Overview of content related to 'browser' http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/136/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Visualising Building Access Data http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/brewerton-cooper <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue73/brewerton-cooper#author1">Gary Brewerton</a> and <a href="/issue73/brewerton-cooper#author2">Jason Cooper</a> describe how the imposition of visitor access control for safety purposes was developed into a useful management tool to measure library building usage.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>1980 the Pilkington Library (the Library) was opened to support the current and future information needs of students, researchers and staff at Loughborough University. The building had four floors, the lower three forming the Library Service and the top floor hosting the Department of Library and Information Studies. Entry to the building was via the third floor (having been built against a hill) and there was a turnstile gate to count the number of visitors. The entrance of the building was revamped in 2000 and the turnstile replaced with a people counter that used an infra-red beam.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/brewerton-cooper" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue73 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper loughborough university sconul w3c access control ajax api blog browser data database higher education html html5 internet explorer javascript jquery json library management systems mobile perl vocabularies web app xhtml Thu, 10 Jul 2014 14:57:04 +0000 lisrw 2531 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The Potential of Learning Analytics and Big Data http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/charlton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/charlton-et-al#author1">Patricia Charlton</a>, <a href="/issue71/charlton-et-al#author2">Manolis Mavrikis</a> and <a href="/issue71/charlton-et-al#author3">Demetra Katsifli</a> discuss how the emerging trend of learning analytics and big data can support and empower learning and teaching.</p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p style="margin-left:18.0pt;">&nbsp;‘<em>Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted</em>.’ Attributed to Albert Einstein</p> </blockquote><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/charlton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article demetra katsifli manolis mavrikis patricia charlton bbc google ieee jenzabar london knowledge lab algorithm big data browser cybernetics data data mining database doi e-learning educational data mining framework hadoop higher education identifier learning analytics learning design modelling mooc personalisation research search technology semantic web social networks software streaming video visualisation Mon, 08 Jul 2013 20:07:14 +0000 lisrw 2476 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Developing a Prototype Library WebApp for Mobile Devices http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author1">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author2">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the development of a prototype WebApp to improve access to Library systems at Loughborough University for mobile devices.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Reviewing Loughborough University Library’s Web site statistics over a 12-month period (October 2011 – September 2012) showed a monthly average of 1,200 visits via mobile devices (eg smart phones and tablet computers). These visits account for 4% of the total monthly average visits; but plotting the percentage of visits per month from such mobile devices demonstrated over the period a steady increase, rising from 2% to 8%.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper apple google loughborough university w3c adobe ajax android apache api authentication blog browser cache cataloguing content management cookie css data framework google books html html5 ipad iphone itunes java javascript jquery json library management systems local storage metadata mobile native app native apps open source passwords perl restful rss standards tablet computer url vocabularies web app web browser web development widget xhtml xml Mon, 10 Jun 2013 13:33:09 +0000 admin 2438 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Bring Your Own Policy: Why Accessibility Standards Need to Be Contextually Sensitive http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kelly-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author1">Brian Kelly</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author2">Jonathan Hassell</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author3">David Sloan</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author4">Dominik Lukeš</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author5">E A Draffan</a> and <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author6">Sarah Lewthwaite</a> argue that rather than having a universal standard for Web accessibility, standardisation of Web accessibility practices and policies needs to be sufficiently flexible to cater for the local context.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Initiatives to enhance Web accessibility have previously focused on the development of guidelines which apply on a global basis. Legislation at national and international levels increasingly mandate conformance with such guidelines. However large scale surveys have demonstrated the failure of such approaches to produce any significant impact.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kelly-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article brian kelly david sloan dominik lukes ea draffan jonathan hassell sarah lewthwaite iso kings college london london metropolitan university oracle ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of southampton w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility agile development blog browser bs8878 cookie data doi e-learning ead framework ict mobile research responsive design social networks software standardisation standards usability video wcag web resources web services web standards youtube Mon, 08 Jul 2013 18:13:42 +0000 lisrw 2475 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Walk-in Access to e-Resources at the University of Bath http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author1">Kate Robinson</a>, <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author2">Lizz Jennings</a> and <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author3">Laurence Lockton</a> outline a low-cost solution to walk-in (visitor) access to licensed e-journals, drawing on their practice at the University of Bath with a wiki ERM and OPAC terminals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Although the move from print to electronic journals over the last two decades has been enormously beneficial to academic libraries and their users, the shift from owning material outright to renting access has restricted the autonomy of librarians to grant access to these journals.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>Licence restrictions imposed by publishers define and limit access rights and librarians have increasingly taken on the role of restricting access on behalf of the publisher, rather than granting access on behalf of their institution.&nbsp; In other words, librarians and their institutions are no longer free to decide who may read this material as they no longer own it.&nbsp;</p> <p>This situation has been the subject of negotiation for some time, and it is fair to say that an accommodation has been reached in many cases through less restrictive licensing terms.&nbsp; Some clearer definition of groups who can use e-journals has eased the situation for 'authorised users', such as those teaching students of an institution who are not directly employed by the institution itself, for example, through franchised courses.&nbsp; However, there is still a group of potential users who do not have a relationship with an institution other than a wish to access the Library's holdings to further their research or their curiosity.&nbsp; In the past, such access was at the discretion of the Librarian but with regard to e-journals it is now set out in publishers’ licences, usually under the terms of 'walk-in access' to these resources.&nbsp; This in itself is a positive move and seemingly restores some access control to the Librarian.&nbsp; In practice, however, it has not proved to be straightforward to implement.</p> <p>In general terms e-journal access, although via the Web, piggybacks on established University IT systems and safeguards which have not always been specifically designed to support the licence restrictions of publishers.&nbsp; The definition of an authorised user for walk-in access is usually one who has been granted access to the Library building.&nbsp; This requirement for e-journal material to be restricted to the actual library building, not just University premises, presents a technical challenge.&nbsp; It is not reasonable to expect a University's IT infrastructure to be redesigned to accommodate the needs of those who are not part of the institution.&nbsp; However, there is a balance to be struck as a tipping point has been reached, with journal holdings become increasingly e-only and widening participation becoming increasingly important to institutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>There are a growing number of groups who would like would and benefit from walk-in access.&nbsp;&nbsp; In recent years requests for access to e-journals have become more frequent from library users, such as researchers who already use and borrow hard-copy materials through the SCONUL Access scheme, and school/college students undertaking Extended Project or International Baccalaureate qualifications.&nbsp; Clearly it is desirable to support the research community of which we are part, and to encourage EP/IB students whose next steps may well be into Higher Education.&nbsp; Visits for school/college groups are increasingly encouraged at institutional level and often include teaching and other intensive support from library staff; support which increases as the range of material they are authorised to access decreases.&nbsp; Research areas and subjects for these pieces of work are diverse and cannot be easily satisfied through textbook material or residual hard-copy journal holdings.&nbsp; In this climate, we need to look again at how to implement walk-in access to open up resources wherever possible.&nbsp; To do this we first need to take two steps: to identify which online material we can allow access to and to facilitate access through a route which meets licence terms, that is, to this material only within the library building.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up kate robinson laurence lockton lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university sconul ucisa university of bath access control accessibility authentication browser cataloguing collection development data database dublin core ejournal firefox higher education infrastructure institutional repository intranet ldap library management systems licence opac open source opera operating system passwords research resource discovery resource management smartphone solaris url usability web browser wiki windows Fri, 27 Jul 2012 19:10:21 +0000 lisrw 2349 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The Institutional Web Management Workshop (IWMW) 2012 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/iwmw-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/iwmw-2012-rpt#author1">Kirsty Pitkin</a> reports on the 16th Institutional Web Management Workshop held at the University of Edinburgh's Appleton Tower between 18 - 20 July 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 16th Institutional Web Management Workshop (IWMW 12) took place at the University of Edinburgh's Appleton Tower – a building with a stunning panoramic view over the volcanic city.&nbsp; The event brought together 172 delegates and attracted an additional 165 viewers to the live video stream of the plenary sessions over the three days.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/iwmw-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report kirsty pitkin blackboard cetis dcc edina edinburgh college of art jisc london school of economics nesta open university paper.li robert gordon university university of bradford university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of glamorgan university of southampton university of york devcsi dmponline iwmw jorum accessibility api archives authentication browser bs8878 content management cookie data data management data set data visualisation database foi google refine graphics infrastructure kis licence mobile native apps oer open data open source plone preservation repositories research responsive design search engine optimisation standards storify tagging twitter ukoer url video visualisation wcag web development web services widget xcri-cap Tue, 31 Jul 2012 12:54:44 +0000 lisrw 2373 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The Future of the Past of the Web http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/fpw11-rpt#author1">Matthew Brack</a> reports on the one-day international workshop 'The Future of the Past of the Web' held at the British Library Conference Centre, London on 7 October, 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We have all heard at least some of the extraordinary statistics that attempt to capture the sheer size and ephemeral nature of the Web. According to the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), more than 70 new domains are registered and more than 500,000 documents are added to the Web every minute [<a href="#1">1</a>]. This scale, coupled with its ever-evolving use, present significant challenges to those concerned with preserving both the content and context of the Web.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report matthew brack bbc british library bsi dcc digital preservation coalition google hanzo archives institute of historical research iso jisc kings college london library of congress nhs oxford internet institute the national archives university of oxford university of sheffield wellcome library arcomem internet archive memento uk government web archive aggregation algorithm api archives big data blog browser cache curation data data mining data model digital asset management digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi flickr identifier interoperability library data lod metadata preservation repositories research search technology social web software tag cloud twitter ulcc uri url visualisation warc wayback machine web resources wordpress youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 12:06:52 +0000 lisrw 2236 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The Third Annual edUi Conference 2011 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/edui-2011-rpt#author1">Danielle Cooley</a> reports on the third annual edUi Conference, held over 13-14 October 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA, an opportunity for Web professionals in colleges, universities, libraries, museums, etc to discuss the latest developments in Web trends and technologies.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The third annual edUi Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held October 13-14, 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA. The sold-out event saw 225 ‘Web professionals serving colleges, universities, libraries, museums, and beyond’ join together to discuss the latest and greatest in Web trends and technologies. The all-volunteer conference was presented by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, and major sponsors included Microsoft, the University of Richmond, and Virginia Commonwealth University.</p> <p>The two-day event consisted of four tracks [<a href="#2">2</a>]:</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report danielle cooley google happy cog kansas state university microsoft university of virginia wikipedia accessibility aggregation android archives blog browser cataloguing css data framework google docs google maps graphics higher education html html5 metadata mis mobile research responsive design search technology twitter usability video web standards widget windows xhtml youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 22:26:07 +0000 lisrw 2241 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk eSciDoc Days 2011: The Challenges for Collaborative eResearch Environments http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/escidoc-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/escidoc-rpt#author1">Ute Rusnak</a> reports on the fourth in a series of two-day conferences called eSciDoc Days, organised by FIZ Karlsruhe and the Max Planck Digital Library in Berlin over 26-27 October 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>eSciDoc is a well-known open source platform for creating eResearch environments using generic services and tools based on a shared infrastructure. This concept allows for managing research and publication data together with related metadata, internal and/or external links and access rights. Development of eSciDoc was initiated by a collaborative venture between FIZ Karlsruhe – Leibniz Institute for Information Infrastructure and the Max Planck Digital Library (MPDL) and was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/escidoc-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report ute rusnak fiz karlsruhe jisc archives authentication big data browser copyright curation data data management data set database digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dissemination e-research ebook ejournal fedora commons framework higher education infrastructure internet explorer interoperability knowledge management licence metadata open source preservation provenance repositories research rich internet application soa software virtual research environment visualisation web services Mon, 27 Feb 2012 20:20:52 +0000 lisrw 2239 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Image 'Quotation' Using the C.I.T.E. Architecture http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell#author1">Christopher Blackwell</a> and <a href="/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell#author2">Amy Hackney Blackwell</a> describe with examples a digital library infrastructure that affords canonical citation for 'quoting' images, useful for creating commentaries, arguments, and teaching tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Quotation is the heart of scholarly argument and teaching, the activity of bringing insight to something complex by focused discussion of its parts. Philosophers who have reflected on the question of quotation have identified two necessary components: a name, pointer, or citation on the one hand and a reproduction or repetition on the other. Robert Sokolowski calls quotation a 'curious conjunction of being able to name and to contain' [<a href="#1">1</a>]; V.A. Howard is more succinct: quotation is 'replication-plus-reference' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. We are less interested in the metaphysical aspects of quotation than in the practical ones.</p> <p>The tools and techniques described here were supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 0916148 &amp; No. 0916421. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).</p> <h2 id="Quotation">Quotation</h2> <p>Quotation, when accompanied by citation, allows us to bring the reader's attention to bear on a particular part of a larger whole efficiently and without losing the surrounding context. A work of Biblical exegesis, for example, can quote or merely cite 'Genesis 1:29' without having to reproduce the entire Hebrew Bible, or even the Book of Genesis; a reader can resolve that citation to a particular passage about the creation of plants, and can see that passage as a discrete node at the bottom of a narrowing hierarchy: Hebrew Bible, Genesis, Chapter 1, Verse 29. We take this for granted.</p> <p>Quoting a text is easy. But how can we quote an image? This remains difficult even in the 21st century where it is easy to reproduce digital images, pass them around through networks, and manipulate them on our desks.</p> <p>A scholar wishing to refer to a particular part of an image will generally do something like this: She will open one version of an image in some editing software, select and 'cut' a section from it, and 'paste' that section into a document containing the text of her commentary or argument. She might add to the text of her argument a reference to the source of the image. The language that describes this process is that of mechanical work&nbsp;– cutting and pasting&nbsp;– rather than the language of quotation and citation. The process yields a fragment of an image with only a tenuous connection to the ontological hierarchy of the object of study. The same scholar who would never give a citation to '<em>The Bible</em>, page 12' rather than to 'Genesis 1:29' will, of necessity, cite an image-fragment in a way similarly unlikely to help readers find the source and locate the fragment in its natural context.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article amy hackney blackwell christopher blackwell clemson university furman university google harvard university national academy of sciences national science foundation university of virginia gnu homer multitext archives browser creative commons css data digital library doi dublin core firefox free software html identifier infrastructure java licence metadata namespace openoffice research safari schema software standards stylesheet tei thesaurus url urn vocabularies web browser xhtml xml xsl xslt zip Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1620 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk MyMobileBristol http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author1">Mike Jones</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author2">Simon Price</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author3">Nikki Rogers</a> and <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author4">Damian Steer</a> describe the rationale, aims and progress of MyMobileBristol, highlighting some of the challenges and opportunities that have arisen during the project.</p> </div> </div> </div> The MyMobileBristol Project is managed and developed by the Web Futures group at the Institute for Learning and Research Technology (ILRT), University of Bristol [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The project has a number of broad and ambitious aims and objectives, including collaboration with Bristol City Council on the development or adoption of standards with regard to the exchange of time- and location-sensitive data within the Bristol region, with particular emphasis on transport, the environment and sustainability. <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article damian steer mike jones nikki rogers simon price ilrt jisc jisc techdis ordnance survey ukoln university of bristol w3c web futures datagovuk devcsi mca mobile campus assistant mymobilebristol apache api atom authentication blog browser bsd cataloguing content management data data set database dissemination e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis higher education html intellectual property java javascript jena ldap licence machine learning mobile mobile phone native app native applications open data open source operating system portal portfolio rdf research resource description restful rss search technology semantic web smartphone software sparql sql standards usability web app web browser web services wiki wireless xml Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1622 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Piloting Web Conferencing Software: Experiences and Challenges http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/prior-salter <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/prior-salter#author1">Julian Prior</a> and <a href="/issue67/prior-salter#author2">Marie Salter</a> report on their experiences piloting Elluminate Live! at the University of Bath.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>In the current fiscal climate faced by educational institutions in the UK, elearning tools and technologies that promise efficiency savings as well as enhancing the quality and quantity of course offerings are gaining popularity. One such technology is Web conferencing where lectures, seminars, meetings or presentations take place online and allow for remote participation and collaboration via audio, video, instant chat and a virtual 'whiteboard.'[<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/prior-salter" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article julian prior marie salter alt alt-c aston university blackboard google jisc open university qik ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of exeter university of hertfordshire university of winchester samson wikipedia adobe blog browser data e-learning elluminate firefox further education higher education internet explorer java licence mobile moodle multimedia oer open access open source operating system portfolio safari software streaming usb video vle web browser webinar windows Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1623 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Open Educational Resources Hack Day http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt#author1">Kirsty Pitkin</a> reports on a two-day practical hack event focusing on Open Educational Resources (OER), held by DevCSI and JISC CETIS in Manchester on 31 March - 1 April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Open Educational Resources Hack Day event was designed to bring together those interested in rapidly developing tools and prototypes to solve problems related to OER. Whilst there is a growing interest in the potential for learning resources created and shared openly by academics and teachers, a number of technical challenges still exist, including resource retrieval, evaluation and reuse. This event aimed to explore some of these problem areas by partnering developers with the creators and users of OER to identify needs and potential solutions.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report kirsty pitkin cetis google harper adams university college jisc leeds metropolitan university oai open university ukoln university of bolton university of oxford w3c devcsi jorum oerbital xpert accessibility aggregation api authentication blog browser cataloguing creative commons data data set doi drupal facebook identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects licence linked data metadata mobile moodle oai-pmh oer open source openoffice portal provenance repositories resource sharing rss search engine optimisation search technology software storify sword protocol ukoer url video visualisation vle widget wiki wookie wordpress youtube Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1630 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 66: Sanity Check http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 66.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With institutions searching to increase the impact of the work they do, and conscious of the immediate impact of any event they organise, many will be interested to read of <a href="/issue66/guy/">10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event</a> in which <strong>Marieke Guy</strong> provides a raft of suggestions to enhance the participants' experience of and involvement in, the event they are attending.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 editorial richard waller british library google jisc ukoln university of pretoria e-curator keepit zetoc aggregation archives blog browser copyright curation data database digital audio digital preservation digital repositories file format flickr framework geospatial data gis identifier institutional repository learning objects metadata mobile mobile phone netvibes open access open source personalisation podcast preservation privacy refworks repositories research resource description and access rss search technology software streaming tagging twitter usability video web 2.0 web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1602 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Reading Van Gogh Online? http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/boot <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/boot#author1">Peter Boot</a> shows how log analysis can be employed to assess a site's usability, usage, and users, using the Van Gogh letter edition as an example.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v5 author edits, revised images and new table 4 : 2011-02-21-17-21 REW --><!-- v5 author edits, revised images and new table 4 : 2011-02-21-17-21 REW --><p>Large amounts of money are spent building scholarly resources on the web. Unlike online retailers, large publishers and banks, scholarly institutions tend not to monitor very closely the way visitors use their web sites. In this article I would like to show that a look at the traces users leave behind in the Web servers' log files can teach us much about our sites' usability and about the way visitors use them.</p> <p>In 2009 the <a href="http://www.huygensinstituut.knaw.nl/">Huygens Institute</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>], together with the <a href="http://www.vangoghmuseum.nl/">Van Gogh Museum</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>], published a new edition of the letters of Vincent van Gogh. The complete edition was <a href="http://vangoghletters.org/vg/">published online</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>], and is accessible for free; there is also a six-volume book edition [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The online edition was reviewed in a number of publications [<a href="#5">5</a>][<a href="#6">6</a>][<a href="#7">7</a>]. I will use the server logs of the Van Gogh edition as an example of what we can learn about our visitors. I will focus not on the simple quantities, but try to assess the visitors' access patterns. When we created the edition, our assumption was that researchers would use the web site, while people who wanted to read the letters would favour the book. The desire to test that assumption was one of the reasons for embarking on this investigation.</p> <p>When users view, or read, editions online, busy traffic is going on between their browser (e.g. Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari), and the web server where the edition is located. Web servers keep logs of this traffic, and inspecting the logs gives us an opportunity to see how people are actually using the editions that we create. When people buy a book, this shows their intention to use it, in some sense. When people go to a web site, the server registers their visit, including, depending on the design of the site, every page they read and every search they do.</p> <p>Most of the work on log analysis in scholarly environments has been done in the context of libraries researching use of electronic journals [<a href="#8">8</a>]. The financial interest in accurate knowledge about usage patterns in that context is obviously important. The LAIRAH (Log Analysis of Digital Resources in the Arts and Humanities) study [<a href="#9">9</a>] used log analysis on portal sites in order to assess usage of digital resources in the arts and humanities. I believe the present article is the first reported study on actual usage data of a scholarly digital edition.</p> <p>First I will discuss why these log data deserve investigation. I then will show what the data that we collect looks like and discuss both their potential and their limitations. I will give a brief overview of the edition site, as the log data can only be understood in the context of the site's structure and navigational facilities. Then I'll show a number of the things that can be done on the basis of the log files.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/boot" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article peter boot google huygens institute for dutch history university college london archives bibliographic data blog browser cache data digital library firefox graphics internet explorer operating system portal research safari search technology usability visualisation windows Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1603 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Saving the Sounds of the UK in the UK SoundMap http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/pennock-clark <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/pennock-clark#author1">Maureen Pennock</a> and <a href="/issue66/pennock-clark#author2">Chris Clark</a> introduce an innovative initiative from the British Library to map a 12-month soundscape of the UK.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3, being the digitally edited version now with normalised text 2011-02-19-20-46 REW --><!-- v3, being the digitally edited version now with normalised text 2011-02-19-20-46 REW --><p>The impact of the digital age upon libraries has been profound, changing not only the back office, services, and the range of materials available to users, but also the public face of libraries and the relationship between the library and its users. Within this changed relationship, collaboration, participation, and online social networks play an increasingly important role in the user experience, especially in large university and national libraries. At the same time, a shift is taking place in the type of collection items held in libraries, and the percentage of born-digital materials acquired is increasing on a daily basis.</p> <p>The British Library is no exception, making use of a wide range of online services and tools to engage with users and enhance access to the collections, both digitised and born-digital. Numerous initiatives are currently taking place across the Library to engage with users and address these changes, and one in particular has sought to capitalise on both the increase in participatory networks and the opportunities afforded by born-digital material. This initiative is the <em>UK SoundMap</em>, an online crowd-sourcing activity driven by the British Library in partnership with the Noise Futures Network to engage and build the community in development of a new born-digital audio-visual research resource [<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <h2 id="Unlocking_and_Integrating_Audio-Visual_Content_at_the_British_Library">Unlocking and Integrating Audio-Visual Content at the British Library</h2> <p>The UK SoundMap is being carried out as part of a wider project by the British Library's Sound &amp; Vision Department: Unlocking &amp; Integrating Audio Visual Content (UIAVC). The UIAVC project seeks to address changing user needs in a multi-media research environment by establishing the building blocks for a redefined and integrated sound and moving image service within the Library. Other, complementary initiatives in the project include:</p> <ul> <li>Modernising and enhancing interactive features in the existing Archival Sound Recordings (ASR) portal, which currently provides access to over 45,000 selected recordings of music, spoken word, and human and natural environments [<a href="#3">3</a>].</li> <li>Establishing a New Music Network to select and capture content from musicians whose work is produced outside the usual commercial channels</li> <li>Exploring and piloting new R&amp;D Tools to improve resource discovery through new search and analysis tools for speech and music [<a href="#4">4</a>]</li> <li>Increasing the amount of digital audio and video content accessible to users at the Library (i.e. onsite), and remotely</li> </ul> <p>Overall, the project is key to meeting the Library's audio-visual strategy, which aims to unlock and integrate audio-visual content across the library according to user needs. The initiatives interrelate to a significant degree as they each follow the content path from acquisition to curation to integrated delivery. They each focus on digital content (both born-digital and digitised analogue content), they embrace both onsite and remote (Web) access, and collectively they express the commitment the Library now has towards integrating audio-visual media within the research experience.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/pennock-clark" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article chris clark maureen pennock british library google android archives browser copyright curation data data set digital audio flac geospatial data gis google maps iphone metadata mobile mobile phone mp3 portal preservation privacy research resource discovery rss search technology sms social networks twitter video Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1609 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 65: Ariadne in Search of Your Views http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 65.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may have already noted in the editorial section of this issue a link to the Reader Survey which I ask you seriously to consider completing, whether you are a frequent <em>Ariadne</em> reader or are reading the Magazine for the first time. Moves are afoot to give <em>Ariadne</em> some effort towards improvements in your experience of the publication and I cannot emphasise enough the value I place on suggestions and comments from you. I am very keen to know what readers value and dislike in <em>Ariadne</em>.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 editorial richard waller dcc google griffith university jisc queensland university of technology university of oregon university of oxford wellcome trust devcsi eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih aggregation ajax archives browser curation data data management data set database digital archive droid e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis google maps higher education ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service interoperability ipad javascript metadata mobile multimedia ontologies open source preservation provenance repositories research resource description and access schema search technology software tagging taxonomy uri visualisation web 2.0 web portal xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1647 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Locating Image Presentation Technology Within Pedagogic Practice http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> contextualises image presentation technology and methods within a pedagogic framework for the visual arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article marie-therese gramstadt apple blackboard bournemouth university edinburgh college of art google imperial college london jisc jisc digital media microsoft oreilly university for the creative arts university of brighton university of london university of sheffield university of surrey university of the arts london vads pictiva accessibility adobe archives blog browser cataloguing data database digital media e-learning elluminate facebook flash flickr google maps gotomeeting higher education html5 ipad learning design learning objects mac os microsoft office multimedia operating system photoshop podcast portal portfolio research safari screencast software standards usb video vle web 2.0 web resources wiki windows youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1585 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk What Is a URI and Why Does It Matter? http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/thompson-hs#author1">Henry S. Thompson</a> describes how recent developments in Web technology have affected the relationship between URI and resource representation and the related consequences.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>URI stands for Uniform Resource Identifier, the official name for those things you see all the time on the Web that begin <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'http:'</font> or <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'mailto:'</font>, for example <span class="style1">http://<em>www.w3.org</em>/</span>, which is the URI for the home page of the World Wide Web Consortium [<a href="#1">1</a>]. (These things were called URLs (Uniform Resource Locators) in the early days of the Web, and the change from URL to URI is either hugely significant or completely irrelevant, depending on who is talking—I have nothing to say about this issue in this article. If you have never heard of URIs (or IRIs, the even more recent fully internationalised version), but are familiar with URLs, just think 'URL' whenever you see 'URI' below.)</p> <p>Historically, URIs were mostly seen as simply the way you accessed Web pages. These pages were hand-authored, relatively stable and simply shipped out on demand. More and more often that is no longer the case; in at least three different ways:</p> <ul> <li>Web pages for reading have been complemented by pictures for viewing, videos for watching and music for listening;</li> <li>The Web is now more than a conduit for information, it is a means to a variety of ends; we use it to <em>do</em> things: purchase goods and services, contribute to forums, play games;</li> <li>The things we access on the Web are often not hand-authored or stable, but are automatically synthesised from 'deeper' data sources on demand. Furthermore, that synthesis is increasingly influenced by aspects of the way we initiate the access.</li> </ul> <p>It is against this background that I think it is worth exploring with some care what URIs were meant to be, and how they are being used in practice. In particular, I want to look at what is to be gained from a better understanding of how other kinds of identifiers work.</p> <h2 id="The_Official_Version">The Official Version</h2> <p>Insofar as there are definitive documents about all this, they all agree that URIs are, as the third initial says, <strong>identifiers</strong>, that is, names. They identify <strong>resources</strong>, and often (although not always) allow you to access <strong>representations</strong> of those resources. (Words in <strong>bold</strong> are used as technical terms—their ordinary language meaning is in many cases likely to be more confusing than helpful.)</p> <p>'Resource' names a role in a story, not an intrinsically distinguishable subset of things, just as 'referent' does in ordinary language. Things are resources because someone created a URI to identify them, not because they have some particular properties in and of themselves.</p> <p>'Representation' names a pair: a character sequence and a media type. The <strong>media type</strong> specifies how the character string should be interpreted. For example JPG or HTML or MP3 would be likely media types for representations of an image of an apple, a news report about an orchard or a recording of a Beatles song, respectively.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article henry s. thompson apple google ietf university of edinburgh w3c wikipedia aggregation ajax algorithm browser cataloguing cookie data framework gif google maps html hypertext identifier javascript jpg metadata mp3 png rfc search technology semantic web uri url web 2.0 web app xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1589 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Developing Infrastructure for Research Data Management at the University of Oxford http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author1">James A. J. Wilson</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author2">Michael A. Fraser</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author3">Luis Martinez-Uribe</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author4">Paul Jeffreys</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author5">Meriel Patrick</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author6">Asif Akram</a> and <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author7">Tahir Mansoori</a> describe the approaches taken, findings, and issues encountered while developing research data management services and infrastructure at the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><p>The University of Oxford began to consider research data management infrastructure in earnest in 2008, with the 'Scoping Digital Repository Services for Research Data' Project [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Two further JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee)-funded pilot projects followed this initial study, and the approaches taken by these projects, and their findings, form the bulk of this article.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article asif akram james a. j. wilson luis martinez-uribe meriel patrick michael a. fraser paul jeffreys tahir mansoori ahds dcc google hefce ibm jisc microsoft oxford university computing services research information network uk data archive university of east anglia university of essex university of melbourne university of oxford university of southampton datashare eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih algorithm archives bibliographic data browser cloud computing curation data data management data set database digital asset management digital curation digital repositories e-research flash framework geospatial data gis google maps ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service intellectual property interoperability j2ee jpeg metadata multimedia open access portal preservation provenance qt repositories research research information management schema search technology sharepoint software standards visualisation web 2.0 web portal xml xml schema Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1590 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Internet Librarian International Conference 2010 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author1">Claire Tylee</a>, <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author2">Katrin Flemming</a> and <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author3">Elly Cope</a> report on the two-day Internet Librarian International Conference focusing on innovation and technology in the information profession, held in London on 14-15 October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc1"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Thursday_14_October">Thursday 14 October</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value">Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><h2 id="Thursday_14_October"><a id="thursday" name="thursday"></a>Thursday 14 October</h2> <h2 id="Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value"><a id="thursday-track-a" name="thursday-track-a"></a>Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</h2> <h3 id="A102:_Future_of_Academic_Libraries"><a id="a102" name="a102"></a>A102: Future of Academic Libraries</h3> <h4 id="Mal_Booth_University_of_Technology_Sydney_Australia">Mal Booth, University of Technology Sydney (Australia)</h4> <h4 id="Michael_Jubb_Research_Information_Network_UK">Michael Jubb, Research Information Network (UK)</h4> <p>Mal Booth from the University of Technology Sydney started the session by giving an insight into current plans and projects underway to inform a new library building due to open in 2015 as part of a major redeveloped city campus.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report claire tylee elly cope katrin flemming amazon british library cornell university edina google iso jisc mimas open university portico research information network university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of manchester peprs wikipedia zetoc android archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing content management copyright curation data database digital library digitisation dissemination ejournal facebook flickr frbr higher education identifier infrastructure iphone library data library management systems licence linked data mac os marc mashup metadata microblogging mobile opac open access open source pode preservation qr code research rfid rss search technology semantic web software standards tagging twitter video web 2.0 web browser web portal wiki wordpress youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1596 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Trove: Innovation in Access to Information in Australia http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/holley#author1">Rose Holley</a> describes a major development in the Australian national digital information infrastructure.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In late 2009 the National Library of Australia released version 1 of Trove [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the public. Trove is a free search engine. It searches across a large aggregation of Australian content. The treasure is over 90 million items from over 1000 libraries, museums, archives and other organisations which can be found at the click of a button. Finding information just got easier for many Australians. Exploring a wealth of resources and digital content like never before, including full-text books, journals and newspaper articles, images, music, sound, video, maps, Web sites, diaries, letters, archives, people and organisations has been an exciting adventure for users and the service has been heavily used. Finding and retrieving instantly information in context; interacting with content and social engagement are core features of the service. This article describes Trove features, usage, content building, and its applications for contributors and users in the national context.</p> <h2 id="Opportunities_for_Libraries">Opportunities for Libraries</h2> <p>I see tremendous opportunities for libraries this year because of advances in technology. The changes in technology mean that anyone can create, describe or recommend content, which means that many people and organisations are becoming librarians or libraries in their own way. Librarians should not be threatened or dismayed by this but rather encouraged, since it means that society is retaining its ongoing interest in the creation, organisation and dissemination of content, and we have an integral role to play in these developments. Libraries and librarians are relevant more than ever in this environment because we have vast amounts of data and information to share, a huge amount of information expertise, and an understanding of how technology can assist us in making information more accessible.</p> <p>We need to have new ideas and re-examine our old ideas to see how technology can help us. What things have we always wanted to do that we couldn't before, like providing a single point of access to all Australian information? Is this still pie in the sky or can we now achieve it? Libraries need to think big. As Charles Leadbeater would say 'Libraries need to think they are leading a mass movement, not just serving a clientele.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] Librarians are often thought of as gatekeepers with the emphasis being on closed access, but technology enables gatekeepers to open doors as well as close them and this is the opportunity I see. However many institutions will need to change their strategic thinking from control/shut to free/open before they can make this transition, and take a large dose of courage as well. The American author Harriet Rubin says, 'Freedom is actually a bigger game than power. Power is about what you can control. Freedom is about what you can unleash.' [<a href="#3">3</a>] The National Library of Australia already took this step forward in 2008 with the advent of the Australian Newspapers beta service, which opened up the raw text of digitised Australian newspapers to the public for improvement, without moderation on a mass scale [<a href="#4">4</a>]. With a long history of collaboration across the Australian cultural heritage sector [<a href="#5">5</a>] with regard to digitisation, storage, and service delivery, the National Library of Australia is well placed to take the lead with innovation in access to information.</p> <p>Some people may say, 'But isn't Google doing that, so why do we still need libraries?' There is no question in my mind that libraries are fundamentally different from Google and other similar services. Libraries are different to Google for these reasons: they commit to provide long-term preservation, curation and access to their content; they have no commercial motives in the provision of information (deemed by various library acts); they aim for universal access to everyone in society; and they are 'free for all'. To summarise: libraries are always and forever. Who can say that of a search engine, or of any commercial organisation, regardless of size?</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article rose holley amazon british library google national library of australia oai open library wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data bibliographic database browser copyright curation data database digitisation dissemination doc dublin core facebook flickr ftp google books identifier infrastructure lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh ocr open archives initiative persistent identifier preservation research resource sharing rss search technology tagging twitter usability video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1563 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Web Management Workshop 2010 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt#author1">Keith Doyle</a> provides a personal perspective on a conference organised by UKOLN for those involved in the provision of institutional Web services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This was the 13th Institutional Web Management Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] to be organised by UKOLN [<a href="#2">2</a>] held at the University of Sheffield from 12 to 14 July 2010.&nbsp;The theme was 'The Web in Turbulent Times' [<a href="#3">3</a>]. As such, there was a healthy balance of glass-half-empty-doom-and-gloom, and glass-half-full-yes-we-can.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report keith doyle canterbury christ church university eduserv google ilrt oxford university computing services terminalfour ukoln university college london university of bristol university of cambridge university of oxford university of salford university of sheffield university of the west of england w3c iwmw memento mobile campus assistant wikipedia accessibility apache blog browser cocoa content management css curation data data visualisation datamining facebook firefox framework geospatial data gis hashtag higher education html html5 hypertext information architecture linked data mashup metadata mobile mobile phone opera plone portal qr code rdfa research rss search technology sharepoint smartphone social web software taxonomy twitter usability video videoconferencing visualisation web app web development web services webkit widget wookie wordpress xcri xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1569 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2010: The Mobile University http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt#author1">Shailey Minocha</a> reflects on the one-day symposium organised by Eduserv in May 2010. The aim of the event was to discuss whether and how mobile technology will play a significant role in the delivery of UK Higher Education in the future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report shailey minocha blackboard canterbury christ church university edge hill university eduserv google massachusetts institute of technology open university oucs ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of edinburgh university of oxford university of plymouth university of sheffield university of wolverhampton itunes u accessibility ajax android augmented reality blog browser cataloguing cloud computing data e-learning facebook framework higher education html html5 infrastructure ipad iphone itunes junaio location-based services mobile mobile learning mobile phone open source operating system podcast qr code research search technology smartphone sms social software software twitter url usability video web 2.0 web services webkit wiki wikitude wireless Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1573 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Making Datasets Visible and Accessible: DataCite's First Summer Meeting http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt#author1">Tom J Pollard</a> and <a href="/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt#author2">J Max Wilkinson</a> report on DataCite's First Summer Meeting, a two-day event focused on making datasets visible and accessible, held in Hannover, Germany, in June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report j max wilkinson tom pollard british library datacite elsevier harvard university microsoft open planets foundation university of the west of england ddi archives blog browser cataloguing copyright creative commons curation data data citation data management data mining data set digital repositories doi e-research facebook foi framework graphics infrastructure interoperability java mashup metadata open access open source portal privacy repositories research search technology standards syndication visualisation vocabularies Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1574 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries (emtacl10) http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/emtacl10-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/emtacl10-rpt#author1">Andrew Walsh</a> reports on a new international conference on emerging technologies within academic libraries organised by the library of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and held in Trondheim, Norway in April 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/emtacl10-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report andrew walsh amazon google heriot-watt university oclc talis university of huddersfield university of nottingham journaltocs api blog browser cataloguing cloud computing data database facebook google books google docs google scholar infrastructure internet explorer library management systems linked data mashup mobile mp4 open data portal repositories research rss search technology semantic web sms social networks software video web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1576 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: iPad - The Missing Manual http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a manual to help support your use of an iPad - 'the book that should have been in the box'.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Missing Manual Series, originally written and published by David Pogue has expanded and is now published by O'Reilly, who deal mainly with computer books. Like many other publishers, they have jumped on the 'ibandwagon'. A quick count on Amazon Books gave a dozen similar offerings (excluding developers' guides).</p> <p>This is a review therefore of just one of these paperbacks, and is not a comparative review – with one exception which I shall come to below.</p> <h2 id="Comments">Comments</h2> <p>For writing this review I settled down with the IPad on my knee, Bluetooth keyboard below that and glass of chenin blanc at my right hand – but wondered where to place the volume under review. As yet, nobody has produced a 'skyhook' to hold one or the other. <em>IPad: The Missing Manual (<em>MM</em>)</em> is a little smaller than the iPad itself, about as thick and uses glossy paper with colour illustrations on most pages. In general, each page has a new topic and is organised by basic chapters. <em>Get to know your iPad, Interact with your iPad</em>, etc. They are logical and you can easily flick between them to find the section you need. Not that, with an iPad, you really need to find much. Just plug in applications (apps) and play to find your own way around. This, of course, is typical for Macs of whatever kind. With the iPad however, there is less freedom to find new ways of doing things than with the usual Linux-based Mac OS. The main difficulty is to link up with a computer; fire up iTunes and use this to get started. The basic leaflet that comes with the iPad will tell you all this. Even if you have not used a Mac before, it is fairly intuitive. If you are unsure about the basic operations and included apps, the Apple Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>] gives some short, but informative videos. The Missing Manual elaborates on them. If you have not used an iPhone, or perhaps an IPod before, then the <em>MM</em> helps a bit. If you want to do something, for example, move around the icons of apps on the screen and you don't know what to do, then a brief incursion to the <em>MM</em> is undoubtedly helpful. There is a substantial index to help matters but you may well have picked up the basics from Apple's video tours.</p> <p>At this stage I wanted a 'top up' and went into the kitchen, but I also did an experiment. The weight of iPad on the kitchen scales was 856g; weight of the <em>MM</em> was 427g, ratio, almost exactly 2:1. By a volumetric comparison this is approximately 1: 0.8. The <em>MM</em> is by no means small, so what about information content per volume or mass? Here is another experiment if you have just bought an iPad. First, download the app <em>iCabMobile</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>], this is another browser that can be used instead of, and is rather better than, the bundled Safari. Now download the app <em>GoodReader</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] and then into the browser type: manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/iPad_User_Guide.pdf [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Lo and behold you have the 'true' missing manual from Apple. Now, in the browser, insert the letter g before http:// of the target URL of the pdf and press 'return'. This downloads the iPad_User_Guide pdf into <em>GoodReader</em>. It is 19MB but should come down easily. You can then browse Apple's free manual in <em>GoodReader</em> as an e-book.</p> <p>Steve Jobs boasts that there are 8,500 apps for the iPad [<a href="#5">5</a>] but which ones are necessary for your Personal Learning Environment? Well, this review (via <em>MacUser</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], thank you) suggests two very good ones. <em>GoodReader</em> is excellent, you can leaf through the pdf as a book, search it, and so on, so put all your downloaded pdfs there. If you do not use <em>Mobile Me</em> [<a href="#7">7</a>] and if you want to get hold of a pdf (or other) file from your office machine, then use<em> Dropbox</em> [<a href="#8">8</a>] for your office machine and iPad. Upload it in the office and download it to your iPad at leisure. Some apps are mentioned at various places in the <em>MM</em>, but of course more are added all the time so a print-on-paper book is not a good venue for them.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review brian whalley amazon apple oreilly queens university belfast browser ebook ipad iphone itunes linux mac os mobile safari search technology video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1582 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Mobilising the Internet Detective http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/massam-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/massam-et-al#author1">Diana Massam</a>, <a href="/issue63/massam-et-al#author2">Andrew Priest</a> and <a href="/issue63/massam-et-al#author3">Caroline Williams</a> describe a recent project to adapt the online Internet Detective tutorial, to deliver a user-friendly mobile site which reflects their market research into user preferences for mobile content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'The mobile phone is undoubtedly [a] strong driving force, a behaviour changer…Library users will soon be demanding that every interaction can take place via the cell phone' [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/massam-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article andrew priest caroline williams diana massam apple google intute jisc mimas ukoln university of manchester w3c devcsi jisc information environment mobile internet detective transcoder accessibility aggregation android blog browser css data e-learning facebook google docs higher education information architecture ipad iphone java linked data mobi mobile mobile learning mobile phone mp3 open source opera php podcast programming language repositories research search technology sms software stylesheet video web development wireless Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1540 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Volcanic Eruptions Fail to Thwart Digital Preservation - the Planets Way http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author1">Matthew Barr</a>, <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author2">Amir Bernstein</a>, <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author3">Clive Billenness</a> and <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author4">Manfred Thaller</a> report on the final Planets training event Digital Preservation - The Planets Way held in Rome over 19 - 21 April 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div align="center"> <p style="text-align: left;">In far more dramatic circumstances than expected, the Planets Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] held its 3-day training event<em> Digital Preservation – The Planets Way</em> in Rome over 19 - 21 April 2010. This article reports its proceedings.</p> </div><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report amir bernstein clive billenness manfred thaller matthew barr austrian national library british library national library of the netherlands oais open planets foundation opf swiss federal archives university of cologne university of glasgow archives bibliographic data browser cataloguing cloud computing data database digital preservation digital repositories digitisation file format framework graphics identifier interoperability java metadata national library operating system preservation repositories research software usb visualisation web browser web services xml youtube zip Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1549 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Library Mashups http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/lyngdoh-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/lyngdoh-rvw#author1">Aldalin Lyngdoh</a> reviews a book on the basics of mashups and how they have been used in libraries worldwide.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This book is intended for readers who have some knowledge of computers, computer programming and libraries.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/lyngdoh-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review aldalin lyngdoh british medical association google api browser cataloguing computer programming data database flickr google maps library data mashup opac repositories search technology web 2.0 web services yahoo pipes Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1556 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Targets: Web Preservation and Reference Management http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/davis <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/davis#author1">Richard Davis</a> discusses the role of Web preservation in reference management. This article is based on a presentation given at the Innovations in Reference Management workshop, January 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3: amended in light of author's further final-read revisions 2010-02-12-11-11 rew --><!-- v3: amended in light of author's further final-read revisions 2010-02-12-11-11 rew --><p>It seems fair to say that the lion's share of work on developing online tools for reference and citation management by students and researchers has focused on familiar types of publication. They generally comprise resources that can be neatly and discretely bound in the covers of a book or journal, or their electronic analogues, like the Portable Document Format (PDF): objects in established library or database systems, with ISBNs and ISSNs underwritten by the authority of formal publication and legal deposit.</p> <p>Yet, increasingly, native Web resources are also becoming eminently citable, and managing both the resources, and references to them, is an ongoing challenge. Moreover, the issues associated with referencing this kind of material have received comparatively little attention, beyond introducing the convention that includes the URL and the date it was accessed in bibliographies. While it may be hard to quantify the "average lifespan of a web page" [<a href="#1">1</a>], what is undeniable is that Web resources are highly volatile and prone to deletion or amendment without warning.</p> <p>Web Preservation is one field of endeavour which attempts to counter the Web's transient tendency, and a variety of approaches continue to be explored. The aim of this article is to convey the fairly simple message that many themes and concerns of Web preservation are equally relevant in the quest for effective reference management in academic research, particularly given the rate at which our dependence on Web-delivered resources is growing.</p> <p>Digital preservation is, naturally, a strong theme in the work of the University of London Computer Centre (ULCC)'s Digital Archives Department, and Web preservation has featured particularly strongly in recent years. This article will draw upon several initiatives with which we have been involved recently. These include: the 2008 JISC Preservation of Web Resources Project (JISC-PoWR) [<a href="#2">2</a>], on which we worked with Brian Kelly and Marieke Guy of UKOLN; our work for the UK Web Archiving Consortium; and the ongoing JISC ArchivePress Project [<a href="#3">3</a>] (itself, in many ways, a sequel to JISC-PoWR).</p> <p>Another perspective that I bring is as a part-time student myself, on the MSc E-Learning programme at Edinburgh University. As a consequence I have papers to read, and write, and a dissertation imminent. So for this reason too I have a stake in making it easier to keep track of information for reading lists, footnotes and bibliographies, whether with desktop tools or Web-based tools, or through features in online VLEs, databases and repositories.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/davis" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article richard davis british library dcc digital preservation coalition google intute jisc leiden university the national archives ukoln university of edinburgh university of london wellcome trust internet archive jisc information environment powr wikipedia archives atom blog browser cache content management cool uri copyright data database digital archive digital curation digital preservation document format e-learning framework higher education identifier metadata open access open source preservation repositories research rss standards ulcc uri url wayback machine web 2.0 web app web resources web standards wiki wordpress Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1523 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Abstract Modelling of Digital Identifiers http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/nicholas-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/nicholas-et-al#author1">Nick Nicholas</a>, <a href="/issue62/nicholas-et-al#author2">Nigel Ward</a> and <a href="/issue62/nicholas-et-al#author3">Kerry Blinco</a> present an information model of digital identifiers, to help bring clarity to the vocabulary debates from which this field has suffered.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2, incorporating author review edits inc. lead-ins to bullet lists - 2010-02-12-19-30-rew--><!-- v2, incorporating author review edits inc. lead-ins to bullet lists - 2010-02-12-19-30-rew--><p>Discussion of digital identifiers, and persistent identifiers in particular, has often been confused by differences in underlying assumptions and approaches. To bring more clarity to such discussions, the PILIN Project has devised an abstract model of identifiers and identifier services, which is presented here in summary. Given such an abstract model, it is possible to compare different identifier schemes, despite variations in terminology; and policies and strategies can be formulated for persistence without committing to particular systems. The abstract model is formal and layered; in this article, we give an overview of the distinctions made in the model. This presentation is not exhaustive, but it presents some of the key concepts represented, and some of the insights that result.</p> <p>The main goal of the Persistent Identifier Linking Infrastructure (PILIN) project [<a href="#1">1</a>] has been to scope the infrastructure necessary for a national persistent identifier service. There are a variety of approaches and technologies already on offer for persistent digital identification of objects. But true identity persistence cannot be bound to particular technologies, domain policies, or information models: any formulation of a persistent identifier strategy needs to outlast current technologies, if the identifiers are to remain persistent in the long term.</p> <p>For that reason, PILIN has modelled the digital identifier space in the abstract. It has arrived at an ontology [<a href="#2">2</a>] and a service model [<a href="#3">3</a>] for digital identifiers, and for how they are used and managed, building on previous work in the identifier field [<a href="#4">4</a>] (including the thinking behind URI [<a href="#5">5</a>], DOI [<a href="#6">6</a>], XRI [<a href="#7">7</a>] and ARK [<a href="#8">8</a>]), as well as semiotic theory [<a href="#9">9</a>]. The ontology, as an abstract model, addresses the question 'what is (and isn't) an identifier?' and 'what does an identifier management system do?'. This more abstract view also brings clarity to the ongoing conversation of whether URIs can be (and should be) universal persistent identifiers.</p> <h2 id="Identifier_Model">Identifier Model</h2> <p>For the identifier model to be abstract, it cannot commit to a particular information model. The notion of an identifier depends crucially on the understanding that an identifier only identifies one distinct thing. But different domains will have different understandings of what things are distinct from each other, and what can legitimately count as a single thing. (This includes aggregations of objects, and different versions or snapshots of objects.) In order for the abstract identifier model to be applicable to all those domains, it cannot impose its own definitions of what things are distinct: it must rely on the distinctions specific to the domain.</p> <p>This means that information modelling is a critical prerequisite to introducing identifiers to a domain, as we discuss elsewhere [<a href="#10">10</a>]: identifier users should be able to tell whether any changes in a thing's content, presentation, or location mean it is no longer identified by the same identifier (i.e. whether the identifier is restricted to a particular version, format, or copy).</p> <p>The abstract identifier model also cannot commit to any particular protocols or service models. In fact, the abstract identifier model should not even presume the Internet as a medium. A sufficiently abstract model of identifiers should apply just as much to URLs as it does to ISBNs, or names of sheep; the model should not be inherently digital, in order to avoid restricting our understanding of identifiers to the current state of digital technologies. This means that our model of identifiers comes close to the understanding in semiotics of signs, as our definitions below make clear.</p> <p>There are two important distinctions between digital identifiers and other signs which we needed to capture. First, identifiers are managed through some system, in order to guarantee the stability of certain properties of the identifier. This is different to other signs, whose meaning is constantly renegotiated in a community. Those identifier properties requiring guarantees include the accountability and persistence of various facets of the identifier—most crucially, what is being identified. For digital identifiers, the <strong>identifier management system</strong> involves registries, accessed through defined services. An HTTP server, a PURL [<a href="#11">11</a>] registry, and an XRI registry are all instances of identifier management systems.</p> <p>Second, digital identifiers are straightforwardly <strong>actionable</strong>: actions can be made to happen in connection with the identifier. Those actions involve interacting with computers, rather than other people: the computer consistently does what the system specifies is to be done with the identifier, and has no latitude for subjective interpretation. This is in contrast with human language, which can involve complex processes of interpretation, and where there can be considerable disconnect between what a speaker intends and how a listener reacts. Because the interactions involved are much simpler, the model can concentrate on two actions which are core to digital identifiers, but which are only part of the picture in human communication: working out what is being identified (<em>resolution</em>), and accessing a representation of what is identified (<em>retrieval</em>).</p> <p>So to model managing and acting on digital identifiers, we need a concept of things that can be identified, names for things, and the relations between them. (Semiotics already gives us such concepts.) We also need a model of the systems through which identifiers are managed and acted on; what those systems do, and who requests them to do so; and what aspects of identifiers the systems manage.</p> <p>Our identifier model (as an ontology) thus encompasses:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Entities</strong> - including actors and identifier systems;</li> <li><strong>Relations</strong> between entities;</li> <li><strong>Qualities</strong>, as desirable properties of entities. Actions are typically undertaken in order to make qualities apply to entities.</li> <li><strong>Actions</strong>, as the processes carried out on entities (and corresponding to <strong>services</strong> in implementations);</li> </ul> <p>An individual identifier system can be modelled using concepts from the ontology, with an identifier system model.</p> <p>In the remainder of this article, we go through the various concepts introduced in the model under these classes. We present the concept definitions under each section, before discussing issues that arise out of them. <em>Resolution</em> and <em>Retrieval</em> are crucial actions for identifiers, whose definition involves distinct issues; they are discussed separately from other Actions. We briefly discuss the standing of HTTP URIs in the model at the end.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/nicholas-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article kerry blinco nick nicholas nigel ward d-lib magazine dest ietf oasis internet archive aggregation archives ark ascii browser cataloguing cool uri cordra curation data database digital object identifier dns document management doi e-learning ftp identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects metadata mobile mobile phone namespace ontologies openurl persistent identifier purl repositories research rfc search technology semantic web semiotic service usage model uri url vocabularies wayback machine web browser xml xml namespaces Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1528 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk How to Publish Data Using Overlay Journals: The OJIMS Project http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/callaghan-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author1">Sarah Callaghan</a>, <a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author2">Sam Pepler</a>, <a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author3">Fiona Hewer</a>, <a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author4">Paul Hardaker</a> and <a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author5">Alan Gadian</a> describe the implementation details that can be used to create overlay journals for data publishing in the meteorological sciences.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The previous article about the Overlay Journal Infrastructure for Meteorological Sciences (OJIMS) Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] dealt with an introduction to the concept of overlay journals and their potential impact on the meteorological sciences. It also discussed the business cases and requirements that must be met for overlay journals to become operational as data publications.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/callaghan-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article alan gadian fiona hewer paul hardaker sam pepler sarah callaghan badc jisc ncas oai royal meteorological society university of leeds ojims opendoar rioja sneep archives browser copyright data data management data set database dissemination dublin core eprints flickr framework identifier infrastructure metadata oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source podcast preservation programming language python rdf repositories research schema search technology software standards video web app web browser wiki xml xml schema xslt Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1508 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Live Blogging @ IWMW 2009 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/iwmw-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/iwmw-2009-rpt#author1">Kirsty McGill</a> provides a live blogger perspective on the three-day Institutional Web Managers Workshop, held by UKOLN at the University of Essex, Colchester, in July 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 12th annual Institutional Web Managers Workshop (IWMW) attracted nearly 200 delegates, making it the largest workshop in the event's history. Whilst the popularity of the physical event has grown, so too has the remote audience. So this year organisers Marieke Guy and Brian Kelly decided that it was time to start treating this remote audience as first class citizens.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/iwmw-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 event report kirsty pitkin amazon bbc cardiff university edge hill university google jisc ukoln university of essex university of glasgow university of southampton university of strathclyde devcsi iwmw accessibility ajax amazon web services api blog browser cloud computing content management css curation data database domain model e-learning facebook flickr html interoperability javascript metadata mobile netvibes photoshop preservation privacy research schema social web software streaming twitter uri video web 2.0 web development web resources web services wireframe Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1515 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The Second International M-Libraries Conference http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/m-libraries-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/m-libraries-2009-rpt#author1">Keren Mills</a> reports on a two-day conference exploring and sharing delivery of services and resources to users 'on the move,' via mobile and hand-held devices.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Jointly hosted by the University of British Columbia (UBC), Athabasca University, the UK Open University (OU) and Thomson Rivers University, the conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held on UBC's beautiful campus in Vancouver and covered a broad range of topics, from SMS reference to using QR codes.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/m-libraries-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 event report keren mills bbc coalition for networked information liverpool john moores university microsoft oclc open university university of bath university of cambridge yale university blog browser cataloguing cloud computing ebook ejournal javascript learning objects mobile mobile learning mobile phone mp3 multimedia open source podcast qr code research sms software tagging twitter url Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1495 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Content Architecture: Exploiting and Managing Diverse Resources http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/isko-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/isko-2009-rpt#author1">Jane Stevenson</a> gives a personal view of the recent UK conference organised by the International Society of Knowledge Organization.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/isko-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 event report jane stevenson bbc coalition for networked information google microsoft mimas oracle university college london university of cambridge university of manchester archives hub dbpedia wikipedia algorithm api archives browser cloud computing controlled vocabularies data data set database digitisation e-research framework identifier infrastructure infrastructure as a service knowledge base linked data lod metadata microsoft office multimedia ontologies open data rdf research resource description search technology semantic web software uri vocabularies wordpress xml Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1499 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The REMAP Project: Steps Towards a Repository-enabled Information Environment http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/green-awre <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/green-awre#author1">Richard Green</a> and <a href="/issue59/green-awre#author2">Chris Awre</a> investigate what role a repository can play in enabling and supporting the management and preservation of its own digital content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 2 following receipt of authorial byline : REW --><!-- version 2 following receipt of authorial byline : REW --><p>This article describes the recently completed REMAP Project undertaken at the University of Hull, which has been a key step toward realising a larger vision of the role a repository can play in supporting digital content management for an institution. The first step was the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC)-funded RepoMMan Project that the team undertook between 2005 and 2007 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/green-awre" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article chris awre richard green glasgow caledonian university harvard university jisc kings college london stanford university the national archives university of hull university of virginia clif hydra jisc information environment remap project repomman archives browser content management data digital preservation doc droid dublin core fedora commons framework information architecture institutional repository metadata mods preservation repositories rss schema search technology software standards tiff url web services Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1466 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk To VRE Or Not to VRE?: Do South African Malaria Researchers Need a Virtual Research Environment? http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer#author1">Heila Pienaar</a> and <a href="/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer#author2">Martie van Deventer</a> identify the requirements of a Virtual Research Environment (VRE) for malaria researchers in South Africa.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 4: 200906051150 to accommodate final table correction and fuller conclusion; awaitng ref 12 content-REW --><!-- version 4: 200906051150 to accommodate final table correction and fuller conclusion; awaitng ref 12 content-REW --><p>Worldwide, the research paradigm is in the process of expanding into eResearch and open scholarship. This implies new ways of collaboration, dissemination and reuse of research results, specifically via the Web. Developing countries are also able to exploit the opportunity to make their knowledge output more widely known and accessible and to co-operate in research partnerships.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article heila pienaar martie van deventer british library google jisc microsoft university of oxford university of pretoria bvreh ibvre mrc myexperiment algorithm blog browser curation data data management data set database dissemination document management e-learning e-research e-science framework google scholar graphics identifier infrastructure intellectual property java knowledge management ms word open source passwords portal portfolio repositories research search technology social networks software video virtual research environment web 2.0 wiki Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1469 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Get Tooled Up: Staying Connected: Technologies Supporting Remote Workers http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/guy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Having considered organisational issues in her previous article, <a href="/issue57/guy#author1">Marieke Guy</a> takes a look at the many technologies that support remote working, from broadband to Web 2.0 social networking tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/guy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article marieke guy bbc google jisc microsoft ukoln university of aberdeen university of bath university of london internet archive powr wikipedia adobe archives authentication blog browser data database dissemination e-learning eportfolio facebook flickr google docs higher education infrastructure jabber microblogging mobile mobile phone mp3 multimedia operating system passwords podcast portfolio preservation remote working repositories research search technology smartphone social networks software standards streaming twitter usability video videoconferencing web 2.0 web app web development web resources wiki windows wireless wordpress youtube Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1430 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk