so far. It focused on how the cultural institutions can create public value by making digital, cultural and scientific information openly available.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report david fuegi monika elbert bbc british museum google europeana wikipedia aggregation archives authentication blog copyright creative commons data database digital library digitisation dissemination flickr framework geospatial data gis google books information society intellectual property linked data metadata open access open data open source portal provenance semantic web standards video web 2.0 Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1594 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk CIG Conference 2010: Changes in Cataloguing in 'Interesting Times' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/cig-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/cig-2010-rpt#author1">Rhiannon McLoughlin</a> reports on a three-day conference on cataloguing in a time of financial stringency, held by the CILIP Cataloguing and Indexing Group at Exeter University, from 13-15 September 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The focus of this conference was initiatives to get through the current economic climate. Cataloguing departments are under threat of cutbacks as never before. Papers on streamlining, collaborative enterprises, shared catalogues and services, recycling and repurposing of content using metadata extraction techniques combined to give a flavour of the new thrift driving management. The continuing progress of the long awaited Resource Description and Access (RDA)[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>] towards becoming the new international cataloguing standard was another hot topic.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/cig-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report rhiannon mcloughlin british library british museum cilip google ifla jisc leeds metropolitan university library of congress mla research information network sconul ukoln university of aberdeen university of exeter university of leeds university of strathclyde university of warwick aacr2 aggregation archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cidoc-crm crm data data management digital repositories digitisation ebook frbr google search higher education lcsh learning object metadata learning objects lom marc marc21 metadata ontologies open data open source repositories research resource description and access resource discovery resource sharing schema search technology semantic web software standards vle wiki xml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1595 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Software Comparison: Building Digital Library Infrastructure at LSE http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/fay <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/fay#author1">Ed Fay</a> presents a comparison of repository software that was carried out at LSE in support of digital library infrastructure development.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/fay" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article ed fay british library d-lib magazine london school of economics oai oais university of york wellcome library safir access control aggregation api archives authentication authentication service blog cataloguing content management data data management data model database digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dspace eprints fedora commons geospatial data gis identifier infrastructure institutional repository ldap library management systems linked data metadata mobile multimedia national library open access open source persistent identifier preservation preservation metadata repositories research schema search technology shibboleth software standards twitter uri video vle web app xacml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1560 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Trove: Innovation in Access to Information in Australia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/holley#author1">Rose Holley</a> describes a major development in the Australian national digital information infrastructure.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In late 2009 the National Library of Australia released version 1 of Trove [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the public. Trove is a free search engine. It searches across a large aggregation of Australian content. The treasure is over 90 million items from over 1000 libraries, museums, archives and other organisations which can be found at the click of a button. Finding information just got easier for many Australians. Exploring a wealth of resources and digital content like never before, including full-text books, journals and newspaper articles, images, music, sound, video, maps, Web sites, diaries, letters, archives, people and organisations has been an exciting adventure for users and the service has been heavily used. Finding and retrieving instantly information in context; interacting with content and social engagement are core features of the service. This article describes Trove features, usage, content building, and its applications for contributors and users in the national context.</p> <h2 id="Opportunities_for_Libraries">Opportunities for Libraries</h2> <p>I see tremendous opportunities for libraries this year because of advances in technology. The changes in technology mean that anyone can create, describe or recommend content, which means that many people and organisations are becoming librarians or libraries in their own way. Librarians should not be threatened or dismayed by this but rather encouraged, since it means that society is retaining its ongoing interest in the creation, organisation and dissemination of content, and we have an integral role to play in these developments. Libraries and librarians are relevant more than ever in this environment because we have vast amounts of data and information to share, a huge amount of information expertise, and an understanding of how technology can assist us in making information more accessible.</p> <p>We need to have new ideas and re-examine our old ideas to see how technology can help us. What things have we always wanted to do that we couldn't before, like providing a single point of access to all Australian information? Is this still pie in the sky or can we now achieve it? Libraries need to think big. As Charles Leadbeater would say 'Libraries need to think they are leading a mass movement, not just serving a clientele.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] Librarians are often thought of as gatekeepers with the emphasis being on closed access, but technology enables gatekeepers to open doors as well as close them and this is the opportunity I see. However many institutions will need to change their strategic thinking from control/shut to free/open before they can make this transition, and take a large dose of courage as well. The American author Harriet Rubin says, 'Freedom is actually a bigger game than power. Power is about what you can control. Freedom is about what you can unleash.' [<a href="#3">3</a>] The National Library of Australia already took this step forward in 2008 with the advent of the Australian Newspapers beta service, which opened up the raw text of digitised Australian newspapers to the public for improvement, without moderation on a mass scale [<a href="#4">4</a>]. With a long history of collaboration across the Australian cultural heritage sector [<a href="#5">5</a>] with regard to digitisation, storage, and service delivery, the National Library of Australia is well placed to take the lead with innovation in access to information.</p> <p>Some people may say, 'But isn't Google doing that, so why do we still need libraries?' There is no question in my mind that libraries are fundamentally different from Google and other similar services. Libraries are different to Google for these reasons: they commit to provide long-term preservation, curation and access to their content; they have no commercial motives in the provision of information (deemed by various library acts); they aim for universal access to everyone in society; and they are 'free for all'. To summarise: libraries are always and forever. Who can say that of a search engine, or of any commercial organisation, regardless of size?</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article rose holley amazon british library google national library of australia oai open library wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data bibliographic database browser copyright curation data database digitisation dissemination doc dublin core facebook flickr ftp google books identifier infrastructure lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh ocr open archives initiative persistent identifier preservation research resource sharing rss search technology tagging twitter usability video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1563 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 63: Consider the Users in the Field http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 63.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For those who can either remember or are battling still to make the technology work, be it coding, integration or test, it is easy and understandable enough if the technology assumes an overwhelming profile on the horizon of one's project and daily work. It is very understandable when they privately grumble that colleagues unburdened with the minutiae of such work display a breath-taking insouciance to the consequences of asking for a change in spec because there has been an unexpected development in the requirements of the users.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 editorial richard waller apple eifl intute iso jisc michigan state university mimas wellcome library archives hub identity management toolkit identity project mobile internet detective ux2.0 aggregation archives blog born digital data digital archive digital identity digital library digitisation dissemination facebook higher education identifier interoperability ipad mashup metadata mis mobile national library podcast repositories research search technology software standards ukad usability video web 2.0 youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1539 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Mobilising the Internet Detective http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/massam-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/massam-et-al#author1">Diana Massam</a>, <a href="/issue63/massam-et-al#author2">Andrew Priest</a> and <a href="/issue63/massam-et-al#author3">Caroline Williams</a> describe a recent project to adapt the online Internet Detective tutorial, to deliver a user-friendly mobile site which reflects their market research into user preferences for mobile content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'The mobile phone is undoubtedly [a] strong driving force, a behaviour changer…Library users will soon be demanding that every interaction can take place via the cell phone' [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/massam-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article andrew priest caroline williams diana massam apple google intute jisc mimas ukoln university of manchester w3c devcsi jisc information environment mobile internet detective transcoder accessibility aggregation android blog browser css data e-learning facebook google docs higher education information architecture ipad iphone java linked data mobi mobile mobile learning mobile phone mp3 open source opera php podcast programming language repositories research search technology sms software stylesheet video web development wireless Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1540 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Towards Interoperability: Experiences of the Archives Hub http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/stevenson-ruddock <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/stevenson-ruddock#author1">Jane Stevenson</a> and <a href="/issue63/stevenson-ruddock#author2">Bethan Ruddock</a> describe the work that the Archives Hub team has been doing to promote the sharing of content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/stevenson-ruddock" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article bethan ruddock jane stevenson courtauld institute of art jisc mimas university of london university of manchester archives hub dealing with data aggregation archives cataloguing data database digital archive ead interoperability portal repositories research resource discovery search technology software standards thesaurus ukad usability xml Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1546 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk A Pragmatic Approach to Preferred File Formats for Acquisition http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/thompson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/thompson#author1">Dave Thompson</a> sets out the pragmatic approach to preferred file formats for long-term preservation used at the Wellcome Library.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article sets out the Wellcome Library's decision not explicitly to specify preferred file formats for long-term preservation. It discusses a pragmatic approach in which technical appraisal of the material is used to assess the Library's likelihood of preserving one format over another. The Library takes as its starting point work done by the Florida Digital Archive in setting a level of 'confidence' in its preferred formats. The Library's approach provides for nine principles to consider as part of appraisal. These principles balance economically sustainable preservation and intellectual 'value' with the practicalities of working with specific, and especially proprietary, file formats. Scenarios are used to show the application of principles (see <a href="#annex">Annex</a> below).</p> <p>This article will take a technical perspective when assessing material for acquisition by the Library. In reality technical factors are only part of the assessment of material for inclusion in the Library's collections. Other factors such as intellectual content, significance of the material, significance of the donor/creator and any relationship to material already in the Library also play a part. On this basis, the article considers 'original' formats accepted for long-term preservation, and does not consider formats appropriate for dissemination.</p> <p>This reflects the Library's overall approach to working with born digital archival material. Born digital material is treated similarly to other, analogue archival materials. The Library expects archivists to apply their professional skills regardless of the format of any material, to make choices and decisions about material based on a range of factors and not to see the technical issues surrounding born digital archival material as in any way limiting.</p> <h2 id="Why_Worry_about_Formats">Why Worry about Formats?</h2> <p>Institutions looking to preserve born digital material permanently, the Wellcome Library included, may have little control over the formats in which material is transferred or deposited. The ideal intervention point from a preservation perspective is at the point digital material is first created. However this may be unrealistic. Many working within organisations have no choice in the applications they use, cost of applications may be an issue, or there may simply be a limited number of applications available on which to perform specialist tasks. Material donated after an individual retires or dies can prove especially problematic. It may be obsolete, in obscure formats, on obsolete media and without any metadata describing its context, creation or rendering environment.</p> <p>Computer applications 'save' their data in formats, each application typically having its own file format. The Web site filext [<a href="#1">1</a>] lists some 25,000 file extensions in its database.</p> <p>The long-term preservation of any format depends on the type of format, issues of obsolescence, and availability of hardware and/or software, resources, experience and expertise. Any archive looking to preserve born digital archival material needs to have the means and confidence to move material across the 'gap' that exists between material 'in the wild' and holding it securely in an archive.</p> <p>This presents a number of problems: first, in the proliferation of file formats; second, in the use of proprietary file formats, and third, in formats becoming obsolete, either by being incompatible with later versions of the applications that created them, or by those applications no longer existing. This assumes that proprietary formats are more problematic to preserve as their structure and composition are not known, which hinders preservation intervention by imposing the necessity for specialist expertise. Moreover, as new software is created, so new file formats proliferate, and consequently exacerbate the problem.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/thompson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article dave thompson microsoft mpeg wellcome library aggregation archives born digital cd-rom collection development data database digital archive digital preservation dissemination drm file format framework internet explorer jpeg jpeg 2000 metadata microsoft office open source openoffice preservation provenance real audio repositories software standards tiff usb video xml Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1547 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Turning on the Lights for the User: NISO Discovery to Delivery Forum http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/niso-d2d-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/niso-d2d-rpt#author1">Laura Akerman</a> and <a href="/issue63/niso-d2d-rpt#author2">Kim Durante</a> report on Discovery to Delivery, Creating a First-Class User Experience, a NISO Forum on today's information seekers and current standards developments held in March 2010 at the Georgia Tech Global Learning Center.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/niso-d2d-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report kim durante laura akerman amazon blackboard coalition for networked information cornell university emory university georgia institute of technology google library of congress niso oai oclc serials solutions internet archive wikipedia aggregation api application profile archives atom authentication cataloguing data database digital library digitisation drm dublin core ebook framework google books google scholar identifier interoperability jstor knowledge base marc metadata oai-pmh onix open archives initiative openurl qr code research resource sharing rss schema search technology sfx shibboleth software standardisation standards tagging video visualisation xml Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1548 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Uncovering User Perceptions of Research Activity Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/loureiroKoechlin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/loureiroKoechlin#author1">Cecilia Loureiro-Koechlin</a> discusses the outcomes and lessons learned from user tests performed on the Oxford Blue Pages, a tool designed to display information about researchers and their activities at the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Competition, complex environments and needs for sophisticated resources and collaborations compel Higher Education institutions (HEIs) to look for innovative ways to support their research processes and improve the quality and dissemination of their research outcomes. Access, management and sharing of information about research activities and researchers (who, what, when and where) lie at the heart of all these needs and driving forces for improvements.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/loureiroKoechlin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article cecilia loureiro-koechlin jisc microsoft university of oxford brii aggregation api archives blog data database ddc dissemination e-government e-research higher education identifier infrastructure metadata mis ontologies privacy research search technology semantic web software usability web services Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1526 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Abstract Modelling of Digital Identifiers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/nicholas-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/nicholas-et-al#author1">Nick Nicholas</a>, <a href="/issue62/nicholas-et-al#author2">Nigel Ward</a> and <a href="/issue62/nicholas-et-al#author3">Kerry Blinco</a> present an information model of digital identifiers, to help bring clarity to the vocabulary debates from which this field has suffered.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2, incorporating author review edits inc. lead-ins to bullet lists - 2010-02-12-19-30-rew--><!-- v2, incorporating author review edits inc. lead-ins to bullet lists - 2010-02-12-19-30-rew--><p>Discussion of digital identifiers, and persistent identifiers in particular, has often been confused by differences in underlying assumptions and approaches. To bring more clarity to such discussions, the PILIN Project has devised an abstract model of identifiers and identifier services, which is presented here in summary. Given such an abstract model, it is possible to compare different identifier schemes, despite variations in terminology; and policies and strategies can be formulated for persistence without committing to particular systems. The abstract model is formal and layered; in this article, we give an overview of the distinctions made in the model. This presentation is not exhaustive, but it presents some of the key concepts represented, and some of the insights that result.</p> <p>The main goal of the Persistent Identifier Linking Infrastructure (PILIN) project [<a href="#1">1</a>] has been to scope the infrastructure necessary for a national persistent identifier service. There are a variety of approaches and technologies already on offer for persistent digital identification of objects. But true identity persistence cannot be bound to particular technologies, domain policies, or information models: any formulation of a persistent identifier strategy needs to outlast current technologies, if the identifiers are to remain persistent in the long term.</p> <p>For that reason, PILIN has modelled the digital identifier space in the abstract. It has arrived at an ontology [<a href="#2">2</a>] and a service model [<a href="#3">3</a>] for digital identifiers, and for how they are used and managed, building on previous work in the identifier field [<a href="#4">4</a>] (including the thinking behind URI [<a href="#5">5</a>], DOI [<a href="#6">6</a>], XRI [<a href="#7">7</a>] and ARK [<a href="#8">8</a>]), as well as semiotic theory [<a href="#9">9</a>]. The ontology, as an abstract model, addresses the question 'what is (and isn't) an identifier?' and 'what does an identifier management system do?'. This more abstract view also brings clarity to the ongoing conversation of whether URIs can be (and should be) universal persistent identifiers.</p> <h2 id="Identifier_Model">Identifier Model</h2> <p>For the identifier model to be abstract, it cannot commit to a particular information model. The notion of an identifier depends crucially on the understanding that an identifier only identifies one distinct thing. But different domains will have different understandings of what things are distinct from each other, and what can legitimately count as a single thing. (This includes aggregations of objects, and different versions or snapshots of objects.) In order for the abstract identifier model to be applicable to all those domains, it cannot impose its own definitions of what things are distinct: it must rely on the distinctions specific to the domain.</p> <p>This means that information modelling is a critical prerequisite to introducing identifiers to a domain, as we discuss elsewhere [<a href="#10">10</a>]: identifier users should be able to tell whether any changes in a thing's content, presentation, or location mean it is no longer identified by the same identifier (i.e. whether the identifier is restricted to a particular version, format, or copy).</p> <p>The abstract identifier model also cannot commit to any particular protocols or service models. In fact, the abstract identifier model should not even presume the Internet as a medium. A sufficiently abstract model of identifiers should apply just as much to URLs as it does to ISBNs, or names of sheep; the model should not be inherently digital, in order to avoid restricting our understanding of identifiers to the current state of digital technologies. This means that our model of identifiers comes close to the understanding in semiotics of signs, as our definitions below make clear.</p> <p>There are two important distinctions between digital identifiers and other signs which we needed to capture. First, identifiers are managed through some system, in order to guarantee the stability of certain properties of the identifier. This is different to other signs, whose meaning is constantly renegotiated in a community. Those identifier properties requiring guarantees include the accountability and persistence of various facets of the identifier—most crucially, what is being identified. For digital identifiers, the <strong>identifier management system</strong> involves registries, accessed through defined services. An HTTP server, a PURL [<a href="#11">11</a>] registry, and an XRI registry are all instances of identifier management systems.</p> <p>Second, digital identifiers are straightforwardly <strong>actionable</strong>: actions can be made to happen in connection with the identifier. Those actions involve interacting with computers, rather than other people: the computer consistently does what the system specifies is to be done with the identifier, and has no latitude for subjective interpretation. This is in contrast with human language, which can involve complex processes of interpretation, and where there can be considerable disconnect between what a speaker intends and how a listener reacts. Because the interactions involved are much simpler, the model can concentrate on two actions which are core to digital identifiers, but which are only part of the picture in human communication: working out what is being identified (<em>resolution</em>), and accessing a representation of what is identified (<em>retrieval</em>).</p> <p>So to model managing and acting on digital identifiers, we need a concept of things that can be identified, names for things, and the relations between them. (Semiotics already gives us such concepts.) We also need a model of the systems through which identifiers are managed and acted on; what those systems do, and who requests them to do so; and what aspects of identifiers the systems manage.</p> <p>Our identifier model (as an ontology) thus encompasses:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Entities</strong> - including actors and identifier systems;</li> <li><strong>Relations</strong> between entities;</li> <li><strong>Qualities</strong>, as desirable properties of entities. Actions are typically undertaken in order to make qualities apply to entities.</li> <li><strong>Actions</strong>, as the processes carried out on entities (and corresponding to <strong>services</strong> in implementations);</li> </ul> <p>An individual identifier system can be modelled using concepts from the ontology, with an identifier system model.</p> <p>In the remainder of this article, we go through the various concepts introduced in the model under these classes. We present the concept definitions under each section, before discussing issues that arise out of them. <em>Resolution</em> and <em>Retrieval</em> are crucial actions for identifiers, whose definition involves distinct issues; they are discussed separately from other Actions. We briefly discuss the standing of HTTP URIs in the model at the end.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/nicholas-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article kerry blinco nick nicholas nigel ward d-lib magazine dest ietf oasis internet archive aggregation archives ark ascii browser cataloguing cool uri cordra curation data database digital object identifier dns document management doi e-learning ftp identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects metadata mobile mobile phone namespace ontologies openurl persistent identifier purl repositories research rfc search technology semantic web semiotic service usage model uri url vocabularies wayback machine web browser xml xml namespaces Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1528 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Scientific Communication through Aggregated Publications http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/hogenaar <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/hogenaar#author1">Arjan Hogenaar</a> describes changes in the publication and communication process which will mean that the role of authors will become a more prominent one.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 2, 2009-11-23-09-43, incorporating AH's 2 final edits REW --><!-- version 2, 2009-11-23-09-43, incorporating AH's 2 final edits REW --><p>The Internet has caused a revolution in the way scientists and scholars have access to scholarly output. Only 15 years ago, the (university) library decided what sources should be offered to the staff and individual scientists could only hope the librarian would listen to their wishes. In this system scientists frequently had no instantaneous access to the information they wanted. In such instances they had to rely on the Interlibrary Loan System.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/hogenaar" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article arjan hogenaar bbc elsevier oai royal netherlands academy of arts and sciences surffoundation university of groningen w3c escape project preserv aggregation archives atom content management data data model data set didl digital curation digital preservation e-research e-science fedora commons foaf frbr identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability linked data metadata oai-ore oai-pmh ontologies open access open archives initiative preservation rdf repositories research search technology semantic web tagging uri url video vocabularies web app web resources xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1509 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk