Overview of content related to 'kingston university' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/133/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Book Review: Introducing RDA http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/clifford-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/clifford-rvw#author1">Katrina Clifford</a> reviews a work covering the long-heralded change in the cataloguing rule set - RDA (Resource Description and Access).</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3: author final edits implemented 2011-02-22 REW --><!-- v3: author final edits implemented 2011-02-22 REW --><p>The world of information description and retrieval is one of constant change and RDA (Resource Description and Access) is often touted as being one of the most radical changes on the horizon. Early discussions were often couched very much in terms of the principles behind the move from AACR2 (Anglo American Cataloguing Rules) and the principles of a FRBR (Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records)-based system. We gradually move closer to the Library of Congress' decision on whether to adopt RDA or not, raising questions of what adoption will mean in terms not just of day-to-day cataloguing but the wider retrieval world. Therefore, it is not just cataloguers who may feel they need to gain an understanding of exactly what RDA is and what moving to it will involve. The title of Chris Oliver's book, <em>Introducing RDA: A Guide to the Basics</em>, will, as a result, catch the eye of people from many spheres of information work.</p> <h2 id="Content_of_the_Book">Content of the Book</h2> <p>Although this book is just over 100 pages long, I would say it is not necessary to start at the beginning and work your way through the book to get the most out of it. If you're looking for something that places RDA squarely within the historical context of information retrieval and the rationale behind its development then the first two chapters give a comprehensive overview in relatively few pages. Chapter 1, 'What is RDA?' introduces the idea of RDA being designed as a result of an increasingly varied range of resources in need of description, especially those that are digital in nature. Additionally there is the need to search multiple datasets at once, including those beyond libraries, in allied institutions such as museums and archives. Chapter 2, 'RDA and the international context', as implied by the title explores the relationship of RDA to international documentation standards such as ISBD (International Standard Bibliographic Description) and how it copes in terms of handling language issues of catalogue records. It is just a brief overview however, all the ideas are discussed in one or two paragraphs each. Together, these two initial chapters would easily fill in the background for an uninitiated professional, such as a library school student and indeed they show that RDA is built upon many of the key concepts touched upon in library school courses, such as Cutter's<em> Rules for a dictionary catalog</em>.</p> <p>Chapter 3 furthers this introduction by describing FRBR and FRAD (Functional Requirements for Authority Data) and how they relate to RDA. In all the more recent discussions surrounding practical aspects of the uptake of RDA, the theoretical principles underlying it are often forgotten and revisiting them can be an interesting exercise. After an overview of how FRBR and FRAD are constructed, it moves on to why they are important. One figure lays out a MARC record and labels the fields with the appropriate FRBR entities which is helpful in understanding them in context. The remainder of the chapter shows how the RDA terms have been incorporated into the layout of the sections of RDA and the wording of the rules themselves. The chapter shows why RDA is laid out in a very different way to AACR2, grouping rules by the attribute described rather than by item format. This chapter is perhaps the most difficult to work through, but I feel this is due to the nature of the content, rather than any failing on the part of the author.</p> <p>Chapter 4 is entitled 'Continuity with AACR2' and while this may indicate it will describe how catalogues may appear different, the start of the chapter focuses more on continuity in terms of governance and principles rather than on the nuts and bolts of the records themselves. It does move to describing how AACR2 has been reworked into RDA, rather than RDA being written from scratch and illustrates this with a couple of rules and wordings from both products to compare the differences and similarities. It then moves back to what is essentially an historical account of the 'deconstruction' of AACR2, which is interesting in itself; but it would have been better placed near the start of the chapter to distinguish better between the historical description and the examples from RDA which follow.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/clifford-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 review katrina clifford kingston university library of congress aacr2 archives authority data bibliographic data cataloguing data data set frad frbr information retrieval isbd marc marc21 metadata resource description and access search technology standards video wiki Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1614 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Get Tooled Up: Xerxes at Royal Holloway, University of London http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/grigson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author1">Anna Grigson</a>, <a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author2">Peter Kiely</a>, <a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author3">Graham Seaman</a> and <a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author4">Tim Wales</a> describe the implementation of an open source front end to the MetaLib federated search tool.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v4. completion of author details: institution - 2010-02-22-10-30- rew --><!-- v4. completion of author details: institution - 2010-02-22-10-30- rew --><p>Rarely is software a purely technical issue, though it may be marketed as 'technology'. Software is embedded in work, and work patterns become moulded around it. Thus the use of a particular package can give rise to an inertia from which it can be hard to break free.</p> <p>Moreover, when this natural inertia is combined with data formats that are opaque or unique to a particular system, the organisation can become locked in to that system, a potential victim of the pricing policies or sluggish adaptability of the software provider. The speed of change in the information world in recent years, combined with the actual or expected crunch in library funding, has made this a particular issue for library management system (LMS) users. While there is general agreement on the direction to take - more 'like Google' - LMS suppliers' moves in this direction can prove both slow and expensive for the user.</p> <p>Open source software has often been suggested as an alternative, but the nature of lock-in means that the jump from proprietary to open system can be all or nothing; in effect too big (and complex) a risk to take. No major UK university libraries have yet moved to Koha, Evergreen, or indeed any open source LMS [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>The alternative, which brings its own risks, is to take advantage of the pressures on LMS suppliers to make their own systems more open, and to use open source systems 'around the edges' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. This has the particular benefit of creating an overall system which follows the well-established design practice of creating a clean separation of 'view' (typically the Web interface) from 'model' (here the LMS-managed databases) and 'controller' (the LMS core code). The 'view' is key to the user experience of the system, and this separation gives the ability to make rapid changes or to integrate Web 2.0 features quickly and easily, independently of the system back-end. The disadvantage of this approach is that it is relatively fragile, being dependent on the willingness of the LMS supplier to provide a detailed and stable application programming interface (API).</p> <p>There are several current examples of this alternative approach. Some, like the Vufind OPAC, allow the use of plug-ins which adapt the software to a range of different LMSs. Others, like Xerxes, are specialised front-ends to a single system (MetaLib from ExLibris [<a href="#3">3</a>]). This has an impact on evaluating the software: in particular, the pool of active developers is likely to be smaller in the latter case.</p> <h2 id="Royal_Holloway_Library_Services">Royal Holloway Library Services</h2> <p>Within this general context, Royal Holloway Library Services were faced with a specific problem. The annual National Student Survey had given ratings to the Library well below those expected, with many criticisms centred on the difficulty in using the Library's MetaLib federated search system.</p> <p>MetaLib is a key access point to the Library's e-resources, incorporating both A-Z lists of major online databases available to library users, and a federated search tool. Feedback showed that many users found the interface less than satisfactory, with one user commenting that:</p> <blockquote><p><em>'MetaLib is possibly the worst and most confusing library interface I have ever come across'</em></p></blockquote> <p>The Library Management Team decided to remedy this as a matter of urgency and set a deadline of the start of the 2009 Autumn term. There was no funding available to acquire an alternative discovery system so the challenge was to identify a low-cost, quick-win solution for the existing one. With this work in mind, the incoming Associate Director (E-Strategy) had already recruited two new colleagues over the Summer vacation: a systems officer with Web development experience, the other an experienced e-resources manager.</p> <p>The first possible route to the improvement of MetaLib was modification of the existing MetaLib Web interface. This was technically possible but presented several major difficulties: the underlying ExLibris designs were based on the old HTML 4.0 and pre-dated current stylesheet-based design practice; the methods to adapt the designs were opaque and poorly documented, based on numbered variables with semantics that changed depending on context; and perhaps most importantly, the changes were to be made over the summer months, giving no time for user feedback on the details of the changes to be made.</p> <p>The second possibility was the use of Xerxes [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Xerxes offered the advantage of an interface design which had been user-tested on a range of (US) campuses, partially solving the user feedback issue. It was not, however, entirely cost-free, as ExLibris charges an annual maintenance fee for the MetaLib X-server API on which Xerxes depends.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/grigson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article anna grigson graham seaman peter kiely tim wales google jisc jisc collections kingston university microsoft royal holloway sconul university of london gnu api authentication data database ebook ejournal free software gpl html interoperability library management systems licence linux mysql opac open source php portal refworks repositories research search technology sfx software solaris standards stylesheet vufind web 2.0 web development web services wiki xml xslt Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1525 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Historic Hospitals Admission Records Project http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/hawkins-tanner <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/hawkins-tanner#author1">Sue Hawkins</a> and <a href="/issue60/hawkins-tanner#author2">Andrea Tanner</a> describe a ground-breaking Web site using children's hospital admission registers.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Historic Hospitals Admission Records Project (HHARP) is a digitisation and indexing project that covers the Victorian and Edwardian admission registers for the London children's hospitals Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), the Evelina Children's Hospital in Southwark and the Alexandra Hip Hospital in Bloomsbury, together with Yorkhill Children's Hospital in Glasgow.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/hawkins-tanner" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article andrea tanner sue hawkins institute of historical research kingston university microsoft nhs wellcome trust hharp scarlet accessibility archives data data set database digitisation metadata research search technology standardisation standards tagging Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1490 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="events1"></a></p> <h2 id="JISC_Digital_Media_formerly_TASI_Training_Schedule">JISC Digital Media (formerly TASI) Training Schedule</h2> <p>Four brand new courses are on offer for the 2009 season dealing with:</p> <ul> <li>Finding free images online</li> <li>Editing and managing images using Photoshop Lightroom 2</li> <li>Audio Production (recording lectures, seminars, interviews and podcasts)</li> <li>Digitising analogue video recordings.</li> </ul> <p>Courses are already filling up fast and several courses now have multiple dates to accommodate demand.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue58 news and events richard waller amazon arl association of research libraries cilip cni jisc jisc digital media kingston university loughborough university mla national library of the netherlands oclc serials solutions stanford university tasi the national archives university of chicago university of washington victoria university impact project accessibility adobe aggregation archives copyright curation data database digital curation digital library digital media digital repositories digitisation dissemination e-learning e-research ebook framework higher education information retrieval infrastructure knowledge management licence metadata mobile multimedia national library ocr open access optical character recognition photoshop podcast preservation repositories research resource discovery resource management rss semantic web video Fri, 30 Jan 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1459 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Watch: Size of Institutional Top Level Pages http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue28/web-watch <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Web Watch: <a href="/issue28/web-watch#author1">Brian Kelly</a> looks at the size of institutional top level pages.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Is your University home page big, bold and brassy? Is it colourful and interactive, making use of new technologies in order to stand out from the crowd? Or is it mean and lean, with a simple design providing rapid download times and universal access?</p> <p>This survey of the size of the entry points for UK University and College entry points seeks an answer to these questions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue28/web-watch" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue28 tooled up brian kelly canterbury christ church university central school of speech and drama de montfort university edinburgh college of art edinburgh napier university glasgow caledonian university glasgow school of art harper adams university college heriot-watt university imperial college london jisc kings college london kingston university leeds metropolitan university liverpool john moores university london business school london school of economics nottingham trent university open university robert gordon university rose bruford college royal academy of music royal college of art royal college of music royal conservatoire of scotland royal holloway royal northern college of music royal veterinary college school of oriental and african studies sheffield hallam university south bank university surrey institute of art & design ukoln university college london university of bath university of cambridge university of glamorgan university of hull university of oxford university of surrey university of wales university of west london archives copyright css data dhtml flash gif higher education html internet explorer javascript multimedia stylesheet swf url web services windows Thu, 21 Jun 2001 23:00:00 +0000 editor 811 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Watch: What's Related to My Web Site? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue27/web-watch <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>What's Related To My Web Site? <a href="/issue27/web-watch#author1">Brian Kelly</a> looks at Netscape's 'What's Related?' facility and reports on the service's findings for institutional Web servers.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Netscape-s_What-s_Related_Service">Netscape's What's Related Service</h2> <p>One possibly underused facility in the Netscape browser is its What's Related feature. When viewing a Web page, clicking on the What's Related button in the Netscape toolbar (shown in Figure 1) will display related information about the page being viewing.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue27/web-watch" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue27 tooled up brian kelly canterbury christ church university central school of speech and drama de montfort university edinburgh college of art glasgow caledonian university glasgow school of art google harper adams university college harvard university imperial college london kings college london kingston university leeds metropolitan university liverpool john moores university london business school london school of economics manchester metropolitan university nottingham trent university open university robert gordon university rose bruford college royal academy of music royal college of art royal college of music royal conservatoire of scotland royal holloway royal northern college of music royal veterinary college school of oriental and african studies sheffield hallam university south bank university surrey institute of art & design ukoln university college london university of bath university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of liverpool university of manchester university of oxford university of surrey university of wales university of west london yale university internet archive archives browser data google search higher education portal rdf search technology software url web browser Fri, 23 Mar 2001 00:00:00 +0000 editor 784 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Infopolecon http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue6/lindsay <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue6/lindsay#author1">John Lindsay</a> comments on the evolution of the UK network infrastructure, and the problems arguably generated along the way.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Jeremy Bentham coined the term 'panopticon' in his proposal for a circular prison, whose cells were exposed to a central well in which the warders were located, allowing the prisoners to see all other prisoners and to be observed at all times without ever knowing when they were being watched. Bentham also promoted the idea of political economy as the greatest good for the greatest number. Drawing on his terminology as the basis for this article, I therefore propose the new term 'infopolecon' to describe the political economy of information.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue6/lindsay" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue6 feature article john lindsay british library edina jisc kingston university microsoft ncsa sconul ucisa ukerna acorn elib niss browser cataloguing cd-rom copyright data data set database digital library digitisation higher education html infrastructure licence multimedia passwords rae research search technology standardisation url z39.50 Tue, 19 Nov 1996 00:00:00 +0000 editor 192 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk