Overview of content related to 'sconul' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/13693/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Implementing a Resource or Reading List Management System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/brewerton <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/brewerton#author1">Gary Brewerton</a> takes us step by step through the various stages of implementing a Resource or Reading List Management System for your institution.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article takes you step by step through the various stages of implementing a Resource or Reading List Management System; from writing the business case to involving stakeholders, selecting a system, implementation planning, advocacy, training and data entry. It recognises the hard work required to embed such a system into your institution both during the implementation process and beyond.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/brewerton" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up gary brewerton loughborough university sconul authentication blog cataloguing data e-learning freemium higher education intellectual property internet explorer ldap library management systems mooc open source podcast shibboleth software standards vle Mon, 17 Jun 2013 18:35:26 +0000 lisrw 2448 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The New Digital Scholar - Exploring and Enriching the Research and Writing Practices of NextGen Students http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/robinson-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/robinson-rvw#author1">Julia Robinson</a> reviews a substantial and timely collection of essays related to the research and writing practices of NextGen students. Expressing a call for change in the way educators approach Information Literacy teaching, this book invites the reader to redefine, re-evaluate and reflect on what we think we know about students’ research practices today.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>McClure and Purdy bring together a mix of perspectives, from librarians and lecturers to professors and programmers, to give voice to the very timely concern in Information Literacy (IL) teaching, that we are not equipping our students for the future as we hoped. So-called NextGen students are engaging with information online in their personal, social and educational lives in ways that are shaping new approaches to and conceptions of research. At the same time, those teaching IL, whether librarians or writing instructors, are basing lesson plans and interventions on traditional pedagogies, arguably unfit for a research landscape so altered by the pace and change of information technologies. Students, IL instructors and academics occupy different spaces in the digital environment and work at cross-purposes. Traditional IL instruction has encouraged students to understand information sources in binary terms, right or wrong, leaving them disoriented and disengaged as they undertake research. Students should instead be encouraged to see research as a recursive conversation. IL instructors need to collaborate with academics to reposition themselves in this conversation and join students in their digital space at the point of need.</p> <h2 id="Structure_and_Content">Structure and Content</h2> <p>The book is divided into four parts and sixteen chapters (see <a href="#appendix">Appendix</a> for full Table of Contents). In the introduction ‘Understanding the NextGen Researcher’, McClure and Purdy set out their premise that NextGen students are prolific writers, readers and researchers, using a multitude of digital technologies to engage in these activities simultaneously, and:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><em>Because digital technologies intertwine research and writing, this book takes as its premise that we – as professionals from a variety of fields – cannot ignore, marginalize </em>(sic)<em>, or leave to others the commitment to understand and help the new digital scholar. In its four parts, this collection explores the facets of that commitment.</em> (p.2)</p> <p>Part One: NextGen Students and the Research Writing ‘Problem’ moves through defining <em>Information Behaviour</em> (Chapter 1), giving a history of the research paper (Chapter 2), identifying key IL frameworks (Chapter 3) and introducing <em>deep learning</em> (Chapter 4). All of these chapters set the scene by providing a broad theoretical basis and shared language with which the reader can access the rest of the book.</p> <p>Most interestingly, McClure defines <em>Information Behaviour</em> as separate and distinct from Information Literacy. He bases his argument on the American Library Association definition of IL, where information-literate people ‘recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information’ [<a href="#1">1</a>]. However, he reframes the ALA’s definition, instead describing it as:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><strong><em>A set of abilities requiring individuals to</em></strong> (my emphasis)<em> recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.</em> (p.20)</p> <p>McClure goes on to argue that if IL is a finite set of skills or abilities then <em>Information Behaviour </em>‘is concerned with the complex processes and influences on the information seeker’ (p.20). Whilst his intention to highlight behaviour is laudable, he adapts the definition of IL to make his point. Indeed, many readers in the UK would see a focus on behaviour and influence as inherent to IL, and already accounted for within the term. For example, the SCONUL Seven Pillars Model of Information Literacy states that:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><em>Information literate people will demonstrate an awareness of how they gather, use, manage, synthesise and create information and data in an ethical manner and will have the information skills to do so effectively.</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>]</p> <p>Information skills are separate here too, but they are part of IL, they do not constitute IL itself. The focus on how accounts for behaviour. Conceptions of IL are detailed and discussed throughout the book along with related but distinct terms such as <em>Digital Literacy</em>,<em> Multiliteracies</em> (both Chapter 7), <em>Digital Agency</em> (Chapter 9), <em>Hyperliteracy</em> (Chapter 13) and <em>Technological Literacy</em> (Chapter 16).</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/robinson-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review julia robinson american library association google newcastle university sconul born digital copyright data database framework open access research search technology usability Sat, 06 Jul 2013 20:34:48 +0000 lisrw 2472 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Upskilling Liaison Librarians for Research Data Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/cox-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author1">Andrew Cox</a>, <a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author2">Eddy Verbaan</a> and <a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author3">Barbara Sen</a> explore the design of a curriculum to train academic librarians in the competencies to support Research Data Management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For many UK HEIs, especially research-intensive institutions, Research Data Management (RDM) is rising rapidly up the agenda. Working closely with other professional services, and with researchers themselves, libraries will probably have a key role to play in supporting RDM. This role might include signposting institutional expertise in RDM; inclusion of the topic in information literacy sessions for PhD students and other researchers; advocacy for open data sharing; or contributing to the management of an institutional data repository.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/cox-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article andrew cox barbara sen eddy verbaan dcc jisc northumbria university sconul uk data archive university of essex university of sheffield datum for health rdmrose archives bibliographic data bibliometrics cataloguing copyright curation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital library e-research e-science framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository knowledge base knowledge management licence metadata open access open data open education preservation repositories research software web portal Thu, 06 Dec 2012 19:27:43 +0000 lisrw 2402 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Walk-in Access to e-Resources at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author1">Kate Robinson</a>, <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author2">Lizz Jennings</a> and <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author3">Laurence Lockton</a> outline a low-cost solution to walk-in (visitor) access to licensed e-journals, drawing on their practice at the University of Bath with a wiki ERM and OPAC terminals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Although the move from print to electronic journals over the last two decades has been enormously beneficial to academic libraries and their users, the shift from owning material outright to renting access has restricted the autonomy of librarians to grant access to these journals.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>Licence restrictions imposed by publishers define and limit access rights and librarians have increasingly taken on the role of restricting access on behalf of the publisher, rather than granting access on behalf of their institution.&nbsp; In other words, librarians and their institutions are no longer free to decide who may read this material as they no longer own it.&nbsp;</p> <p>This situation has been the subject of negotiation for some time, and it is fair to say that an accommodation has been reached in many cases through less restrictive licensing terms.&nbsp; Some clearer definition of groups who can use e-journals has eased the situation for 'authorised users', such as those teaching students of an institution who are not directly employed by the institution itself, for example, through franchised courses.&nbsp; However, there is still a group of potential users who do not have a relationship with an institution other than a wish to access the Library's holdings to further their research or their curiosity.&nbsp; In the past, such access was at the discretion of the Librarian but with regard to e-journals it is now set out in publishers’ licences, usually under the terms of 'walk-in access' to these resources.&nbsp; This in itself is a positive move and seemingly restores some access control to the Librarian.&nbsp; In practice, however, it has not proved to be straightforward to implement.</p> <p>In general terms e-journal access, although via the Web, piggybacks on established University IT systems and safeguards which have not always been specifically designed to support the licence restrictions of publishers.&nbsp; The definition of an authorised user for walk-in access is usually one who has been granted access to the Library building.&nbsp; This requirement for e-journal material to be restricted to the actual library building, not just University premises, presents a technical challenge.&nbsp; It is not reasonable to expect a University's IT infrastructure to be redesigned to accommodate the needs of those who are not part of the institution.&nbsp; However, there is a balance to be struck as a tipping point has been reached, with journal holdings become increasingly e-only and widening participation becoming increasingly important to institutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>There are a growing number of groups who would like would and benefit from walk-in access.&nbsp;&nbsp; In recent years requests for access to e-journals have become more frequent from library users, such as researchers who already use and borrow hard-copy materials through the SCONUL Access scheme, and school/college students undertaking Extended Project or International Baccalaureate qualifications.&nbsp; Clearly it is desirable to support the research community of which we are part, and to encourage EP/IB students whose next steps may well be into Higher Education.&nbsp; Visits for school/college groups are increasingly encouraged at institutional level and often include teaching and other intensive support from library staff; support which increases as the range of material they are authorised to access decreases.&nbsp; Research areas and subjects for these pieces of work are diverse and cannot be easily satisfied through textbook material or residual hard-copy journal holdings.&nbsp; In this climate, we need to look again at how to implement walk-in access to open up resources wherever possible.&nbsp; To do this we first need to take two steps: to identify which online material we can allow access to and to facilitate access through a route which meets licence terms, that is, to this material only within the library building.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up kate robinson laurence lockton lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university sconul ucisa university of bath access control accessibility authentication browser cataloguing data database dublin core ejournal firefox higher education infrastructure institutional repository intranet ldap library management systems licence opac open source opera operating system passwords research resource discovery resource management smartphone solaris url usability web browser wiki windows Fri, 27 Jul 2012 19:10:21 +0000 lisrw 2349 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Looking for the Link Between Library Usage and Student Attainment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/stone-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/stone-et-al#author1">Graham Stone</a>, <a href="/issue67/stone-et-al#author2">Bryony Ramsden</a> and <a href="/issue67/stone-et-al#author3">Dave Pattern</a> introduce the JISC-funded Library Impact Data Project (LIDP).</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/stone-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article bryony ramsden dave pattern graham stone de montfort university edina jisc leeds metropolitan university liverpool john moores university sconul university of bradford university of exeter university of huddersfield university of salford jisc information environment authentication blog data data set ebook hashtag higher education identifier library data licence opac open access open data openurl repositories research shibboleth software twitter web 2.0 web services wiki Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1626 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 10 Years of Zetoc http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/ronson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/ronson#author1">Jane Ronson</a> looks at how Zetoc has developed and what the future holds for the service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Now celebrating its 10th anniversary, Zetoc [<a href="#1">1</a>] provides quality-assured, comprehensive journal table of contents data for resource discovery that users can search and have delivered straight to their in-box or desktop. In a nutshell, Zetoc is all about convenience, current awareness and comprehensive coverage. In a recent survey, one academic commented: 'This is a "one-stop shop" for relevant literature'. What is Zetoc, what has it achieved and where is it going? In this article I will look at the history of the service and how it has developed over the past decade.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/ronson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article jane ronson british library google harvard university heriot-watt university hewlett-packard jisc loughborough university mimas national library of wales nhs sconul stanford university university of chester university of manchester university of surrey dner my references suncat tictocs zetoc aggregation authentication bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing copac data database further education google scholar higher education identifier national library open access openurl personalisation repositories research resource discovery rss search technology shibboleth soap software sru tag cloud z39.50 Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1610 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Academic Liaison Librarianship: Curatorial Pedagogy or Pedagogical Curation? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/parsons <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/parsons#author1">Allan Parsons</a> presents a strategic view of the need to develop the academic liaison librarianship role.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3 : Late changes from XHTML review in terms of references -REW 2010-11-18-16-12 --><!-- v3 : Late changes from XHTML review in terms of references -REW 2010-11-18-16-12 --><p>When reflecting on a methodological approach and set of research practices with which he was closely associated, Bruno Latour suggested that, "there are four things that do not work with actor-network theory; the word actor, the word network, the word theory and the hyphen!" [<a href="#1">1</a>]. In a similar vein, it could be suggested that, "there are three things that do not work with academic liaison librarianship: the word academic, the word liaison and the word librarianship". Why so?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/parsons" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article allan parsons dcc open university research information network sconul smithsonian institution university of oxford university of westminster archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing curation data data set database digital curation dublin core e-research framework higher education information society infrastructure managerialism metadata ontologies repositories research taxonomy vocabularies web 2.0 web development Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1588 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk CIG Conference 2010: Changes in Cataloguing in 'Interesting Times' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/cig-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/cig-2010-rpt#author1">Rhiannon McLoughlin</a> reports on a three-day conference on cataloguing in a time of financial stringency, held by the CILIP Cataloguing and Indexing Group at Exeter University, from 13-15 September 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The focus of this conference was initiatives to get through the current economic climate. Cataloguing departments are under threat of cutbacks as never before. Papers on streamlining, collaborative enterprises, shared catalogues and services, recycling and repurposing of content using metadata extraction techniques combined to give a flavour of the new thrift driving management. The continuing progress of the long awaited Resource Description and Access (RDA)[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>] towards becoming the new international cataloguing standard was another hot topic.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/cig-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report rhiannon mcloughlin british library british museum cilip google ifla jisc leeds metropolitan university library of congress mla research information network sconul ukoln university of aberdeen university of exeter university of leeds university of strathclyde university of warwick aacr2 aggregation archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cidoc-crm crm data data management digital repositories digitisation ebook frbr google search higher education lcsh learning object metadata learning objects lom marc marc21 metadata ontologies open data open source repositories research resource description and access resource discovery resource sharing schema search technology semantic web software standards vle wiki xml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1595 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Don't You Know Who I Am? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paschoud <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/paschoud#author1">John Paschoud</a> looks into identity and access management in the pre-digital and digital age, and describes how the JISC Identity Management Toolkit can help us manage identities better.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Way back in prehistory, when libraries were buildings with books in, identity management was a pretty simple challenge for them. A library was either truly 'public', in which case you did not care who came in (the more people, the more popular you were, which was 'a good thing'). Otherwise, you had to be a member, and the security officer on the door knew your face, or you could show him (it was usually a 'him', then) a card or something to prove you were a member.</p> <p>For a library to trust you to take some of its books away with you (without hiding them under your coat), you usually did have to be a member, and becoming a member entailed some sort of registration process in which you might have to prove who you were with some official-looking document. The details of each member could be recorded in some sort of register, and a card issued. Effectively taking someone's membership away again, for whatever reason, was a bit more difficult - unless there was an opportunity to wrest the precious library card from them physically!</p> <h2 id="Admissions_Rules">Admissions Rules</h2> <p>A few years ago now our Projects Team at the London School of Economics (LSE) Library [<a href="#1">1</a>] was involved in documenting and analysing the admissions rules of academic libraries in London. This was before our own library agreed to provide full access to 'the general public' (in return for Heritage Lottery grants towards a £20m building project), but I was intrigued to find that our own admissions rules included all sorts of bipartite agreements with institutions such as Kings College London (proximity, I guess) and the School of Oriental and African Studies (a lot of common-interest post-colonial subject material in each of our collections).</p> <p>The most interesting 'right of access' I found in our admissions rules was 'accredited diplomatic staff of a recognised foreign country, attached to an embassy, consulate or diplomatic mission in London'. I never actually observed anyone trying to exercise this particular right (I am excused counter duties at the library because I do not know enough about books), but I was aware that my colleagues who did serve on the Admissions Desk rota were a wonderfully diverse lot; with collectively far more knowledge of international and political affairs than this duty required. I imagined the possible scene of an intending visitor from some small state (in some dispute with the United Nations, perhaps) being rebuffed by one of our Library Assistants because he was not accredited by a <em>recognised</em> foreign country. I am sure all our LAs are much too diplomatic themselves for anything like that to actually happen now; but it did get me thinking.</p> <p>What we also discovered in the course of the same investigation was the great number of other academic libraries to which I was allowed admission, on the strength of my status as a staff member at LSE. We decided to test this out with a small 'mystery shopper' exercise. Having retrieved a copy of the access rules for South Bank University Library (with, listed somewhere on page 2, the clause allowing LSE staff members reciprocal access) I duly set off on the 171 bus, armed with the plastic card that identified me as such (with the usual un-fetching photo and the magnetic strip that magically opened the turnstile at the LSE Library when I came into the office every morning). There were two serious flaws in this plan. The first was due to the fact that single-sided photocopying was clearly the norm at South Bank, and the otherwise very polite security officer at the Perry Library was only in possession of page 1 of their admissions rules, and so he couldn't see a reason to let me in. I would like to believe that the second flaw was a result of my personal fame in the library world; but it was really because quite a lot of librarians tend to circulate around jobs in London universities, and a former LSE Library colleague was currently managing the counters there, recognised me and told the officer to let me in. The project team decided that I would need some serious disguises before being allowed out to do any more mystery shopping!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paschoud" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article john paschoud british library cardiff university jisc kings college london london school of economics school of oriental and african studies sconul south bank university ucisa university college london university of bristol es-loa identity management toolkit identity project access control archives cataloguing data data management foi graphics higher education infrastructure passwords research rfid search technology shibboleth wiki Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1542 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Get Tooled Up: Xerxes at Royal Holloway, University of London http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/grigson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author1">Anna Grigson</a>, <a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author2">Peter Kiely</a>, <a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author3">Graham Seaman</a> and <a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author4">Tim Wales</a> describe the implementation of an open source front end to the MetaLib federated search tool.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v4. completion of author details: institution - 2010-02-22-10-30- rew --><!-- v4. completion of author details: institution - 2010-02-22-10-30- rew --><p>Rarely is software a purely technical issue, though it may be marketed as 'technology'. Software is embedded in work, and work patterns become moulded around it. Thus the use of a particular package can give rise to an inertia from which it can be hard to break free.</p> <p>Moreover, when this natural inertia is combined with data formats that are opaque or unique to a particular system, the organisation can become locked in to that system, a potential victim of the pricing policies or sluggish adaptability of the software provider. The speed of change in the information world in recent years, combined with the actual or expected crunch in library funding, has made this a particular issue for library management system (LMS) users. While there is general agreement on the direction to take - more 'like Google' - LMS suppliers' moves in this direction can prove both slow and expensive for the user.</p> <p>Open source software has often been suggested as an alternative, but the nature of lock-in means that the jump from proprietary to open system can be all or nothing; in effect too big (and complex) a risk to take. No major UK university libraries have yet moved to Koha, Evergreen, or indeed any open source LMS [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>The alternative, which brings its own risks, is to take advantage of the pressures on LMS suppliers to make their own systems more open, and to use open source systems 'around the edges' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. This has the particular benefit of creating an overall system which follows the well-established design practice of creating a clean separation of 'view' (typically the Web interface) from 'model' (here the LMS-managed databases) and 'controller' (the LMS core code). The 'view' is key to the user experience of the system, and this separation gives the ability to make rapid changes or to integrate Web 2.0 features quickly and easily, independently of the system back-end. The disadvantage of this approach is that it is relatively fragile, being dependent on the willingness of the LMS supplier to provide a detailed and stable application programming interface (API).</p> <p>There are several current examples of this alternative approach. Some, like the Vufind OPAC, allow the use of plug-ins which adapt the software to a range of different LMSs. Others, like Xerxes, are specialised front-ends to a single system (MetaLib from ExLibris [<a href="#3">3</a>]). This has an impact on evaluating the software: in particular, the pool of active developers is likely to be smaller in the latter case.</p> <h2 id="Royal_Holloway_Library_Services">Royal Holloway Library Services</h2> <p>Within this general context, Royal Holloway Library Services were faced with a specific problem. The annual National Student Survey had given ratings to the Library well below those expected, with many criticisms centred on the difficulty in using the Library's MetaLib federated search system.</p> <p>MetaLib is a key access point to the Library's e-resources, incorporating both A-Z lists of major online databases available to library users, and a federated search tool. Feedback showed that many users found the interface less than satisfactory, with one user commenting that:</p> <blockquote><p><em>'MetaLib is possibly the worst and most confusing library interface I have ever come across'</em></p></blockquote> <p>The Library Management Team decided to remedy this as a matter of urgency and set a deadline of the start of the 2009 Autumn term. There was no funding available to acquire an alternative discovery system so the challenge was to identify a low-cost, quick-win solution for the existing one. With this work in mind, the incoming Associate Director (E-Strategy) had already recruited two new colleagues over the Summer vacation: a systems officer with Web development experience, the other an experienced e-resources manager.</p> <p>The first possible route to the improvement of MetaLib was modification of the existing MetaLib Web interface. This was technically possible but presented several major difficulties: the underlying ExLibris designs were based on the old HTML 4.0 and pre-dated current stylesheet-based design practice; the methods to adapt the designs were opaque and poorly documented, based on numbered variables with semantics that changed depending on context; and perhaps most importantly, the changes were to be made over the summer months, giving no time for user feedback on the details of the changes to be made.</p> <p>The second possibility was the use of Xerxes [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Xerxes offered the advantage of an interface design which had been user-tested on a range of (US) campuses, partially solving the user feedback issue. It was not, however, entirely cost-free, as ExLibris charges an annual maintenance fee for the MetaLib X-server API on which Xerxes depends.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/grigson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article anna grigson graham seaman peter kiely tim wales google jisc jisc collections kingston university microsoft royal holloway sconul university of london gnu api authentication data database ebook ejournal free software gpl html interoperability library management systems licence linux mysql opac open source php portal refworks repositories research search technology sfx software solaris standards stylesheet vufind web 2.0 web development web services wiki xml xslt Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1525 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Librarians' Information Literacy Annual Conference (LILAC) 2009 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/lilac-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/lilac-2009-rpt#author1">Rosie Jones</a> reports on a three-day conference about Information Literacy held by CILIP CSG Information Literacy Group at Cardiff University over 30 March - 1 April 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>LILAC celebrated its fifth birthday in style in what proved to be a fantastic venue, Cardiff University. This occasion was commemorated with tour t-shirts available for all the delegates. The conference proved more popular than ever with a record number of presentations submitted and over 240 delegates from across the UK and worldwide. There were also seven funded places for Library students to attend, a fantastic investment in the profession for the future.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/lilac-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 event report rosie jones american library association cardiff university college of new jersey google imperial college london jisc london metropolitan university loughborough university manchester metropolitan university princeton university sconul university of birmingham university of cambridge university of leeds university of manchester university of nottingham university of oxford university of plymouth university of sheffield university of the west of england university of worcester argosi itunes u jorum wikipedia aac blog database e-learning flash framework higher education information retrieval itunes learning objects marc multimedia podcast refworks research search technology social software twitter video vle youtube Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1474 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Libraries of the Future http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/jisc-debates-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue55/jisc-debates-rpt#author1">Michelle Pauli</a> reports on the National e-textbook Debate and Libraries of the Future panel sessions held by JISC in Birmingham over 14-15 April 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/jisc-debates-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 event report michelle pauli amazon cerlim edge hill university edina google jisc manchester metropolitan university nottingham trent university oclc sconul university of huddersfield university of sheffield digimap elib jisc information environment accessibility aggregation blog data digital preservation digitisation e-learning ebook facebook higher education infrastructure internet explorer interoperability library data library management systems metadata open access preservation repositories research rss search technology web 2.0 Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1397 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Evaluating the Impact of Your Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/parkes-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/parkes-rvw#author1">David Parkes</a> reviews a new book, targeted at managers, which is both a tool to help evaluate your library and an analysis of Impact Evaluation methodology.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>More than ever libraries and information services need to be accountable to their users, to their institutions and to their funding bodies. They need to demonstrate their value, outcomes and impact - but how?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/parkes-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 review david parkes kings college london sconul staffordshire university archives data higher education research Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1265 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Developing the New Learning Environment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/town-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue46/town-rvw#author1">Stephen Town</a> welcomes this new text on a key issue for the future of academic librarians, and suggests some broader questions for consideration.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This work promises to 'capture' and 'critically discuss' the changing support role of librarians in the current 'rapidly changing environment' where boundaries between roles are 'becoming increasingly blurred'. There is clearly a market for such a work, given that librarians in many educational contexts are indeed faced with new forms of learning environment and a significant growth in electronic, distance and blended learning.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/town-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue46 review stephen town cranfield university jisc sconul university of sheffield inlei e-learning framework knowledge management repositories research vle Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1224 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Libraries Without Walls 5 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/parkes-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue41/parkes-rvw#author1">David Parkes</a> reviews the fifth compilation of the biennial Library Without Walls Conference. He finds how far we have come and how far we have to go in delivering services to distributed learners.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This is the 5th collection of papers from the biennial Libraries Without Walls Conference (LWW5). Reference to the preceding 4 volumes published in 1996, 1998, 2000 and 2002 respectively is rewarding to see how discourse and practice has developed.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/parkes-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue41 review david parkes bbc blackboard cerlim jisc manchester metropolitan university oai open university sconul staffordshire university university of glasgow daedalus jisc information environment accessibility archives blog copyright data database digital library e-learning ebook framework ict metadata oai-pmh open archives initiative passwords portal repositories research resource discovery search technology usability vle webct wiki Fri, 29 Oct 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1099 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Developing Web-based Instruction http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/parker-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue40/parker-rvw#author1">Lyn Parker</a> finds this compilation a useful overview of the issues involved in developing e-learning and a valuable addition to the literature.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Developing Web-based instruction or online information tutorials is a key interest within Higher Education libraries at present as librarians struggle to cope with increasing student numbers, evolving technology, and higher expectations of students that their materials will be delivered electronically. Therefore, it would be expected that this book would appeal not just to information students but also to practising librarians developing resources in this area.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/parker-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue40 review lyn parker sconul university of sheffield e-learning framework higher education instructional design research software usability Thu, 29 Jul 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1075 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Developing Academic Library Staff for Future Success http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue39/town-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue39/town-rvw#author1">Stephen Town</a> considers this new multi-author volume, appreciates its many qualities and reflects on the key issues for library staff development in the digital future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This book promises to address the place of staff development in the current and future strategic management of academic libraries. The editor has assembled an impressive cast of those who are active in this field, and the authors are well able to reflect state of the art thinking. The book is informed by their close association with innovative staff development initiatives, some through involvement with the SCONUL (Society of College, National &amp; University Libraries) Advisory Committee on Staffing.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue39/town-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue39 review stephen town cranfield university jisc nhs sconul higher education research Thu, 29 Apr 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1047 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Ebooks in UK Libraries: Where Are We Now? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/garrod <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue37/garrod#author1">Penny Garrod</a> brings us up to date on developments in ebooks.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>"I suspect that more words are being published about the ebook phenomenon in print than have actually been placed into ebooks so far." </em>[<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/garrod" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue37 feature article penny garrod glasgow caledonian university jisc loughborough university microsoft nhs oclc sconul sun microsystems ukoln university of cambridge university of huddersfield university of oxford project gutenberg adobe aggregation archives authentication bibliographic data cataloguing cd-rom copyright data database digital audio digital library drm e-government e-learning ebook framework further education higher education identifier marc21 mobile mobile phone mp3 operating system passwords portal resource sharing safari software standards url web resources Thu, 30 Oct 2003 00:00:00 +0000 editor 990 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Joining Up the Dots http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/hannabuss-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue37/hannabuss-rvw#author1">Stuart Hannabuss</a> seeks the tenor among the diversity of voices provided by <em>Challenge and Change in the Information Society</em>.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Any work on the information society attracts that ambivalent reaction that it might be trite and it could be seminal. But, with the logic that nothing that becomes cliché can be other than centrally relevant, above all when published by a professional body, (which should know these things), Challenge and change promises well.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/hannabuss-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue37 review stuart hannabuss cerlim manchester metropolitan university nhs robert gordon university sconul copyright data e-government hypertext information society infrastructure knowledge management privacy standards url Thu, 30 Oct 2003 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1643 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Digitization: Do We Have a Strategy? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue30/digilib <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue30/digilib#author1">David Pearson</a> suggests that the library sector should find a mechanism to put digitisation high on the agenda.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The notion that we are living through times of great change in the communication of information and the transmission of texts is a truism which will bring a weary look to most professionals with any kind of involvement in the area. The digital age, the information age, the electronic age – we’ve all heard these terms so many times and have sat through innumerable discussions, and seen even more documents, trying to sort out what it all means.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue30/digilib" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue30 feature article david pearson bnf british library harvard university jisc sconul ukoln university of cambridge university of oxford wellcome library wellcome trust dner archives bibliographic control bibliographic data born digital cataloguing copyright database digital library digital preservation digitisation framework higher education jstor marc metadata national library preservation research search technology standards url Fri, 25 Jan 2002 00:00:00 +0000 editor 841 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Managing Electronic Library Services: Current Issues in UK Higher Education Institutions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue29/pinfield <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue29/pinfield#author1">Stephen Pinfield</a> surveys some of the key issues associated with delivering electronic library services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Managing the development and delivery of electronic library services is one of the major current challenges for university library and information services. This article provides a brief overview of some of the key issues facing information professionals working in higher education institutions (HEIs). In doing so, it also picks up some of the real-world lessons which have emerged from the eLib (Electronic Libraries) programme now that it has come to a close.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue29/pinfield" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue29 feature article stephen pinfield british library d-lib magazine jisc oai oclc sconul ukoln university of birmingham university of nottingham agora dner elib heron inspiral jisc information environment justeis nesli archives authentication bath profile bibliographic data cataloguing copyright data data set database digital library digital preservation dublin core ebook ejournal eprints framework free software higher education ict infrastructure library management systems licence managed learning environment marc metadata mysql opac open archives initiative openurl personalisation php portal preservation research resource discovery rslp schema search technology sfx software standards url vle web resources z39.50 Tue, 02 Oct 2001 23:00:00 +0000 editor 821 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Beyond the Online Tutorial http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue29/pedagogy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne reports on a one day JISC workshop in Edinburgh on pedagogical issues for projects developing resources for the DNER. (30 August)</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Beyond the Online Lecture' was a one day workshop held in the University of Edinburgh Library on a rainy August day, which considered the pedagogical issues for projects which intend to supply the DNER with resources. Caroline Ingram chaired the event and Sheila Webber and Bill Johnston were the specialists in educational issues who took the bulk of the workshop.</p> <p>Caroline opened the event by outlining the DNER as it is, and moved on to a description of what the service might be at some point in the future.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue29/pedagogy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue29 event report ariadne staff sconul ukoln university of bath university of edinburgh dner framework learning design url Tue, 02 Oct 2001 23:00:00 +0000 editor 836 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk After the Big Bang: The Forces of Change and E-Learning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue27/johnston <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue27/johnston#author1">Pete Johnston</a> examines what recent developments in the area of "e-learning" might mean for the custodians of the information resources required to support teaching and learning.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue27/johnston" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue27 feature article pete johnston hefce jisc sconul ukoln chcc dner elib heron archives bibliographic data cataloguing copyright data digitisation e-learning ebook framework further education higher education infrastructure interoperability licence metadata multimedia portal privacy repositories research resource discovery software url video Fri, 23 Mar 2001 00:00:00 +0000 editor 768 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Looking Back in Anger: A Retrospective http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue18/revill <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue18/revill#author1">Don Revill</a>, former Head of Information Services at Liverpool John Moores University, offers a retrospective.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- This document was created from RTF source by rtftohtml version 3.8 --><!-- This document was created from RTF source by rtftohtml version 3.8 --><p>Having read recent government reports, and returning now to the position of being a mere user contemplating a forty four year career in education for librarianship, libraries and (one must now add) information services, it strikes me that little has changed over the years. The problems the profession faced in the 50s and 60s are still with us.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue18/revill" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue18 feature article don revill jisc library association liverpool john moores university sconul university of stirling elib cataloguing copyright data digitisation further education higher education open access standards video Sat, 19 Dec 1998 00:00:00 +0000 editor 559 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Building on Shifting Sands: Information Age Organisations http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue17/main <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue17/main#author1">Clive Field</a> draws on his experience at the University of Birmingham to explore the issue of creating a flexible organisation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="UKOLN-page-body"> <p>This article does not tackle its subject from the theoretical perspectives and careful evaluation of the merits and demerits of different organisational models, such as one might find in a textbook on management. Rather does it seek to introduce some of the basic issues and concepts by drawing on the experience of organisational change at the University of Birmingham, where a fully converged Information Services has been in operation since October 1995, with an annual turnover of £12 million and 270 fte staff.</p> </div><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue17/main" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue17 feature article clive field sconul university of birmingham elib aggregation archives copyright higher education open access research resource management Fri, 18 Sep 1998 23:00:00 +0000 editor 529 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Newsline: News You Can Use http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue14/news <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="National_Networking_Demonstrator_Project_for_archives_launch"><a name="nndp"> National Networking Demonstrator Project for archives launch</a></h2> <p>The Archives Sub-Committee is organising a meeting to launch the NNDP which it has instigated and funded through the Non Formula Funding of Specialised Research Collections monitoring programme on 18 March. The Meeting is open to archivists and interested parties and is intended to be a platform for public review of the project's developments.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue14/news" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue14 news and events philip hunter american library association british library cni coalition for networked information heriot-watt university jisc library association sconul ukoln university college london university of bath university of hull university of manchester university of wales eevl elib archives cache cataloguing cd-rom copyright data data set database digital archive digital library ead ejournal framework graphics higher education information retrieval infrastructure intranet jstor mobile research search technology standards z39.50 Thu, 19 Mar 1998 00:00:00 +0000 editor 482 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Dearing, IT and Information Services: Two Cheers (or One and a Half?) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue13/cover <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue13/cover#author1">Lyndon Pugh</a> reviews a serious attempt to square a circle.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue13/cover" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue13 feature article lyndon pugh jisc sconul ucisa elib further education higher education infrastructure research url Mon, 19 Jan 1998 00:00:00 +0000 editor 435 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Infopolecon http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue6/lindsay <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue6/lindsay#author1">John Lindsay</a> comments on the evolution of the UK network infrastructure, and the problems arguably generated along the way.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Jeremy Bentham coined the term 'panopticon' in his proposal for a circular prison, whose cells were exposed to a central well in which the warders were located, allowing the prisoners to see all other prisoners and to be observed at all times without ever knowing when they were being watched. Bentham also promoted the idea of political economy as the greatest good for the greatest number. Drawing on his terminology as the basis for this article, I therefore propose the new term 'infopolecon' to describe the political economy of information.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue6/lindsay" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue6 feature article john lindsay british library edina jisc kingston university microsoft ncsa sconul ucisa ukerna acorn elib niss browser cataloguing cd-rom copyright data data set database digital library digitisation higher education html infrastructure licence multimedia passwords rae research search technology standardisation url z39.50 Tue, 19 Nov 1996 00:00:00 +0000 editor 192 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk