Overview of content related to 'access control' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/1303/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Visualising Building Access Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/brewerton-cooper <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue73/brewerton-cooper#author1">Gary Brewerton</a> and <a href="/issue73/brewerton-cooper#author2">Jason Cooper</a> describe how the imposition of visitor access control for safety purposes was developed into a useful management tool to measure library building usage.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>1980 the Pilkington Library (the Library) was opened to support the current and future information needs of students, researchers and staff at Loughborough University. The building had four floors, the lower three forming the Library Service and the top floor hosting the Department of Library and Information Studies. Entry to the building was via the third floor (having been built against a hill) and there was a turnstile gate to count the number of visitors. The entrance of the building was revamped in 2000 and the turnstile replaced with a people counter that used an infra-red beam.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/brewerton-cooper" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue73 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper loughborough university sconul w3c access control ajax api blog browser data database higher education html html5 internet explorer javascript jquery json library management systems mobile perl vocabularies web app xhtml Thu, 10 Jul 2014 14:57:04 +0000 lisrw 2531 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Motivations for the Development of a Web Resource Synchronisation Framework http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author1">Stuart Lewis</a>, <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author2">Richard Jones</a> and <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author3">Simeon Warner</a> explain some of the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article describes the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework. The Framework addresses the need to synchronise resources between Web sites. &nbsp;Resources cover a wide spectrum of types, such as metadata, digital objects, Web pages, or data files. &nbsp;There are many scenarios in which the ability to perform some form of synchronisation is required. Examples include aggregators such as Europeana that want to harvest and aggregate collections of resources, or preservation services that wish to archive Web sites as they change.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 tooled up richard jones simeon warner stuart lewis aberystwyth university cornell university imperial college london jisc library of congress niso oai oclc ukoln university of edinburgh university of oxford dbpedia europeana opendoar wikipedia access control aggregation api archives atom cache cataloguing data data management data set database digital library doi dspace dublin core eprints framework ftp higher education html hypertext identifier interoperability knowledge base linked data metadata namespace national library oai-ore oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source passwords portal portfolio preservation provenance repositories research rfc rss search technology service oriented architecture software sru srw standards sword protocol syndication twitter uri url web app web resources web services xml z39.50 Mon, 03 Dec 2012 15:58:46 +0000 lisrw 2392 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Redeveloping the Loughborough Online Reading List System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author1">Jon Knight</a>, <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author2">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author3">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the redevelopment of Loughborough University’s open source reading list system.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Loughborough Online Reading Lists System (LORLS) [<a href="#1">1</a>] has been developed at Loughborough University since the late 1990s.&nbsp; LORLS was originally implemented at the request of the University’s Learning and Teaching Committee simply to make reading lists available online to students.&nbsp; The Library staff immediately saw the benefit of such a system in not only allowing students ready access to academics’ reading lists but also in having such access themselves. This was because a significant number of academics were bypassing the library when generating and distributing lists to their students who were then in turn surprised when the library did not have the recommended books either in stock or in sufficient numbers to meet demand.</p> <p>The first version of the system produced by the Library Systems Team was part of a project that also had a ‘reading lists amnesty’ in which academics were encouraged to provide their reading lists to the library which then employed some temporary staff over the summer to enter them into the new system.&nbsp; This meant that the first version of LORLS went live in July 2000 with a reasonable percentage of lists already in place.&nbsp; Subsequently the creation and editing of reading lists was made the responsibility of the academics or departmental admin staff, with some assistance from library staff.</p> <p>LORLS was written in Perl, with a MySQL database back-end.&nbsp; Most user interfaces were delivered via the web, with a limited number of back-end scripts that helped the systems staff maintain the system and alert library staff to changes that had been made to reading lists.</p> <p>Soon after the first version of LORLS went live at Loughborough, a number of other universities expressed an interest in using or modifying the system. Permission was granted by the University to release it as open source under the General Public Licence (GPL)[<a href="#2">2</a>].&nbsp; New versions were released as the system was developed and bugs were fixed. The last version of the original LORLS code base/data design was version 5, which was downloaded by sites worldwide.</p> <h2 id="Redesign">Redesign</h2> <p>By early 2007 it was decided to take a step back and see if there were things that could be done better in LORLS.&nbsp; Some design decisions made in 1999 no longer made sense eight years later.&nbsp; Indeed some of the database design was predicated on how teaching modules were supposed to work at Loughborough and it had already become clear that the reality of how they were deployed was often quite different.&nbsp; For example, during the original design, the principle was that each module would have a single reading list associated with it.&nbsp; Within a few years several modules had been found that were being taught by two (or more!) academics, all wanting their own independent reading list.</p> <p>Some of the structuring of the data in the MySQL database began to limit how the system could be developed.&nbsp; The University began to plan an organisational restructuring shortly after the redesign of LORLS was commenced, and it was clear that the simple departmental structure was likely to be replaced by a more fluid school and department mix.</p> <p>Library staff were also beginning to request new features that were thus increasingly awkward to implement.&nbsp; Rather than leap through hoops to satisfy them within the framework of the existing system, it made sense to add them into the design process for a full redesign.</p> <p>It was also felt that the pure CGI-driven user interface could do with a revamp.&nbsp; The earlier LORLS user interfaces used only basic HTML forms, with little in the way of client-side scripting.&nbsp; Whilst that meant that they tended to work on any web browser and were pretty accessible, they were also a bit clunky compared to some of the newer dynamic web sites.</p> <p>A distinct separation of the user interface from the back-end database was decided upon to improve localization and portability of the system as earlier versions of LORLS had already shown that many sites took the base code and then customised the user interface parts of the CGI scripts to their own look and feel.&nbsp; The older CGI scripts were a mix of user interaction elements and database access and processing, which made this task a bit more difficult than it really needed to be.</p> <p>Separating the database code from the user interface code would let people easily tinker with one without unduly affecting the other.&nbsp; It would also allow local experimentation with multiple user-interface designs for different user communities or devices.</p> <p>This implied that a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) would need to be defined. As asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX)[<a href="#3">3</a>] interactions had been successful applied in a number of recent projects the team had worked on, XML was chosen as the format to be used.&nbsp; At first simple object access protocol (SOAP) style XML requests was experimented with, as well as XML responses, but it was soon realised that SOAP was far too heavy-weight for most of the API calls, so a lighter ‘RESTful’ API was selected.&nbsp; The API was formed of CGI scripts that took normal parameters as input and returned XML documents for the client to parse and display.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper jon knight google harvard university loughborough university microsoft gnu access control ajax api archives authentication bibliographic data blog cache chrome cookie data database digital library e-learning framework google books gpl html javascript jquery json library management systems licence metadata moodle mysql open source perl refworks restful schema shibboleth soap software sql standards web browser xml z39.50 zip Sat, 28 Jul 2012 14:32:55 +0000 lisrw 2354 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Walk-in Access to e-Resources at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author1">Kate Robinson</a>, <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author2">Lizz Jennings</a> and <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author3">Laurence Lockton</a> outline a low-cost solution to walk-in (visitor) access to licensed e-journals, drawing on their practice at the University of Bath with a wiki ERM and OPAC terminals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Although the move from print to electronic journals over the last two decades has been enormously beneficial to academic libraries and their users, the shift from owning material outright to renting access has restricted the autonomy of librarians to grant access to these journals.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>Licence restrictions imposed by publishers define and limit access rights and librarians have increasingly taken on the role of restricting access on behalf of the publisher, rather than granting access on behalf of their institution.&nbsp; In other words, librarians and their institutions are no longer free to decide who may read this material as they no longer own it.&nbsp;</p> <p>This situation has been the subject of negotiation for some time, and it is fair to say that an accommodation has been reached in many cases through less restrictive licensing terms.&nbsp; Some clearer definition of groups who can use e-journals has eased the situation for 'authorised users', such as those teaching students of an institution who are not directly employed by the institution itself, for example, through franchised courses.&nbsp; However, there is still a group of potential users who do not have a relationship with an institution other than a wish to access the Library's holdings to further their research or their curiosity.&nbsp; In the past, such access was at the discretion of the Librarian but with regard to e-journals it is now set out in publishers’ licences, usually under the terms of 'walk-in access' to these resources.&nbsp; This in itself is a positive move and seemingly restores some access control to the Librarian.&nbsp; In practice, however, it has not proved to be straightforward to implement.</p> <p>In general terms e-journal access, although via the Web, piggybacks on established University IT systems and safeguards which have not always been specifically designed to support the licence restrictions of publishers.&nbsp; The definition of an authorised user for walk-in access is usually one who has been granted access to the Library building.&nbsp; This requirement for e-journal material to be restricted to the actual library building, not just University premises, presents a technical challenge.&nbsp; It is not reasonable to expect a University's IT infrastructure to be redesigned to accommodate the needs of those who are not part of the institution.&nbsp; However, there is a balance to be struck as a tipping point has been reached, with journal holdings become increasingly e-only and widening participation becoming increasingly important to institutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>There are a growing number of groups who would like would and benefit from walk-in access.&nbsp;&nbsp; In recent years requests for access to e-journals have become more frequent from library users, such as researchers who already use and borrow hard-copy materials through the SCONUL Access scheme, and school/college students undertaking Extended Project or International Baccalaureate qualifications.&nbsp; Clearly it is desirable to support the research community of which we are part, and to encourage EP/IB students whose next steps may well be into Higher Education.&nbsp; Visits for school/college groups are increasingly encouraged at institutional level and often include teaching and other intensive support from library staff; support which increases as the range of material they are authorised to access decreases.&nbsp; Research areas and subjects for these pieces of work are diverse and cannot be easily satisfied through textbook material or residual hard-copy journal holdings.&nbsp; In this climate, we need to look again at how to implement walk-in access to open up resources wherever possible.&nbsp; To do this we first need to take two steps: to identify which online material we can allow access to and to facilitate access through a route which meets licence terms, that is, to this material only within the library building.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up kate robinson laurence lockton lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university sconul ucisa university of bath access control accessibility authentication browser cataloguing collection development data database dublin core ejournal firefox higher education infrastructure institutional repository intranet ldap library management systems licence opac open source opera operating system passwords research resource discovery resource management smartphone solaris url usability web browser wiki windows Fri, 27 Jul 2012 19:10:21 +0000 lisrw 2349 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Software Comparison: Building Digital Library Infrastructure at LSE http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/fay <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/fay#author1">Ed Fay</a> presents a comparison of repository software that was carried out at LSE in support of digital library infrastructure development.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/fay" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article ed fay british library d-lib magazine london school of economics oai oais university of york wellcome library safir access control aggregation api archives authentication authentication service blog cataloguing content management data data management data model database digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dspace eprints fedora commons geospatial data gis identifier infrastructure institutional repository ldap library management systems linked data metadata mobile multimedia national library open access open source persistent identifier preservation preservation metadata repositories research schema search technology shibboleth software standards twitter uri video vle web app xacml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1560 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Don't You Know Who I Am? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paschoud <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/paschoud#author1">John Paschoud</a> looks into identity and access management in the pre-digital and digital age, and describes how the JISC Identity Management Toolkit can help us manage identities better.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Way back in prehistory, when libraries were buildings with books in, identity management was a pretty simple challenge for them. A library was either truly 'public', in which case you did not care who came in (the more people, the more popular you were, which was 'a good thing'). Otherwise, you had to be a member, and the security officer on the door knew your face, or you could show him (it was usually a 'him', then) a card or something to prove you were a member.</p> <p>For a library to trust you to take some of its books away with you (without hiding them under your coat), you usually did have to be a member, and becoming a member entailed some sort of registration process in which you might have to prove who you were with some official-looking document. The details of each member could be recorded in some sort of register, and a card issued. Effectively taking someone's membership away again, for whatever reason, was a bit more difficult - unless there was an opportunity to wrest the precious library card from them physically!</p> <h2 id="Admissions_Rules">Admissions Rules</h2> <p>A few years ago now our Projects Team at the London School of Economics (LSE) Library [<a href="#1">1</a>] was involved in documenting and analysing the admissions rules of academic libraries in London. This was before our own library agreed to provide full access to 'the general public' (in return for Heritage Lottery grants towards a £20m building project), but I was intrigued to find that our own admissions rules included all sorts of bipartite agreements with institutions such as Kings College London (proximity, I guess) and the School of Oriental and African Studies (a lot of common-interest post-colonial subject material in each of our collections).</p> <p>The most interesting 'right of access' I found in our admissions rules was 'accredited diplomatic staff of a recognised foreign country, attached to an embassy, consulate or diplomatic mission in London'. I never actually observed anyone trying to exercise this particular right (I am excused counter duties at the library because I do not know enough about books), but I was aware that my colleagues who did serve on the Admissions Desk rota were a wonderfully diverse lot; with collectively far more knowledge of international and political affairs than this duty required. I imagined the possible scene of an intending visitor from some small state (in some dispute with the United Nations, perhaps) being rebuffed by one of our Library Assistants because he was not accredited by a <em>recognised</em> foreign country. I am sure all our LAs are much too diplomatic themselves for anything like that to actually happen now; but it did get me thinking.</p> <p>What we also discovered in the course of the same investigation was the great number of other academic libraries to which I was allowed admission, on the strength of my status as a staff member at LSE. We decided to test this out with a small 'mystery shopper' exercise. Having retrieved a copy of the access rules for South Bank University Library (with, listed somewhere on page 2, the clause allowing LSE staff members reciprocal access) I duly set off on the 171 bus, armed with the plastic card that identified me as such (with the usual un-fetching photo and the magnetic strip that magically opened the turnstile at the LSE Library when I came into the office every morning). There were two serious flaws in this plan. The first was due to the fact that single-sided photocopying was clearly the norm at South Bank, and the otherwise very polite security officer at the Perry Library was only in possession of page 1 of their admissions rules, and so he couldn't see a reason to let me in. I would like to believe that the second flaw was a result of my personal fame in the library world; but it was really because quite a lot of librarians tend to circulate around jobs in London universities, and a former LSE Library colleague was currently managing the counters there, recognised me and told the officer to let me in. The project team decided that I would need some serious disguises before being allowed out to do any more mystery shopping!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paschoud" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article john paschoud british library cardiff university jisc kings college london london school of economics school of oriental and african studies sconul south bank university ucisa university college london university of bristol es-loa identity management toolkit identity project access control archives cataloguing data data management foi graphics higher education infrastructure passwords research rfid search technology shibboleth wiki Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1542 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eBooks: Tipping or Vanishing Point? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/tonkin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/tonkin#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> investigates ebooks and takes a look at recent technological and business developments in this area.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Due in large part to the appearance since mid-2006 of increasingly affordable devices making use of e-Ink technology (a monochrome display supporting a high-resolution image despite low battery use, since the screen consumes power only during page refreshes, which in the case of ebooks generally represent page turns), the ebook has gone from a somewhat limited market into a real, although presently still niche, contender. Amazon sold 500,000 Kindles in 2008 [<a href="#1">1</a>]; Sony sold 300,000 of its Reader Digital Book model between October 2006 and October 2009. In September 2009, ebooks represented between 1% and 3% of the total US publishing market [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p>Following the JISC National eBooks Observatory Study [<a href="#3">3</a>] in the UK, one participant, David Nicolas, was quoted as stating that ebooks have 'reached the tipping point' [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Keeping in mind Bohr's statement that, 'prediction is very difficult, especially about the future', it's nonetheless safe to say that publicity about these devices is currently at a high point. But for ebook readers, as Figure 1 shows, this is not their first time in the spotlight.</p> <blockquote><p>"A good book has no ending. ~R.D. Cumming"</p></blockquote> <p>This article marks the third time that <em>Ariadne</em> has discussed the subject of ebooks, namely "Ebooks in UK Libraries: Where are we now?" [<a href="#5">5</a>] and "e-Books for the Future: Here But Hiding?" [<a href="#6">6</a>]. There is something very beguiling about the idea of a book that has 'the marvelous chameleon-like quality that it can very quickly be made to substitute for a different printed work by simply loading different content' [<a href="#7">7</a>] - a book that can play the role of a <em>library</em>.</p> <p>As Striphas [<a href="#8">8</a>] points out, the concept of the electronic book, and the exploration of the interaction between the size of a container and the quantity of knowledge held, has an extraordinarily long history. He traces the idea back to the creation of miniature manuscript books, composed of 'tiny handwriting, or micrographia', in the late 15th century, which were functional objects and could be read by means of a magnifying glass.</p> <p>Striphas notes the development of microphotography techniques in the 19th century. This was initially pioneered by John Benjamin Dancer, an optical instrument-maker who combined microscope and camera in order to create the earliest example of microphotography on record [<a href="#9">9</a>]. Luther reports that 'the 21 May 1853 issue of Notes and Queries carried a letter from a Dublin scholar asking "May not photography be usefully applied to the making of catalogues of large libraries?' Microphotography led to the report in the British <em>Photographic Journal</em> of, 'A page of printing, from Quekett's "Treatise on the Microscope", reduced to such size that the whole of the volume of 560 pages could be contained in a space one inch long and half-an-inch broad ' [<a href="#8">8</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/tonkin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article emma tonkin amazon american library association apple british library google international digital publishing forum iso jisc massachusetts institute of technology microsoft ukoln university of bath university of chicago wikipedia aac access control accessibility adobe android blog bmp cataloguing copyright data digital library doc document format drm ebook epub file format flac flash gif html hypertext infrastructure ipad iphone itunes jpeg jpg linux mis mobi mobile mobile phone mp3 ogg open access operating system plain text png research rtf search technology smartphone software standardisation standards tiff usb windows wireless Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1529 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 61: The Double-edged Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 61.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Perhaps one of the current benchmarks for gauging when a Web technology has migrated from the cluttered desks of the technorati to the dining tables of the chatterati is if it becomes a topic for BBC Radio 4's <em>The Moral Maze</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>]. More accustomed to discussing matters such as child-rearing or a controversial pronouncement of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the panel members who, over the years have ranged from the liberal to the harrumphing illiberal (and in one case, both at the same time), recently did battle over Twitter [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 editorial richard waller bbc jisc mimas national library of wales sherpa ukoln university of birmingham university of york ojims yodl yodl-ing access control ajax archives blog curation data data set digital library digital repositories digitisation fedora commons framework geospatial data gis infrastructure institutional repository javascript ldap mobile national library open access provenance repositories research search technology software technorati twitter web 2.0 xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1505 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Learning to YODL: Building York's Digital Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/stracchino-feng <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/stracchino-feng#author1">Peri Stracchino</a> and <a href="/issue61/stracchino-feng#author2">Yankui Feng</a> describe a year's progress in building the digital library infrastructure outlined by Julie Allinson and Elizabeth Harbord in their article last issue.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/stracchino-feng" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article peri stracchino yankui feng iso jisc oracle sherpa university of york york university yodl yodl-ing access control accessibility agile development algorithm api archives authentication avi bmp copyright data database digital library digital repositories dvd fedora commons file format gif infrastructure java jpeg jpg ldap metadata mods mp3 multimedia open source png repositories research search technology software solaris tiff tomcat url usability vra vra core wav web services xacml xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1513 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk SHERPA to YODL-ING: Digital Mountaineering at York http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/allinson-harbord <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/allinson-harbord#author1">Julie Allinson</a> and <a href="/issue60/allinson-harbord#author2">Elizabeth Harbord</a> describe the development of digital repositories for the University of York.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The University Library &amp; Archives' first venture into digital repositories was as part of the White Rose partnership in the original SHERPA Project [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Leeds, Sheffield and York universities have had a research partnership for some years and the library services became a consortial partner in SHERPA in 2002 to set up a joint e-prints repository called White Rose Research Online (WRRO) [<a href="#2">2</a>] . During the project which ran from 2002-2006, advocacy about Open Access and the need for wider dissemination of research outputs got underway at York.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/allinson-harbord" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article elizabeth harbord julie allinson jisc sherpa the national archives university of york archives hub ethosnet safir yodl yodl-ing access control archives authentication content management copyright data digital library digital repositories digitisation dissemination ead fedora commons framework institutional repository interoperability licence metadata multimedia open access open source preservation repositories research software streaming sword protocol vle Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1485 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Research Data Preservation and Access: The Views of Researchers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/beagrie-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/beagrie-et-al#author1">Neil Beagrie</a>, <a href="/issue60/beagrie-et-al#author2">Robert Beagrie</a> and <a href="/issue60/beagrie-et-al#author3">Ian Rowlands</a> present findings from a UKRDS survey of researchers' views on and practices for preservation and dissemination of research data in four UK universities.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Data has always been fundamental to many areas of research but it in recent years it has become central to more disciplines and inter-disciplinary projects and grown substantially in scale and complexity. There is increasing awareness of its strategic importance as a resource in addressing modern global challenges such as climate change, and the possibilities being unlocked by rapid technological advances and their application in research. In the US the National Science Board has stated that:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/beagrie-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article ian rowlands neil beagrie robert beagrie british library dcc digital preservation coalition hefce icsu jisc national e-science centre national grid service national science foundation nhs oxford university computing services research information network stm uk data archive ukoln university college london university of bath university of oxford dealing with data eidcsr access control archives curation data data management data set digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories e-research e-science framework higher education infrastructure interoperability local storage preservation repositories research standards Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1486 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2009: Evolution Or Revolution: The Future of Identity and Access Management for Research http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/eduserv-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/eduserv-2009-rpt#author1">Shirley Williams</a> reports on the Eduserv Foundation Symposium which took as its theme investigate the intersection between identity management, access management and scholarly research collaboration across institutional and geographic boundaries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/eduserv-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 event report shirley williams eduserv jisc london school of economics national e-science centre science and technology facilities council university of glasgow university of reading access control authentication blog data e-research e-science facebook flickr mobile passwords research shibboleth streaming twitter video wireless Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1500 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The DARE Chronicle: Open Access to Research Results and Teaching Material in the Netherlands http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/waaijers <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/waaijers#author1">Leo Waaijers</a> reflects on four years of progress and also looks ahead.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>While Cream of Science (Keur der Wetenschap), Promise of Science and the HBO Knowledge Bank (HBO Kennisbank) are among the inspiring results of the DARE Programme for the period 2003-06, what is more important in the long run is the new infrastructure that enables Dutch Higher Education and research institutions to provide easy and reliable open access to research results and teaching material as quickly as possible. Such open access ought to be the standard in a knowledge-driven society, certainly if the material and data have been generated with public funding.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/waaijers" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article leo waaijers d-lib magazine google jisc leiden university mpeg national library of the netherlands oai royal netherlands academy of arts and sciences sakai surffoundation university of utrecht digital academic repositories opendoar access control accessibility archives cataloguing copyright data database didl digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination doc dublin core framework higher education html ict identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability intranet knowledge base learning objects licence lucene metadata national library oai-ore oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source portal preservation rae repositories research rss rtf search technology sharepoint software standards visualisation web 2.0 web portal xml Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1350 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Googlepository and the University Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/manuel-oppenheim <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/manuel-oppenheim#author1">Sue Manuel</a> and <a href="/issue53/manuel-oppenheim#author2">Charles Oppenheim</a> discuss the concept of Google as a repository within the wider context of resource management and provision in Further and Higher Education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The development of an increasing array of tools for storing, organising, managing, and searching electronic resources poses some interesting questions for those in the Higher Education sector, not least of which are: what role do repositories have in this new information environment? What effect is Google having on the information-seeking strategies of students, researchers and teachers? Where do libraries fit within the information continuum? And ultimately, what services should they look to provide for their users?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/manuel-oppenheim" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article charles oppenheim sue manuel alt cetis d-lib magazine dcc google ieee jisc loughborough university massachusetts institute of technology oreilly university of cambridge archives hub jisc information environment midess open library access control aggregation algorithm archives bibliographic data blog born digital cataloguing copyright data database digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination e-learning google search higher education identifier ieee lom information architecture information retrieval learning object metadata learning objects librarything lom metadata multimedia open access preservation provenance repositories research resource discovery search technology social software standards tagging usability web services web standards Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1352 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ARROW and the RQF: Meeting the Needs of the Research Quality Framework Using an Institutional Research Repository http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/groenewegen-treloar <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue52/groenewegen-treloar#author1">David Groenewegen</a> and <a href="/issue52/groenewegen-treloar#author2">Andrew Treloar</a> describe the role of repositories in the forthcoming Australian Research Quality Framework (RQF) and the responses of the ARROW Project to the needs of the RQF.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This paper describes the work of the ARROW Project to meet the requirements of the forthcoming Research Quality Framework (RQF). The RQF is an Australian Federal Government initiative designed to measure the quality and impact of Australian research, and is based partly on the existing Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) held in the UK. The RQF differs from the RAE in its reliance on local institutional repositories for the provision of access to research outputs, and this paper will explain how it is envisaged that this role will be filled, and the challenges that arise from this role.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/groenewegen-treloar" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 feature article andrew treloar david groenewegen dest ims monash university national library of australia wikipedia access control accessibility authentication copyright data digital repositories dissemination dspace eprints fedora commons framework identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata national library persistent identifier preservation rae repositories research software standards xacml xml Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1326 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Fedora Users Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/fedora-users-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/fedora-users-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> and <a href="/issue48/fedora-users-rpt#author2">Richard Green</a> report from the Fedora Users Conference, a two-day meeting for users of the open source Fedora repository system held at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, over 19-20 June 2006.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/fedora-users-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 event report chris awre richard green cornell university fiz karlsruhe indiana university jisc monash university national science foundation oais rutgers university sakai technical university of denmark tufts university university of hull university of queensland university of virginia yale university repomman access control accessibility aggregation api bpel cataloguing content management data data model data set database digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination dspace e-research fedora commons framework identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability metadata mets mysql open source php preservation rae rdf repositories research research information management search technology semantic web soa soap software sql standards uri web 2.0 web services wiki xacml xml Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1260 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Folksonomies: The Fall and Rise of Plain-text Tagging http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/tonkin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue47/tonkin#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> suggests that rising new ideas are often on their second circuit - and none the worse for that.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Despite the stability of many key technologies underlying today's Internet, venerable workhorses such as TCP/IP and HTTP, the rise of new candidate specifications frequently leads to a sort of collaborative manic depression. Every now and then, a new idea comes along and sparks a wave of interest, the first stage in the Internet hype cycle.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/tonkin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 feature article emma tonkin amazon apple d-lib magazine google jisc massachusetts institute of technology ukoln access control algorithm amazon web services archives ascii blog browser controlled vocabularies copyright data data mining data set database digital repositories document management doi dublin core eprints exif institutional repository interoperability linux metadata microformats mobile mp3 operating system provenance rdf repositories research resource discovery search technology semantic web semiotic simple dublin core software standardisation standards tagging uri usability vocabularies web 2.0 web services windows xhtml Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1233 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="events1"></a>Oxford Journals to report on its open access experiments</p> <p>Oxford Journals is to stage a one-day conference to report new results from its open access experiments.</p> <p>Conference details:<br />Monday 5 June<br />10.30-16.30<br />76 Portland Place, London, W1B 1NT</p> <p><strong>Preliminary programme:</strong><br />Martin Richardson and Claire Saxby, Oxford Journals, Oxford University<br />Press Oxford Journals and Open Access</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 news and events richard waller loughborough university oxford university press university college london university of bath university of california berkeley university of oxford yale university iwmw access control bibliographic data content management digital library digital repositories e-science fedora commons framework free software higher education interoperability knowledge management metadata mis mp3 open access open source podcast rdf repositories research rss search technology semantic web software standards tagging web app web development web services xacml xml Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1240 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Distributed Services Registry Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/dsr-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue45/dsr-rpt#author1">John Gilby</a> reports on the UKOLN/IESR two-day workshop at Scarman House, University of Warwick on 14-15 July 2005.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The number of available online digital collections is growing all the time and with this comes the need to discover these collections, both by machine (m2m) and by end-users. There is also a trend towards service-orientated architectures and a likely critical part of this will be service registries to assist with discovering services andtheir associated collections. UKOLN and the JISC Information Environment Services Registry Project (IESR) [<a href="#1">1</a>] organised a two-day workshop to look at some of the issues that are likely to be present in building a distributed approach.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/dsr-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue45 event report john gilby cetis google jisc london school of economics mimas niso oai oclc oregon state university ukoln university of illinois university of liverpool university of oxford iesr jisc information environment access control application profile archives authentication collection description cordra creative commons data digital library dns dublin core e-learning e-science framework infrastructure intellectual property marc metadata oai-pmh open archives initiative openurl portal provenance repositories research rslp rss schema search technology service registry soap sru srw standards uddi url web services wiki xml xml schema z39.50 Sat, 29 Oct 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1196 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Mobile Blogs, Personal Reflections and Learning Environments: The RAMBLE Project http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/trafford <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue44/trafford#author1">Paul Trafford</a> describes how mobile blogs for personal reflection may be related to institutional learning environments, drawing on experiences from the RAMBLE Project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Public participation in the Internet has continued to boom, aided in no small measure by the 'weblog' (or, simply, 'blog'), one of the most accessible means of online publication, a term that is rapidly entering common parlance. Blogs are authored by people from many walks of life and are of many kinds: for instance, Penny Garrod has shown how they can support reading groups and community links, such as news from local councillors [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/trafford" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue44 feature article paul trafford bbc blackboard ims jisc microsoft university of oxford bewt ples access control aggregation atom authentication blog browser cache controlled vocabularies data e-learning framework higher education html ims enterprise infrastructure mobile open source operating system privacy rdf research rss search technology sms software stylesheet syndication video vle vocabularies wireless xml xslt Fri, 29 Jul 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1166 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Installing Shibboleth http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/mcleish <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue43/mcleish#author1">Simon McLeish</a> describes the experience of Shibboleth installation in a Higher Education environment, and suggests ways to make this experience more user-friendly.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="What_and_Why_Is_Shibboleth">What and Why Is Shibboleth?</h2> <p>One of the major issues that faces all today's Internet users is identity management: how to prove to a Web site that you are who you claim you are, and do so securely enough to prevent someone else being able to convince the Web site that they are you. There are many initiatives attacking the problem, with approaches both technical and legal.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/mcleish" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 tooled up simon mcleish edina eduserv google london school of economics microsoft mimas perseus sdss access control apache archives authentication cookie data fedora commons higher education infrastructure institutional repository ldap licence linux metadata open source passwords portal repositories research saml schema search technology shibboleth software standards tomcat wiki windows xml Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1148 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk EuroCAMP 2005 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/eurocamp-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue43/eurocamp-rpt#author1">Masha Garibyan</a> and <a href="/issue43/eurocamp-rpt#author2">Ann Borda</a> report on the first Campus Architecture Middleware Planning workshop in Europe hosted by the Politecnico di Torino.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The rapid expansion of the Web and Internet in recent years has brought many benefits. It has never been easier to access scholarly information from anywhere in the world in real time. However, this information is often held in disparate systems and is protected by a variety of access control mechanisms, such as usernames and passwords. Many users have to struggle with increasingly complicated access control systems in order to access information they require. This is especially the case in Higher and Further Education.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/eurocamp-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 event report ann borda masha garibyan eduserv jisc london school of economics microsoft oasis stanford university university of kent perseus access control authentication data digital identity e-research further education higher education identifier infrastructure interoperability jstor ldap metadata open source passwords portal preservation privacy repositories research saml schema shibboleth software xacml Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1150 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making the Case for a Wiki http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue42/tonkin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue42/tonkin#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> examines wikis and considers the feasibility of their deployment - and the danger of the 'tumbleweed' syndrome.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Introduction:_What_is_a_Wiki">Introduction: What is a Wiki?</h2> <p>Software use cases are necessarily incomplete, a failing which seems to intensify in reverse proportion to the degree of simplicity in the software in question. Complex software responds to a given set of requirements, simple software as a partial solution to a much broader problem set. More concisely put, certain ideas just seem to catch on, particularly the simple, brilliant, 'now why didn't I think of that' class of ideas.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue42/tonkin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue42 feature article emma tonkin ukoln university of oxford wikipedia access control archives authentication blog content management data database html hypertext interoperability intranet knowledge base perl php python repositories research rss ruby search technology soap software syndication web development wiki xml Sun, 30 Jan 2005 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1113 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Shibboleth Installation Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue42/shibboleth-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue42/shibboleth-rpt#author1">James Sankar</a> and <a href="/issue42/shibboleth-rpt#author2">Masha Garibyan</a> report on the first ever Shibboleth Installation Workshop in the UK.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Staff and students in Higher and Further Education institutions currently experience an overload of information. In many cases, this information is held on different systems, available via widely differing levels of access control, ranging from open to strictly controlled access. Access controls are also subject to data protection legislation and/or tough licensing conditions. One way of overcoming the problem of accessing information from various systems is to build Web portals. These can provide a superficial environment for the presentation of information from various sources.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue42/shibboleth-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue42 event report james sankar masha garibyan jisc london school of economics ukerna perseus access control authentication data ejournal further education identifier infrastructure jstor open source portal privacy research shibboleth software web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2005 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1123 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Rights Management and Digital Library Requirements http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/coyle <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue40/coyle#author1">Karen Coyle</a> describes some aspects of rights expression languages favoured by the commercial content industries and how these may differ from the rights needs of digital libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It is common to hear members of the digital library community debating the relative merits of the two most common rights expression languages (RELs) - the Open Digital Rights Language (ODRL) and the rights language developed for the Motion Picture Expert Group (MPEG) and recently adopted by the International Organization for Standardization [<a href="#1">1</a>] - and which is preferable for digital library systems.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/coyle" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue40 feature article karen coyle iso library of congress microsoft mpeg oasis romeo access control adobe algorithm archives copyright data digital archive digital library dissemination drm dublin core ebook framework intellectual property interoperability licence metadata mets multimedia odrl open access operating system privacy provenance research resource management schema software standardisation standards taxonomy Thu, 29 Jul 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1051 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk DAEDALUS: Initial Experiences With EPrints and DSpace at the University of Glasgow http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/nixon <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue37/nixon#author1">William Nixon</a> provides an overview of the DAEDALUS initial experience with the GNU EPrints and DSpace software and the decision to employ both.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.lib.gla.ac.uk/daedalus/index.html ">DAEDALUS</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] is a three-year JISC-funded project under the <a href="http://www.jisc.ac.uk/index.cfm?name=programme_fair">FAIR</a> Programme [<a href="#2">2</a>] which will build a network of open access digital collections at the University of Glasgow. These collections will enable us to unlock access to a wide range of our institutional scholarly output. This output includes not only published and peer-reviewed papers but also administrative documents, research finding aids, pre-prints and theses.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/nixon" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue37 feature article william nixon digital preservation coalition hewlett-packard jisc lund university massachusetts institute of technology oai sherpa university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of southampton daedalus gnu access control apache archives bibliographic data bsd bsd licence copyright data set database digital preservation digital repositories dspace electronic theses eprints free software java licence linux metadata multimedia mysql oai-pmh open access open archives initiative operating system perl preservation programming language repositories research search technology software solaris stylesheet tomcat url xml Thu, 30 Oct 2003 00:00:00 +0000 editor 993 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Access Management: The Key to a Portal - The Experience of the Subject Portals Project http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue35/SPP <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue35/SPP#author1">Francisco Pinto</a> and <a href="/issue35/SPP#author2">Michael Fraser</a> report on the experience of the Subject Portals Project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Portals are widely suggested as important tools to facilitate the hard task of finding and accessing useful information for learning, teaching and research [<a href="#1">1</a>]. In this context, the Resource Discovery Network (RDN) [<a href="#2">2</a>] is enrolled in the Subject Portals Project (SPP) [<a href="#3">3</a>] with the aim of developing and deploying subject-based portals to provide the UK's HE and FE communities with integrated access to distributed resources within the JISC Information Environment (IE) [<a href="#4">4</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue35/SPP" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue35 feature article francisco pinto michael a. fraser cni ieee jisc london school of economics microsoft oxford university computing services ukoln university of oxford dner eevl jisc information environment sosig subject portals project access control apache api archives authentication authorisation service browser cookie data data set database digital library dublin core framework further education infrastructure internet explorer interoperability java ldap metadata namespace open source passwords personalisation portal research resource discovery shibboleth soap software standardisation uportal url web browser Tue, 29 Apr 2003 23:00:00 +0000 editor 943 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 5 Step Guide to Becoming a Content Provider in the JISC Information Environment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue33/info-environment <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue33/info-environment#author1">Andy Powell</a> describes steps which content providers can take to integrate their resources into the JISC IE.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This document provides a brief introduction to the <a href="http://www.jisc.ac.uk/dner/development/IEstrategy.html">JISC Information Environment (JISC-IE)</a> [1], with a particular focus on the technical steps that content providers need to take in order to make their systems interoperable within the JISC-IE technical architecture.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue33/info-environment" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue33 feature article andy powell bbc ibm ims jisc mimas oai south bank university ukoln university of bath jisc information environment subject portals project zblsa access control aggregation archives authentication bath profile bibliographic data content packaging content provider cookie data database digital object identifier digital repositories doi dublin core eprints further education geospatial data gis identifier ims content packaging internet explorer interoperability learning objects marc metadata oai-pmh open access open archives initiative openurl passwords portal purl rdf repositories research resource discovery rss search technology service registry sfx simple dublin core soap srw uri url web services xml z39.50 Wed, 09 Oct 2002 23:00:00 +0000 editor 909 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk UM.Sitemaker: Flexible Web Publishing for Academic Users http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue32/maybaum <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue32/maybaum#author1">Jonathan Maybaum</a> explains how UM.SiteMaker was designed to fill an important gap in the array of tools to suit academic publishing.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In an article published in this journal last year <a href="http://sitemaker.umich.edu/maybaum/files/ariadne-june-2002.html#ref_01">[1]</a>, Editor Philip Hunter observed that the extent of use of web publishing systems in universities is surprisingly low, considering the technical sophistication of most academic environments, and he discussed some reasons that might account for this circumstance.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue32/maybaum" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue32 tooled up jonathan maybaum apple jisc access control authentication cataloguing content management data database framework graphics html infrastructure intellectual property j2ee java open source operating system passwords research standards techwatch report url usability Sun, 07 Jul 2002 23:00:00 +0000 editor 898 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ZOPE: Swiss Army Knife for the Web? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue25/zope <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue25/zope#author1">Paul Browning</a> looks at this multiple authoring environment.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Motivation">Motivation</h2> <p>I would be surprised if most people don't feel a sense of achievement when they author their first Web page. It's the first thing you ever made which potentially the rest of the world can see. Others learn about your new skill and before you know it you've become the departmental webperson and are buried in an avalanche of other people's content to "put on the Web".</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue25/zope" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue25 feature article paul browning oracle university of bristol university of wales access control apache authentication browser content management data database ftp html hypertext internet explorer ldap linux mysql object database open source passwords perl php python rdf samba search technology soap software solaris sql standards url web browser windows xml Sat, 23 Sep 2000 23:00:00 +0000 editor 730 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Z39.50 for All http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue21/z3950 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue21/z3950#author1">Paul Miller</a> looks at the Z39.50 standard and attempts to extract some meaning from the mass of associated literature.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><strong>Z39.50</strong>. Despite certain nominative similarities, it's not a robot from that other blockbuster of the summer, <em>Star Wars: The Phantom Menace</em>, but rather the cuddly and approachable name for an important standard of relevance to many working with information resources in a distributed environment.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue21/z3950" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue21 feature article paul miller ahds ansi california digital library ilrt iso jisc library of congress niso ukoln university of bath university of hull university of oxford dner access control application profile ascii authentication bath profile bibliographic data cataloguing data data management database digital library dublin core geospatial data gis higher education information retrieval interoperability marc national library opac passwords rdf resource discovery search technology software standards web app xml z39.50 zip Wed, 22 Sep 1999 23:00:00 +0000 editor 631 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Windows NT Explorer http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue21/nt-explorer <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue21/nt-explorer#author1">Brett Burridge</a> on Internet Information Server (IIS 4.0)</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>IIS has been around for quite some time now. IIS 2.0 can be found on the Windows NT 4.0 Server installation CD-ROM. This version of IIS was pretty basic, and changing advanced settings usually involved messing around with the Windows registry. Version 3.0 was little different from 2.0, but it did see the introduction of server-side scripting through the use of the innovative Active Server Pages <a href="#1">[1]</a>. By contrast, version 4.0 of IIS saw a radical change to the application. IIS 4.0 sported a completely new user interface, a host of new features, and improved reliability.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue21/nt-explorer" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue21 tooled up brett burridge jisc microsoft oracle ukoln university of bath university of essex access control apache browser cache cataloguing cd-rom copyright data data management database e-business ftp html internet explorer intranet java operating system passwords perl personalisation scripting language search technology software sql sql server standards url web app web browser web services windows xml Wed, 22 Sep 1999 23:00:00 +0000 editor 642 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Unix: What Is mod_perl? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue21/unix <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue21/unix#author1">Ian Peacock</a> explains mod_perl technology for supercharging the Apache Server.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><b>mod_perl</b> <a href="#1">[1]</a> has to be one of the most useful and powerful of the Apache modules. Beneath the inconspicuous name, this module marries two of the most successful and widely acclaimed products of OSS, the Apache Webserver <a href="#2">[2]</a> and Perl <a href="#3">[3]</a>. The result is a kind of Web developers Utopia, with Perl providing easy access to, and control of, the formidable Apache API. Powerful applications can be rapidly created and deployed as solutions to anything from an office Intranet to Enterprise level Web requirements.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue21/unix" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue21 tooled up ian peacock google microsoft oreilly cpan access control apache api archives authentication browser cache content negotiation cookie copyright database dom ecmascript google search html infrastructure interoperability intranet java javascript knowledge base mysql open source open standard perl personalisation php programming language python repositories scripting language search technology standards uri url usability web app web browser windows Wed, 22 Sep 1999 23:00:00 +0000 editor 643 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Cache: Clashing with Caching? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue21/web-cache <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue21/web-cache#author1">Ruth Jenkins</a> explores some cache related issues for Library and Information Services</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Why_are_UK_universities_using_Web_caches">Why are UK universities using Web caches?</h2> <p>Whenever a student or academic tries to connect to a Web page, there is a significant chance that another person has already viewed the same Web page in the not too distant past. If a Web page is based on a US machine, it can be slow and expensive to load directly from the US, so it is worth saving a copy of the Web page on a UK-based ‘Web cache’ (which is sometimes called a ‘proxy cache’, to distinguish it from the cache on the user’s hard drive).</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue21/web-cache" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue21 tooled up ruth jenkins arl institute of physics jisc loughborough university ukoln university of bath university of birmingham university of london university of warwick access control authentication browser cache cookie copyright ejournal higher education javascript mailbase passwords portfolio research search technology software standards url web browser Wed, 22 Sep 1999 23:00:00 +0000 editor 644 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ECMS: Electronic Copyright Management Systems http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue20/ecms <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue20/ecms#author1">Pedro Isaias</a> considers Electronic Copyright Management Systems (ECMS).</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The theme covered by this article is currently a matter for discussion in the digital library arena. Since the birth of the first digital libraries, publishers, authors and information consumers have been debating the best ways to manage access to information. It is within this context that this work is intended to make a small contribution. It illustrates the following points in an objective way:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue20/ecms" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue20 feature article pedro isaias new university of lisbon open university access control authentication cookie copyright data digital library ecms information society infrastructure intellectual property privacy software Mon, 21 Jun 1999 23:00:00 +0000 editor 605 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Tolimac: 'Smart Card People Are Happy People' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue20/tolimac <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue20/tolimac#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> explains a pilot electronic document delivery service at the University of Surrey Library.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p align="JUSTIFY">As networked information services continue to expand, libraries need to reinforce their key intermediary role between information providers and end users to achieve a double objective: facilitate user access to electronic services distributed through the Internet and guarantee payment to providers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue20/tolimac" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue20 feature article sally rumsey university of surrey access control adobe authentication cataloguing copyright database internet explorer privacy research search technology Mon, 21 Jun 1999 23:00:00 +0000 editor 607 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk JISC Content: NESLI Implications Outside the HE Community http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue20/jisc-content <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue20/jisc-content#author1">Alicia Wise</a> discusses NESLI.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most readers from within the UK Higher Education (HE) community will no doubt be aware of the National Electronic Site Licence Initiative. However, for readers from outside this sector who do not yet know the full details, and for readers who do not know the latest news about the Initiative, the first part of this article seeks to detail NESLI’s aims and objectives, and achievements so far.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue20/jisc-content" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue20 regular column alicia wise elsevier jisc johns hopkins university university of manchester elib nesli access control api archives authentication copac copyright data data set database higher education identifier jstor licence opac passwords research standardisation standards url Mon, 21 Jun 1999 23:00:00 +0000 editor 617 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk CATRIONA II Management Survey http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue18/catriona <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue18/catriona#author1">Dennis Nicholson</a> and <a href="/issue18/catriona#author2">Martin Smith</a> provide a summary report of selected results from the CATRIONA II survey on the University Management of Electronic Resources.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue18/catriona" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue18 project update dennis nicholson martin smith jisc open university elib g4 access control accessibility archives cataloguing copyright database dissemination higher education intellectual property intranet national library rae research resource description resource sharing search technology standards url usability z39.50 Sat, 19 Dec 1998 00:00:00 +0000 editor 566 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk HEADLINE (HYBRID Electronic Access and Delivery in the Library Networked Environment) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue13/headline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue13/headline#author1">Maureen Wade</a> introduces HEADLINE (HYBRID Electronic Access and Delivery in the Library Networked Environment).</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue13/headline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue13 project update maureen wade london business school london school of economics university of hertfordshire elib sosig access control bibliographic data cataloguing cd-rom copac copyright data data set database doi dublin core higher education html identifier lbs passwords search technology windows z39.50 Mon, 19 Jan 1998 00:00:00 +0000 editor 439 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Newsline: News You Can Use http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue12/news <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="EC_funds_second_phase_of_TOLIMAC_library_smart_card_project"><a name="tolimac">EC funds second phase of TOLIMAC library smart card project</a></h2> <p>Monday, October 20th, 1997</p> <address>Contact: Françoise Vandooren,<br />Université Libre de Bruxelles, Bibliotheques, Av. Franklin Roosevelt 50, 1050 Bruxelles, Belgique<br />Tel: 32 2 650 23 80 Fax: 32 2 650 41 86<br />email: <a href="mailto:fdooren@ulb.ac.be">fdooren@ulb.ac.be</a></address> <p>or</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue12/news" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue12 news and events philip hunter de montfort university robert gordon university ukoln university of bath university of edinburgh university of wales elib access control authentication bibliographic data copyright data database identifier intellectual property passwords research Wed, 19 Nov 1997 00:00:00 +0000 editor 431 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk