Overview of content related to 'internet archive' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/2745/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=sarah%20rayner&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en EMTACL12 (Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author1">Sarah Rayner</a> and <a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author2">Olivia Walsby</a> report on a three-day conference on Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries, hosted by NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) in Trondheim, Norway over 1 - 3 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Think_Different">Think Different</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>The three-day conference consisted of eight keynote presentations by invited speakers and a number of parallel sessions. The main themes set out for this year’s conference were supporting research, organisational change within the library, linked open data and other semantic web applications in the library, new literacies, and new services/old services in new clothes, along with other relevant perspectives on emerging technologies.</p> <p>We attended the conference to gain an overview of organisational changes happening across the sector in relation to technological developments and to gather opinion on the relevance of the academic library within a digital society. We also wanted to explore how the future exploitation of new technologies within libraries might have a positive impact on the quality of teaching and learning together with the student experience.</p> <p>This article will summarise a selection of keynote and parallel sessions from across the three days that addressed these issues.</p> <h3 id="October_2012:_Keynotes">1 October 2012: Keynotes</h3> <h2 id="Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</h2> <h3 id="Herbert_Van_de_Sompel_Los_Alamos_National_Laboratory_USA">Herbert Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA</h3> <p>The opening keynote presented by Herbert Van de Sompel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA raised the issues brought about by changes to scholarly communication. Herbert spoke about an increase in dynamic scholarly records that are continually in flux, interdependent, and Web-based, and with which our current infrastructures are unable to cope. With the publication of interdependent and executable papers, research is now a native Web activity; supporting the re-execution of algorithms and the ability to add data at any time (i.e. <a href="http://topicpages.ploscompbiol.org/wiki/Topic_Pages">PLoS Topic Pages</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] <a href="https://peerj.com/">PeerJ</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>]). Herbert pointed out that, as a consequence, we now need to be able to view the state of a scholarly record at certain moments in time; to track back in time to see where findings have come from, and to trace the workflow, and therein lies a challenge for academic libraries.</p> <p>Herbert explained that at present the archive infrastructure is only able to deal with static, non-fluxing research output, that, when using URIs, you will always come to the current version, not prior versions, and that Web archives are not integrated into the Web. As Herbert went on to point out, the key problem is that the Web was created without motion of time; existing in the ‘perpetual now’.</p> <p>Herbert believes that the challenges we face in this new environment are two-fold: archival approaches need to be changed to use a different infrastructure; and we need to reassess how we reference scholarly assets. We have CMS records, Web archives, and caches, but it would be better to trace the history or timeline of a URI. Therefore, Herbert offered some potential tools and solutions; <a href="http://mementoweb.org/">Memento</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>] (started in 2009) allows you to track back to a past version of an item in the Internet archive, bridging current URIs to old URIs from the Internet archive, using a time gate. <a href="http://mementoweb.github.com/SiteStory/" title="SiteStory">SiteStory</a> [<a href="#4">4</a>] is a tool which allows your Web server to take an active part in its own archiving; every request from a user is pushed back to an archive and stored. Therefore, every time material is accessed, it is archived, thereby providing a true history of an object in the archive.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure1-herbert-van-de-sempel-v3.jpg" style="width: 477px; height: 358px;" title="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Herbert Van de Sompel</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>In conclusion, Herbert suggested that archiving needs to be an ongoing activity, tracing every interaction, including archiving links at the time of publication to ensure that the context and history of an evolving piece of research will never be lost.</p> <h2 id="Think_Different">Think Different</h2> <h3 id="Karen_Coyle_Berkeley_CA_USA">Karen Coyle, Berkeley, CA, USA</h3> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure2-karen-coyle-v2.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" title="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Karen Coyle</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>Karen opened by raising a challenge to the way in which libraries are still holding on to outdated practices, such as the librarian’s obsession with alphabetical order, describing it as essentially only ‘an accident of language’ and questioning its continuing relevance given the now pervasive ability to cross-search. Karen continued on this theme citing bibliographic hierarchies such as Dewey as ‘knowledge prevention systems’ which only serve to lock our users into a set view of what's out there.</p> <p>Karen’s introduction led nicely on to the main themes of her presentation: the current role of the library, the need to move away from the view that getting the book into the user’s hand is the end game, and the need to change our attitudes to bibliographic control and linear order. In effect, ‘the library should no longer be about volume and ownership!’. Karen talked about how we should instead focus on <em>how</em> resources are used and what resources should be used <em>together,</em> to inform how we approach provision in the future. Karen believes that the library must become connected to information on the Web, providing more context for our users and thus allowing greater information discovery. Karen argued that the library’s role is no longer simply to gather items into an inventory but to seek to organise information that until now has been inconveniently packaged. She suggested that we need to change our view, to focus on the information and its context, <em>not</em> the objects or books themselves. Karen noted in particular that currently we present nothing within the context of time, reiterating the theme of time travel covered in Herbert’s presentation. So, how can we do this? Karen proposed that we should be able to interrogate catalogues to provide items with context. She gave examples such as <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/">WorldCat</a> [<a href="#5">5</a>], where you can view timelines on people, what they have published and what has been published about them, giving a relative image of their importance.<br /><br />Karen argued that although linked data could prove to be an answer, or could certainly help, we must nonetheless seek to find a range of solutions and technologies. She warned that the pitfall of having an answer is that it stops you asking questions! Karen talked about how libraries must now recognise that bibliographic data are available everywhere, and that what libraries have that is essential and unique are the details on holdings. She proposed that on searching the Web, part of the rich snippet should include information about what the library holds and whether it's available. The Web should be used to direct readers to their library holdings, as well as making use of data such as location information, already being sourced by search engines. Karen’s concluding remarks were that libraries need to look to this new approach (using tools such as <a href="http://Schema.org" target="_blank">Schema.org</a> [<a href="#6">6</a>]) or they will lose visitors, and that if we want to remain visible and relevant, we need to be where our users are - on the Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report olivia walsby sarah rayner jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas ukoln university of bath university of manchester internet archive memento scarlet schema.org worldcat algorithm api archives augmented reality bibliographic control bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing content management data dissemination e-learning ebook framework google docs google maps information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer ipad linked data lod mobile open access research search technology social networks software uri web 2.0 web app windows Thu, 13 Dec 2012 14:42:26 +0000 lisrw 2410 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk